An official website of the United States government.

We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Texas

If you are having trouble viewing the map in your browser, click the 'View larger map' link below


Bailey Waste Disposal Capped Site Reuse

Bailey Waste DisposalBailey Waste DisposalThe Bailey Waste Disposal Superfund site is located about three miles from Bridge City, Texas. The site was originally part of a tidal marsh near the confluence of the Neches River and Sabine Lake. In the early 1950s, the property owner built two ponds on the site by dredging the marsh and piling the sediments to form levees around the ponds. In the 1950s and 1960s, the property owner allowed industrial and municipal waste disposal on part of the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984 to address soil and sediment contamination. Key cleanup actions included disposing of some waste off site and capping remaining waste material on site. Potentially responsible parties completed cleanup actions in 1997. These actions protected sensitive wetlands and made them safe for wildlife and recreation. Site inspection and maintenance activities are ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:


Bandera Road Ground Water Plume Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Bandera Road Ground Water Plume Superfund site is located in Leon Valley, Texas. The site includes an area of groundwater contamination that is about a mile long and a half-mile wide and the plume is centered in a business area, with some residential homes nearby. Past business operations nearby caused the contamination. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) discovered the groundwater contamination in 2004. TCEQ installed water filtration systems on five private wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2007. EPA connected affected residents to municipal water lines in 2008. Businesses continue to operate at groundwater contamination source areas. The site area also includes the Huebner-Onion Homestead and Stagecoach Stop. This historic resource, dating to 1862, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 31 people and generated an estimated $4,403,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Big Tex Grain Co. Cultural/Historical Reuse

The 7.5-acre Big Tex Grain Co. Superfund site is located at the 300 block of Blue Star Street in San Antonio, Texas. From 1961 to 1989, several industrial activities took place on site, including vermiculite exfoliation, grain production and sawdust warehousing. During this time, the plant received over 100,000 tons of asbestos-contaminated raw vermiculite ore. Plant operations contaminated dust, air and soil with asbestos. An EPA assessment found that the site was highly contaminated with asbestos. In late 2008, EPA completed cleanup actions, removing contaminated soil, disposing of contaminated materials off site and cleaning on-site buildings. Early in the cleanup process, the site owner expressed interest in redeveloping the site after cleanup finished. EPA issued a Ready for Reuse Determination for the site in November 2008 stating that the site was ready for unrestricted reuse. In 2012, the City of San Antonio approved $5 million in tax incentives and an economic development grant to help fund development of a mixed-use complex at the site. Project construction began in October 2014 and is now complete. The Flats at Big Tex development features apartments and townhomes, restaurants and retail space, and retains several historic property features such as a large grain solo.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses.  EPA did not have further economic details related to these businesses. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Falcon Refinery

The 104-acre Falcon Refinery Superfund site is located near Ingleside, Texas. The inactive refinery produced various petroleum products from 1980 until 1987. Refinery activities and waste disposal practices contaminated nearby Redfish Bay sediments and the site soil and sediments with hazardous chemicals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2011. Cleanup activities are ongoing. The site refinery is currently inactive. The current owner of the property uses it for crude oil storage and transfer. The property owner is in the process of refurbishing and reusing eight aboveground storage tanks on the site.
Last updated November 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Main Street Ground Water Plume

The Main Street Ground Water Plume Superfund site is located in Burnet County, Texas, about a mile south of the city limits of Burnet. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated groundwater from an unknown source reached the aquifer, creating a contaminated groundwater plume. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) discovered site contamination in 2010. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2015. Remedial investigation is ongoing. Residential areas and pasture lands are located at the site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


North Cavalcade Street Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 21-acre North Cavalcade Street Superfund site is located in an industrial, commercial and residential section of Houston, Texas. The site is the former home of Houston Creosoting Company, Inc. (HCCI), a wood-treating business that operated on site from 1946 to 1961. Facility operations and waste disposal practices caused contamination in soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Final cleanup actions included soil containment and capping, in-place stabilization of two groundwater sources, establishment of a Technical Impracticability Zone and long-term monitoring. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The northern 10 acres of the site, excluding the cap, are available for reuse. Private owners maintain their commercial facilities and operations on the southern half of the site. A business continued to operate throughout the cleanup process. The Harris County Toll Road Authority plans to extend Hardy Toll Road along the site’s western boundary to ease traffic flow north from downtown Houston. The Toll Road Authority will build the extension on a former railroad easement next to the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 8 people and generated an estimated $2,254,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Palmer Barge Line

The 17-acre Palmer Barge Line Superfund site is located east-northeast of Port Arthur, Texas. The local government used the area as a municipal landfill from 1956 to 1987. In 1982, Palmer Barge Line purchased part of the site for a barge and marine vessel service and maintenance facility. After investigations by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) and EPA found contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. Cleanup actions in 2000 and 2007 included waste removal, water treatment, oil/water separation, sludge stabilization, and removal of contaminated soil and sludge. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2012. Tubal-Cain Holdings Company purchased the site property in mid-2015. In 2017, Tubal-Cain completed construction of an industrial services facility and headquarters building on site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 30 people and generated an estimated $4,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. (Turtle Bayou) Core Infrastructure Reuse

