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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Washington

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Alcoa (Vancouver Smelter)

The 300-acre Alcoa (Vancouver Smelter) Superfund site is located next to the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington. The former Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) constructed an aluminum smelter on part of the site in 1940. Alcoa operated the facility until 1985. From 1973 until 1981, operators dumped tons of potliner containing cyanide and fluoride outside the smelter on the ground. The dumping contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The state worked with Alcoa to dispose of the hazardous soil, making the riverfront property available for use. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. In 2002, Evergreen Aluminum (Glencore) purchased the facility, with Alcoa retaining ownership of some of the land. In 2009, the Port of Vancouver purchased about 218 acres of the land. The purchase allowed the Port to develop Terminal 5, its newest marine terminal. Less than a month after closing on the property, the Port began handling wind energy cargo at its new terminal. In 2013, Tesoro-Savage launched a joint venture called Vancouver Energy for a crude oil distribution facility at terminal 5. The proposed facility will generate $2 billion in economic benefits for the local and regional economy. It will create 1,000 total jobs, including 175 permanent jobs on site. The development is in the review stages of the Environmental Impact Statement process.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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American Crossarm & Conduit Co.

The 16-acre American Crossarm & Conduit Co. Superfund site is located in Chehalis, Washington. During its operation, the facility dumped wastewater contaminated with wood-treating chemicals, fuels and solvents into an unlined pit. This activity, combined with periodic flooding from nearby rivers, spread hazardous wastes onto nearby properties and contaminated groundwater. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup actions included removing contaminated soil, demolishing contaminated site structures, removing oil from groundwater and covering excavated areas with clean soil. Despite the site’s favorable location, a EPA cleanup lien on the site presented a barrier to developers. In the late 1990s, EPA agreed to remove its lien on the condition that any new owners add fill so the property would be out of the floodplain. Owners must also not dig into the site’s cap, use the groundwater or sell the property without passing on the land use restrictions. This agreement made redevelopment possible at the site; a new structure was built on site in 1998. A machine and repair shop now operate in the facility. A fitness center and a Head Start children's education facility are located in a second two-story building built on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 13 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 48 people and generated an estimated $21,298,897 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Asarco Inc. Capped Site Reuse

Condominiums and parking lotAsarco Inc.The Asarco Inc. Superfund site is located in Ruston and Tacoma, Washington on Commencement Bay. It is part of the Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tide Flats Superfund site. Like many other ports across the country, the shores of Commencement Bay have long been home to industry. The cleanup and redevelopment of the 67-acre Asarco Tacoma Smelter site is a model of cooperation among EPA, the local community and a land development company. From 1890 to 1985, Asarco used the site to smelt and refine lead and copper. Site activities resulted in the release of metals into the soil, air, bay and groundwater. In 1983, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). After public meetings, Asarco and EPA developed a comprehensive plan for cleanup that included local reuse ideas. In 2005, after filing for bankruptcy, Asarco entered into an agreement with MC Construction Consultants to sell the site and another nearby Asarco property. MC Construction Consultants then assigned its purchase rights to Point Ruston, LLC in order to develop a large-scale residential and mixed-use community called Point Ruston. After finalizing agreements with EPA in 2006, Point Ruston, LLC purchased the property and agreed to take over the cleanup of the site and some other outlying areas. EPA required Point Ruston, LLC to clean up the Asarco smelter, cap slag, clean up offshore sediments and remove shallow sediments from a nearby basin. As part of the cleanup approach, EPA allowed Point Ruston, LLC to combine the development of the site with site capping. The buildings and hard surfaces of the development would become part of the cap. Point Ruston, LLC started construction of the foundations of two condominiums on the site in 2008. Once complete, Point Ruston will also include retail shopping, a hotel, community activity plaza and shoreline recreational opportunities. In July 2014, the second phase of the Point Ruston development began with a growing demand for retail space including a sushi restaurant, seafood house and a theatre. Most Point Ruston residences incorporate green building principles. EPA has also partnered with Metro Parks Tacoma to clean up and redevelop the area around the Tacoma Yacht Club and Marina basin portions of the Asarco Site. The Peninsula is constructed of slag material from the former Asarco Smelter and is being capped in place to prevent erosion and exposure to heavy metals, such as lead, arsenic and copper. Metro Parks is constructing a park over the constructed cap that will be open to the public and will extend the waterfront walk along Ruston Way and connect with Point Defiance Park. The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department have partnered with EPA to clean up contaminated yards near the former Asarco Smelter. Ecology started replacing soil on the first yards within the study area in 2013. There are 1,100 yards that qualify for soil replacement. Ecology is working on 80-100 yards each year. To date, Ecology has replaced contaminated soil with clean soil at 188 residential properties in the Asarco/EPA study area and sends out mailers to inform the public of their progress.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Centralia Municipal Landfill

The 87-acre Centralia Municipal Landfill Superfund site is located in Centralia, Washington. Landfill operations contaminated groundwater and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. The site’s long-term remedy included long-term groundwater and surface water monitoring and long-term operation and maintenance of the final landfill cover system. Remedy construction took place in 1999. Site monitoring is ongoing. In 1994, the Lewis County Central Transfer Station facility was built on site. It includes an administrative office building and a waste management facility.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $4,278,000 in annual sales revenue.  For additional information click here.

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Commencement Bay, South Tacoma Channel Capped Site Reuse

The Commencement Bay, South Tacoma Channel Superfund site is located in Tacoma, Washington. It consists of three separate areas – the South Tacoma Field, the Tacoma Landfill and Well 12A. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. South Tacoma Field is a 260-acre area used by Burlington Northern Railroad for rail car manufacturing, repair and maintenance from 1892 to 1974. Two metal workshops also operated in the area, in support of the railroad. Tacoma City Light has continuously operated on the north end of South Tacoma Field since 1953. These activities caused site-wide soil contamination as well as localized groundwater contamination. Cleanup included soil removal, soil capping, development restrictions and monitoring of natural processes to clean up groundwater. Residents use the western side of the South Tacoma Field for recreation, including biking, dog walking and flying model airplanes. Businesses operating on the southern half of the South Tacoma Field include Pioneer Builders Supply, General Plastics and Industrial Properties, which leases warehouse, office and yard space to businesses. The Tacoma Landfill covers about 210 acres. The City of Tacoma operates the landfill. Since 1960, it has accepted municipal, industrial, construction, demolition and bulk wastes. Operations contaminated soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. Landfill gas also contains VOCs. Cleanup included landfill capping, management of landfill gas and treatment of groundwater. After discovery of contamination in Well 12A (a City of Tacoma drinking water well) in 1981, EPA began treating the groundwater and soil in 1983. Additional cleanup activities to treat remaining soil contamination are currently underway. Western Moving and Storage and Sine Communications currently use the Well 12A area for storage and office space. The City of Tacoma has established a waste collection and transfer station, hazardous waste drop-off station and a recycling station on top of the closed landfill. Tacoma’s Envirohouse is also located on site. The EnviroHouse is a model home showcasing green building and natural landscape ideas, materials and techniques.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 21 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 674 people and generated an estimated $138,750,353 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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FMC Corp. (Yakima Pit)

Garden area of hardware storeFMC Corp. (Yakima Pit)The 4-acre FMC Corp. Superfund site is located in Yakima, Washington. The site operated as a pesticide formulation facility from 1951 until 1986. From 1952 to 1969, FMC disposed of agricultural pesticides in a pit on site. A 6-foot chain link fence limits access to the pit area. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 after finding groundwater and soil contaminated with pesticides. Under an EPA order, FMC disposed of about 850 tons of contaminated soil in 1988 and 1989. In 1990, EPA required FMC to remove and incinerate contaminated soils on site. FMC completed cleanup in 1993. Land use controls are in place on a portion of the site to prevent exposure to remaining soil and groundwater contamination. Stephens Metal Products owns a large commercial building, parking lot and equipment storage yard on site and rents these facilities to another business. Country Farm & Garden True Value Hardware store purchased parts of the former FMC-leased property west of Stephens Metal Products and constructed buildings several years ago that continue to be open to the community.  The Butler RV and Welding business recently sold their parcel (south of the hardware store) to another business and followed the institutional controls/environmental covenant in the process.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $750,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Harbor Island (Lead) Capped Site Reuse