Bridge over Turtle Bayou (CR126)Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. (Turtle Bayou)The Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. Superfund site is located in a rural area 15 miles southeast of Liberty, Texas. Site operations started before 1970 and continued until the late 1970s. Parties dumped waste oils on County Road (CR 126) and into unlined waste pits along the road. After 1974, the owner split the site into 5-acre and 15-acre plots. The owner sold the plots for residential development. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986 to address soil and groundwater contamination. Cleanup included the excavation and reconstruction of CR 126 using clean materials. The County is responsible for long-term maintenance of CR 126. As part of the cleanup, one of the responsible parties also bought out some of the site’s residential properties. For residents not interested in relocating, the responsible party bought out their groundwater rights. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The site is in continued public service use – CR 126 crosses the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


RSR Corporation Capped Site Reuse

The Dallas Housing Authority Central Office on the siteRSR CorporationThe RSR Corporation Superfund site is part of a residential and commercial area in West Dallas, Texas. The site includes a former lead smelter, several landfills and a 13.6-square-mile area investigated for lead contamination. RSR Corporation operated a lead smelter on site from the 1920s to 1984. The company disposed of waste materials on site and in area landfills. The smelter also sent lead-contaminated smog into the surrounding community. Studies confirmed high blood-lead levels for residents and children living near the smelter. In 1995, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities prioritized the smelter facility, area landfills, affected residential areas and parks. EPA and the Dallas Housing Authority (DHA) removed lead-contaminated soil and buildings from a DHA public housing area northeast of the smelter. EPA and DHA cleaned up over 400 properties from 1991 to 1994. Cleanup of these areas resulted in lowered blood-lead levels for children and residents living in West Dallas. Cleanup also facilitated redevelopment. Portions of the DHA area now include new commercial businesses. Cleanup also made it possible for DHA to build single-family, multi-family and senior residential units as well as a nursing facility for seniors. The headquarters for Goodwill Industries of Dallas is located in the DHA area. Cleanup of other portions of the site, including the former smelter facility and disposal areas, is also now complete. EPA issued Ready for Reuse Determinations for the smelter facility and disposal areas in 2006 to facilitate future redevelopment. Ongoing uses include churches, parks, primary and secondary schools, commercial businesses and a community YMCA. In November 2015, EPA Region 6 recognized the efforts of DHA and Goodwill Industries of Dallas with its Excellence in Site Reuse award.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 59 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 917 people and generated an estimated $74,915,875 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


San Jacinto River Waste Pits

The San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site is located in Harris County, Texas. In the mid-1960s, impoundments were built on site for the disposal of paper mill wastes. The northern impoundments cover about 14 acres and are partially submerged in the San Jacinto River. The southern impoundment covers less than 20 acres; warehouses and a boat repair facility are located there. EPA selected the cleanup plan for the site and is negotiating with the site’s potentially responsible parties to clean up the site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 521 people and generated an estimated $128,290,256 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Sikes Disposal Pits

The 185-acre Sikes Disposal Pits site is located near Crosby, Texas. From 1955 until 1968, an illegal open dump operated on site. Initial investigations discovered about 2,000 drums of waste. Waste disposal operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Cleanup activities included excavation and incineration of contaminated soil and sludge, on-site disposal of residue ash from incineration, backfilling of pits and excavated areas, treatment of contaminated surface water, groundwater monitoring, and institutional controls. After cleanup, a honeybee farm began operating on site in 2011. A marina operates on the southwest corner of the site. Recreational fishermen use the ponds at the marina for fishing. Recreational campers and boaters also use the marina area as a campground and as a boat launch to the San Jacinto River. Sports fishermen and water sport enthusiasts frequent the area on the nearby Jackson Bayou and San Jacinto River. Both Jackson Bayou and the San Jacinto River have designated beneficial uses for contact recreation and high aquatic life habitat.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This businesses employed one person and generated an estimated $173,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


South Cavalcade Street Capped Site Reuse

South Cavalcade StreetSouth Cavalcade StreetThe 66-acre South Cavalcade Street Superfund site is located about three miles north of downtown Houston, Texas. A wood preserving facility operated on the site from 1910 to 1962. Owners also built a coal tar distillation plant on the southeastern portion of the site; it operated from 1944 to 1962. After the discovery of contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included consolidating and capping contaminated soils and installing a groundwater pump-and-treat system. In September 2014, EPA selected a new groundwater remedy. Short-term and long-term monitoring of groundwater is ongoing. In 2000, parties installed concrete caps that serve as truck parking. Pavement, buildings and storage areas cover much of the site, particularly on its southern half. Several businesses use the site for commercial and industrial purposes, including distribution, warehousing, car sales and pallet supplies. A commercial business purchased the northern half of the site in March 2014. Harris County Toll Road Authority plans to expand the street next to the southern side of the site and extend the toll road next to its western edge.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 83 people and generated an estimated $94,561,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Star Lake Canal