The Harbor Island (Lead) Superfund site is an industrial island located in Seattle’s Elliott Bay. Built in the early 1900s, the 420-acre island supports commercial and industrial activities, including ocean and rail transport operations. Site operations contaminated groundwater, sediment and soil with lead and other contaminants. In 1983, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1991, the Port of Seattle expressed interest in expanding Terminal 18, which lies on the east side of the island. Before the expansion could take place, EPA required the Port and other responsible parties to clean up the contaminated media. Under a legal agreement with EPA, the Port demolished contaminated industrial buildings, removed most contaminated soils and began groundwater monitoring. It also paved much of the site to minimize the spread of contamination through infiltration of rain. The redevelopment project created a 1.1-acre public park with 380 feet of waterfront access, walking paths and benches. Other upgrades on Harbor Island included road improvements, new sidewalks and bike paths. The cleanup allowed the Port to move ahead with a $300-million, 90-acre expansion of Terminal 18. The expansion included a new dockside rail yard, two new truck gates, a larger container storage yard and other amenities to improve goods-handling capabilities. In 2004, the site received a prestigious Phoenix Award for achievement of excellence in Superfund site reuse. A ship repair and construction facility that began operating on the island in 1916, as well as separate oil storage facilities, continue to operate on the island. The ship construction facility employs over 400 workers and currently is using a petroleum extraction and treatment system for remaining underground petroleum contamination. Under EPA oversight, responsible parties have cleaned contaminated marine sediments and subtidal debris, and have created extensive beach habitat. EPA is conducting additional studies of the remaining uncharacterized marine sediments. It expects the cleanup will start before 2020 and will make the sediments healthier for fish and mud-dwelling creatures.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 37 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,358 people and generated an estimated $836,821,531 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Lakewood

The 7-acre Lakewood Superfund site is located in Lakewood, Washington. A dry-cleaning business operated on site, contaminating soil, sludge and groundwater with solvents. EPA added the site to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL) in 1982. Cleanup included removal and off-site disposal of septic tank contents and sludge, backfilling of the area with clean material, soil vapor extraction to address contaminated soil, and groundwater use restrictions. Operation and maintenance activities and monitoring are ongoing. An electrical supply and lighting company now operates out of the former dry-cleaning facility on site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 17 people and generated an estimated $7,000,000 in annual sales revenue.  For additional information click here.

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Lockheed West Seattle Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Lockheed West Seattle Superfund site is located on the southwestern shoreline of the Elliott Bay in Seattle, Washington. The site is located next to the Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5, and includes the former shipyard support operations area. The 40-acre site includes about 7 acres of aquatic tidelands owned by the Port of Seattle and 33 acres of state-owned aquatic lands. Historic industrial practices at the former shipyard released contaminants into the bay. Before its transfer to the Superfund program, the State of Washington listed the site as a “sediment cleanup priority project” under State of Washington cleanup authority. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2007. In 2012, EPA issued a cleanup plan for contaminated sediments at the site. Cleanup includes bringing contamination levels down to statewide standards and adding a thin layer of sediment to enhance natural recovery. In August 2013, as part of the Record of Decision, EPA released its final two-year cleanup plan expected to begin 2018. After this cleanup, there should be few restrictions to maritime activities and future uses near the site. As part of this effort, EPA is engaging with Tribal members from the Muckleshoot and Suquamish Tribes who harvest seafood around Harbor Island. The West Waterway portion of the site includes a federal navigation channel that remains in use. The Port of Seattle envisions expanding Terminal 5 including pier structures, as a container terminal along the West Waterway sometime in the future. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has submitted a Water Resources Development Act request to Congress requesting authorization to deepen the navigation channel. Natural areas of the site support birds, crabs and multiple fish species including salmon.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Lower Duwamish Waterway Cultural/Historical Reuse Tribal Lands/Native American Interests

The Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund site is a five-mile stretch of the Duwamish River that flows into East and West Waterways (part of the Harbor Island Superfund site) then into Elliott Bay in Seattle, Washington. The South Park and Georgetown neighborhoods and industrial corridors flank the waterway. A century of heavy industrial use left the waterway contaminated with toxic chemicals from many sources. These include nearby industries; stormwater pipes; and runoff from upland activities, streets and roads from a 32-square-mile drainage basin. Native American tribes use the Lower Duwamish as a fishing resource and for cultural purposes, as do diverse groups of regional fishers, many from communities with environmental justice characteristics. The Lower Duwamish Waterway also supports considerable commercial navigation. Recreational enthusiasts use the waterway for various activities, such as boating, kayaking, fishing and beach play. In response to contamination in sediments, fish and shellfish, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001. The Washington Department of Ecology uses its state authorities to control ongoing contaminant sources in coordination with the in-waterway investigation and cleanup led by EPA. The City of Seattle, King County, the Port of Seattle and the Boeing Company, collectively known as the Lower Duwamish Waterway Group, led site investigations and several early cleanup activities under oversight by EPA and the state. In 2013, EPA issued a proposed cleanup plan to address long-term cleanup at the site. Following the public comment period, where EPA received over 2,300 public comments, EPA selected a cleanup plan in 2014. The plan includes active sediment cleanup through dredging, capping, and enhanced natural recovery over an estimated 177 acres. EPA will conduct monitored natural recovery for the remaining 235 acres, which are less contaminated areas. EPA also plans to work with the liable parties on the next steps in implementing its cleanup plan. The plan estimates that sediment cleanup will cost about $342 million. Around 2015, a startup called the Duwamish Rowing Club started using safe parts of the site for rowing, with the goal to connect people of South Park and nearby neighborhoods to the natural resource flowing through the area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Midway Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Midway LandfillMidway LandfillThe 60-acre Midway Landfill Superfund site is located in King County, Washington, between U.S. Interstate 5 (I-5) and U.S. Highway 99. The former gravel quarry served as a municipal solid waste landfill from 1966 to 1983. Local officials created Midway Landfill primarily to accept demolition materials, wood waste and other slowly decomposing materials. Operators also put other industrial wastes in the landfill. In 1983, the operators covered the landfill with silt and fine sands. In 1985, investigations identified combustible gas in structures around the landfill and contaminated groundwater beyond the landfill boundary. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1992, the City of Seattle constructed a final cap over the site, refined landfill gas controls, and installed a stormwater and drainage control system. These remedy components continue to function as planned. Washington State’s Department of Ecology is the lead agency for the site. Sound Transit, the area’s public transit system, is extending its Link light rail system and plans to use the edge of the Midway Landfill as part of the route extension. The other part of the site remains a closed landfill and is unused open space.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Moses Lake Wellfield Contamination

The Moses Lake Wellfield Contamination Superfund site is located in the City of Moses Lake, Washington. The site includes parts of the former Larson Air Force Base, Grant County Airport and some areas south of the airport. The U.S. government established the Larson Air Force Base in 1942 and closed the base in 1965. During this period, the Air Force, Boeing Company and the Strategic Air Command and Titan Missile program used the base at various points. Former base operations and associated industrial activities contaminated soil and about 100 acres of groundwater with hazardous chemicals. In 1966, the Port of Moses Lake acquired most of the former base and has since operated the property as the Grant County Airport. Housing associated with the base also remains in use, now under ownership of the Grant County housing authority. The U.S. Air Force transferred other facilities to Big Bend Community College. In 1968, Boeing returned to the airport by purchasing 130 acres that included the Three-Place Hangar. In 1992, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) because of soil and groundwater contamination. In 2003, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed construction of a replacement water supply well for the nearby Skyline residential water system. This well continues to provide reliable, clean drinking water to the Skyline community. A 2008 EPA interim cleanup plan requires installation of groundwater pump and treat systems for two of five known areas of groundwater contamination. At EPA’s request, USACE is conducting sampling of private residential wells and installing and maintaining whole house filters for protection of residents. The cleanup design for the South Base Dump area is complete. The cleanup design for the South Groundwater Plume area is nearly complete. One of the waste sites identified for additional study has been sampled and determined to be ready for reuse. New industries and businesses are developing this site, along with other areas within the institutional control boundary. Industrial activities continue around the airport today.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 47 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,656 people and generated an estimated $410,633,787 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Market Street

The 50-acre North Market Street Superfund site is located in Spokane, Washington. The Phillips Petroleum Company, the Tosco Refining Company and Chevron operated a petroleum refining and distribution complex at the site since the 1980s. Industrial activities and mishandling led to major oil spill incidents in 1985, 1989 and 1990 that contaminated soil and groundwater with petroleum and chemicals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup included soil excavation, on-site soil treatment and passive groundwater cleanup. Cleanup finished in 2002. Spokane County set land use restrictions for the site. Holly Energy Partners now operates an industrial fuel distribution facility on the property. Other commercial companies also use parts of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 25 people and generated an estimated $73,457,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Northside Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Maintenance buildings at the landfillNorthside LandfillThe Northside Landfill Superfund site is located on a 345-acre parcel of land in Spokane, Washington. Established as a city landfill in 1931, the landfill was the largest refuse disposal operation in Spokane County. Open burning took place at the landfill until the mid-1950s. The City of Spokane extended municipal water supplies to the area in 1984. In 1986, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) because of contaminated groundwater and sludge. In 1989, EPA selected a cleanup approach for the landfill that included closing and capping the old landfill units, treating and monitoring groundwater, collecting landfill gas and restricting land use. The City closed the old landfill units and completed the landfill caps by 1993. That same year, the City began long-term treatment of groundwater. The City has since constructed an active waste disposal cell that meets all new state landfill requirements. The City plans to continue operations at this landfill until all remaining landfill cells reach capacity. EPA has discontinued groundwater pumping and treatment from the pilot extraction well and continues to monitor the perimeter and residential wells. City monitoring results show that drinking water standards are being met.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 6 people. For additional information click here.