Star Lake CanalStar Lake CanalThe Star Lake Canal Superfund site is located in Jefferson County, Texas, in and around the cities of Port Neches and Groves. The site includes two industrial canals and associated wetlands. The two canals are the Star Lake Canal and the Jefferson Canal. Since the late 1940s, the canals have served as industrial wastewater and stormwater outfalls for nearby chemical and manufacturing facilities during heavy rain events. Unpermitted and permitted discharges into both canals resulted in the contamination of site surface water, soils and sediments. In March 1983, the Texas Department of Water Resources collected sediment samples from Jefferson Canal and noted the presence of many types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After further investigations, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in August 2000. EPA selected the site’s remedy in 2013. It includes excavation, disposal and capping of contaminated soil and sediments as well as monitored natural recovery. EPA is currently preparing an agreement to carry out the remedy. Nearby chemical and manufacturing facilities continue to use both canals for industrial and stormwater purposes. Site wetlands are also habitat areas used by state-designated threatened species.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


State Marine of Port Arthur

The State Marine of Port Arthur Superfund site is a 17-acre industrial tract of land located east of Port Arthur, Texas. In the 1960s and 1970s, parties used the area for municipal landfill and barge-cleaning operations. In 1998, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2001, EPA removed source materials from the site. Cleanup activities included waste removal, water treatment, oil/water separation, and sludge stabilization and off-site disposal. After the removal action, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2012. Tubal-Caine Holdings Company purchased the site property in mid-2015. Two of its subsidiaries, Tubal-Caine Marine Services and Tubal-Caine Gas Free Services, now operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 120 people and generated an estimated $27,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Tex Tin Corp. Capped Site Reuse

Image of the Tex Tin Corp.Tex Tin Corp.The 140-acre Tex Tin Corp. Superfund site is located near the banks of Galveston Bay in Texas City, Texas. Copper and tin smelting facilities operated on site from the beginning of World War II until the mid-1980s. Years of non-compliance with state environmental permitting requirements resulted in the site’s referral to EPA. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. Cleanup addressed waste piles, wastewater treatment ponds, acid ponds and slag piles. Cleanup actions also focused on the nearby Swan Lake Salt Marsh Area. After cleanup, EPA awarded the site a Superfund Redevelopment grant in 2001. EPA issued the nation’s first Ready for Reuse Determination for the site in 2003. It stated that the remedy was protective for industrial uses as long as certain site conditions were met. After several initial reuse efforts, Texas City Terminal Railway Company bought the site property in 2010. In November 2015, Genesis Energy, L.P. (Genesis), an integrated midstream energy company, signed a long-term lease with Texas City Terminal Railway Company for a portion of the site property to reuse as an oil terminal and transfer facility. The terminal went into service on May 1, 2017. This significant investment in the site also serves a critical role supporting offshore crude oil producers and oil refineries in the area. In November 2017, EPA Region 6 presented Excellence in Site Reuse awards to Genesis, the Tex Tin Steering Committee and its remedial contractors, the Texas City Terminal Railway Company, and local officials in recognition of their extensive collaboration, cooperation and leadership throughout the cleanup and redevelopment of the site. Additionally, the Swan Lake Salt Marsh Area at the site continues to provide wildlife habitat and serves as a migratory bird flyway.
Last updated December 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 9 people. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


United Creosoting Co. Capped Site Reuse

The 45-acre United Creosoting Company Superfund site is located in Conroe, Texas, about 40 miles north of Houston. From 1946 to 1972, the United Creosoting Company operated a wood preserving facility on site. Operators treated formed lumber such as telephone poles and railroad ties. In 1977, developers built a residential subdivision and light industrial facilities on part of the site. After the discovery of contaminated soil and groundwater, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup included removal and off-site disposal of highly-contaminated soils, treatment and capping of less-contaminated soils, and groundwater monitoring. The Conroe municipal water supply connects to all buildings on site. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality conducts groundwater monitoring and leads all site operation and maintenance activities. Residential and light industrial land uses at the site are ongoing. A bail bonds business recently began operating on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 13 people and generated an estimated $2,032,581 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


West County Road 112 Ground Water

The West County Road 112 Ground Water Plume Superfund site is located in Midland County, Texas. It consists of a 260-acre plume of contaminated groundwater. Sampling by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) found chromium contamination in 2009. EPA began an investigation on site in 2010. TCEQ sampled over 230 wells and found contamination in 46 wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2011 based on evidence of potential exposure of residents to chromium through private drinking water supply wells. The site is currently in the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) stage of remediation. TCEQ installed and maintains water filtration systems in homes with chromium-contaminated wells at no cost to residents. In addition to the residences, many businesses operate in the plume area, including oil field service companies, convenience stores and restaurants.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 149 people and generated an estimated $33,769,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page