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Northwest Transformer (South Harkness Street) Capped Site Reuse

The Northwest Transformer (South Harkness Street) Superfund site is located in Everson, Washington. The Northwest Transformer Service Company operated a transformer reclamation, storage and manufacturing facility on site until its bankruptcy in 1987. The company left behind a property contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1992, EPA began working closely with local government officials, the site’s potentially responsible parties and nearby residents to develop cleanup and reuse plans for the 1-acre property. By 1995, the potentially responsible parties had removed the contaminated soil and constructed a new parking lot. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. Today, the site provides much-needed parking space for the nearby town hall and an adjacent senior center.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Oeser Co. Capped Site Reuse

Little Squalicum Creek ParkOeser Co.The Oeser Co. Superfund site is located in a mixed residential and industrial area of Bellingham, Washington. The site includes the Oeser Company (Oeser) property (an active wood-treating facility) and the Little Squalicum Creek Area, located within Little Squalicum Park. Since 1943, Oeser has prepared and treated wood poles for utility companies on a 26-acre property. Treating practices resulted in soil and groundwater contaminated with various chemicals, including dioxin. In 1997, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2003, Oeser began removing or capping contaminated soils, placing use controls to limit groundwater use and non-industrial land use, and monitoring groundwater. Oeser completed the cleanup actions in 2009. In 2010, Oeser initiated cleanup of the creek area. Due to a lack of funds, EPA took over and completed the cleanup action of the creek area in 2011. Groundwater and surface water monitoring, as well as maintenance of the caps, continues.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 97 people and generated an estimated $14,077,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Pacific Sound Resources Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Container elevators at the Port of SeattlePacific Sound ResourcesThe Pacific Sound Resources Superfund site, formerly known as the Wyckoff West Seattle Wood Treating facility, is located on the south shore of Elliott Bay on the Puget Sound in Seattle, Washington. The site encompasses 83 acres, 58 acres of which are capped marine sediments. The surrounding areas are primarily commercial and industrial. From the turn of the century until 1994, a wood treating facility operating on site released creosote and related hazardous contaminants into the ground and marine environment. Contaminants eventually seeped into the tidal sediments. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup actions included removing soil, dredging sediment, constructing an upland slurry wall, placing a 25-acre asphalt cap in the upland and a 58-acre cap over marine sediments. The Port of Seattle purchased the upland property in 1994 and included it as part of the Port’s efforts to construct a modern container terminal facility in West Seattle. During this period, the Port implemented several early cleanup actions, under EPA oversight, to stabilize releases from the site and to prepare it for reuse. The Port is currently using the southern portion of the upland property as part of the Port’s container terminal facility. EPA and the Port worked together to redevelop the northern portion into a Port of Seattle waterfront park, known as Jack Block Park. In 2015, public access opened to beach areas of the park. Routine monitoring of the marine sediment cap and remaining contaminated groundwater continues.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. EPA did not have further economic details related to these businesses. For additional information click here.

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Palermo Well Field Ground Water Contamination

The Palermo Well Field Groundwater Contamination Superfund site is located in Tumwater, Washington. The site spans about three-quarters of a mile. It consists of three identified sources and corresponding plumes. Sampling detected contamination in three city drinking water wells in 1998. Identified sources include former and current Washington Department of Transportation facilities and a dry cleaner. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1997. Cleanup activities included installing a system to extract vapor from soil beneath the dry-cleaning facility, using an air stripper to treat drinking water, putting in an underground drainage system, and monitoring air in houses above the contaminated groundwater. EPA is working with the Washington State Department of Transportation on further investigations to determine if additional cleanup is necessary. Commercial and residential areas are located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 136 people and generated an estimated $4,458,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Queen City Farms Capped Site Reuse

capped areaQueen City FarmsThe Queen City Farms Superfund site is located in Maple Valley, Washington. The 324-acre site is immediately south of the King County Cedar Hills Landfill. Previous site uses included a pig farm, an airport, a chemical processing plant and a waste disposal area. From 1955 to the late 1960s, operators disposed of industrial waste in two on-site ponds. Site operators also buried drums containing various industrial wastes around the property. Improper waste disposal practices contaminated site groundwater, surface water and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Queen City Farms, the current site owner, and The Boeing Company conducted cleanup activities, with oversight from EPA. Responsible parties removed and disposed of wastes and drums, and constructed a cap to secure wastes remaining at the site. Cleanup activities also addressed contamination in surface water and groundwater. Long-term groundwater monitoring continues. Today the site is in ecological reuse, supporting wetlands and wooded wildlife habitat areas. A regional composting business uses about 26 acres of the site to recycle organic materials into soil.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 40 people and generated an estimated $9,395,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Silver Mountain Mine Capped Site Reuse

cattle grazingSilver Mountain MineThe 5-acre Silver Mountain Mine Superfund site is an abandoned silver and gold mine located in Horse Springs Coulee, Washington. From 1902 until the 1960s, the Silver Mountain Mine operated periodically, producing small amounts of silver and gold. From 1980 to 1981, speculators returned to the mine and used chemicals to extract precious metals from the old ore tailings. By July 1981, speculators abandoned the operation. They left behind more than 7,000 tons of cyanide-laced mine tailings and a basin filled with 20,000 gallons of cyanide-contaminated water. In November 1981, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) investigated the site. Ecology treated the cyanide-contaminated water in 1982. EPA then listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA closed the mine entrance and placed the contaminated mine tailings under a protective cap. With the capped area fenced off, EPA revegetated the land around the mine. A partnership between EPA, the State of Washington, the local community and a local rancher resulted in a cleanup that made it possible to once again use portions of the site as grazing land for cattle. In 1997, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Use of the site for grazing continues. The state continues to perform annual inspections and maintenance of the site’s cap.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Spokane Junkyard/Associated Properties Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

The 16-acre Spokane Junkyard/Associated Properties Superfund site is located in Spokane, Washington. The Spokane Junkyard accepted military surplus items, automobiles, heavy equipment, appliances and electrical transformers from the 1940s until the 1980s. In 1987, an explosive fire destroyed the junkyard. During an investigation, EPA found heavy metals in the soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. EPA and the site’s responsible parties removed asbestos, contaminated soil and waste, and covered the area. Parties completed these activities in 1997, and EPA took the site off the NPL. After cleanup, the Bemiss Neighborhood Council worked to identify reuses for the site property could best serve the needs of the Spokane community. The Spokane Youth Sports Association headed a team to plan, fund and build a multi-use sports complex for area youth. The association coordinated redevelopment with EPA to ensure that the site’s remedy remained and was in line with the site’s land use restrictions. Completed in 2002, the Andrew Rypien Field sports complex includes a baseball field and soccer fields. Recipient of the national Phoenix Community Impact Award in 2004 for achievement of excellence in Superfund site reuse, the complex serves over 4,500 neighborhood children.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Toftdahl Drums

The 15-acre Toftdahl Drums Superfund site is located in Brush Prairie, Washington. In the early 1970s, the property owner cleaned drums for resale, and reportedly had drums of industrial waste delivered to the property. Unsalvageable drums buried at the site contaminated soil, surface water and groundwater. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA and the state investigated the site and removed and disposed of all contaminated soils. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1988. Developers have since built eight single-family homes on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Vancouver Water Station #1 Contamination Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Vancouver Water Station #1 Contamination Superfund site is located in Vancouver, Washington, just north of Portland. Several well fields on site supply drinking water to about 150,000 people throughout the Vancouver area. In 1988, the City of Portland discovered traces of chemical dry cleaning liquids in wells at the station. An initial inspection to identify the contamination source occurred in 1990, but the source remains undetermined. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. The City of Vancouver built a groundwater treatment system that uses air stripping techniques to separate contaminants from the water. Construction reached completion in 1998. The City of Vancouver continues to own and operate a water station at the site with new groundwater wells and storage reservoirs.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Vancouver Water Station #4 Contamination

The Vancouver Water Station #4 Contamination Superfund site is located in Vancouver, Washington, just north of Portland. Several well fields on site supply drinking water to approximately 150,000 people throughout the Vancouver area. In 1988, the City of Portland discovered traces of chemical dry-cleaning liquids in wells at the station. An initial inspection to identify the contamination source occurred in 1990, but the source remains undetermined. EPA added the site to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. The City of Vancouver built a groundwater treatment system that uses air-stripping techniques to separate contaminants from the water. Construction reached completion in 1998. The City of Vancouver continues to own and operate a water station at the site with new groundwater wells and storage reservoirs.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Western Processing Co., Inc.

The 13-acre Western Processing Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Kent, Washington. From 1961 to 1983, a recycling and reclamation business operated on site. Its operations resulted in soil, groundwater and sediment contamination. EPA added the site to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil, surface structures and debris, groundwater treatment, sediment removal, and placement of a cap to prevent stormwater infiltration. Operation and maintenance activities and monitoring are ongoing. A roadway extends over a portion of the capped area of the site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wyckoff Co./Eagle Harbor Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Bainbridge Island WWII Nikkei Exclusion MemorialWyckoff Co./Eagle HarborThe Wyckoff Co./Eagle Harbor Superfund site is located on Bainbridge Island, west of Seattle in Puget Sound, Washington. For nearly a century, a wood treatment facility and a shipyard operated at the site. Years of site operations contaminated soil, groundwater and the bottom sediments of the adjacent Eagle Harbor. In 1987, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL), and divided the site into three areas for cleanup. East Harbor includes more than 70 acres of bottom sediments and beaches on the south side of Eagle Harbor. The bottom sediments became heavily contaminated with creosote released from the former wood treatment plant. EPA, working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, obtained clean sand from a river dredging project and used the sand to bury, or “cap,” contaminated portions of the harbor in 1994. EPA added several extensions to the cap in later years. EPA regularly monitors the condition of the cap. In 2012, EPA found that part of the cap in the middle of the harbor had eroded, exposing contaminated sediment below. EPA completed repairs to 9 acres of the sediment cap in 2017. The remainder of the cap is in good condition. It provides clean habitat that supports a diverse population of fish, crabs, clams and shorebirds. The former Wyckoff Wood Treatment Plant is located on the south side of Eagle Harbor. The plant processed wood for use as railroad ties, utility poles, pier pilings and other outdoor structures. Soil and groundwater in the area became heavily contaminated with creosote and other chemicals over nearly 100 years of operations. Today, a steel sheet pile around the outer edge of the site prevents the contamination from moving into Eagle Harbor. Groundwater extraction and treatment prevents contamination from moving into the lower aquifer below the site. EPA has been studying additional cleanup options, and proposed additional cleanup work for this area in 2016. Post cleanup, the site will become part of an adjacent city park and provide more than 15 acres of open space with spectacular views of Puget Sound and the Seattle skyline. The City of Bainbridge Island purchased the site property from EPA in 2007 for use as a park. The City converted the beach west of the former treatment plant and the hillside behind it to park land, as part of Pritchard Park. West Beach is a popular recreation area used by beachgoers, dog-walkers, kayakers and paddle boarders. The wooded hillside above the beach features a network of hiking trails. The westernmost portion of the park is now the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial. Bainbridge Island was home to many Japanese Americans who were sent to internment camps during World War II. The Memorial is located on the site of a former ferry dock, where detainees boarded boats to Seattle on their way to the camps. The Memorial includes several paths and a 276-foot-long memorial wall – one foot for each relocated resident. West Harbor is a former shipyard. At this part of the site, EPA worked with the State to dismantle on-site buildings and remove polluted sediments. Remedial workers placed the most-polluted sediments inside a partially submerged containment facility. Crews then paved over the containment facility. Today, the area is a maintenance yard for Washington State Ferries. EPA and the State of Washington conduct regular inspections and sampling of the area to make sure the remedy continues to protect adjacent marine habitat. Runners and cyclists use a trail that runs along the edge of the area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. EPA did not have further economic details related to these businesses. For additional information click here.

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Yakima Plating Co.

The 2-acre Yakima Plating Company Superfund site is located in Yakima, Washington. Since 1962, Yakima Plating has electroplated bumpers for cars and other objects on the property and disposed of wastewaters in an on-site drain field. Operations contaminated groundwater and soil on site. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1991, EPA funded and conducted an early action removal and disposed of contaminated soil. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1994. Yakima Plating continues to operate its electroplating facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 11 people and generated an estimated $519,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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