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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Wisconsin

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Eau Claire Municipal Well Field Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Eau Claire Municipal Well Field Superfund site is located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In the 1980s, routine groundwater sampling by the state of Wisconsin found chemicals in the municipal water supply. EPA determined that the nearby National Presto Industries Superfund site was the source of the contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The site consists of 16 municipal groundwater wells in two well fields. These two well fields provide drinking water to about 60,000 residential and commercial users. Cleanup activities included providing an alternate water source to affected residents and treating contaminated groundwater. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2014.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Fox River NRDA/PCB Releases

The 1,669-acre Fox River NRDA/PCB Releases site is located in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Paper-mill operations contaminated sediments across a 39-mile stretch of the Fox River and Green Bay with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). EPA proposed the site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. EPA and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources are overseeing the cleanup activities. Cleanup has included dredging river sediments and capping some contamination in place. Dredging completion is scheduled for the end of 2019, with some minor capping planned for 2020. Settlement funds supported projects to build fishing piers, trails and a boat launch. Cleanup also included ecological restoration work along portions of the Fox River. This work included restoration of wild rice areas on the Menominee Indian Reservation, restoration of the Cat Island Chain, wetland and stream restoration, and fishery improvements to increase populations of native fish.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Kohler Co. Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 82-acre Kohler Co. Landfill Superfund site is located in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. Since the 1950s, the Kohler Company’s manufacturing facilities used 40 acres of the site for the disposal of foundry and manufacturing wastes. Between 1950 and the 1970s, operators put in at least four pits for the disposal of oils, solvents and other wastes. Improper waste disposal resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included landfill capping; groundwater and landfill wastewater collection; and zoning and access restrictions. The city of Sheboygan’s water treatment facility treats contaminated groundwater and landfill wastewater and then discharges the clean water. The landfill will continue to accept non-hazardous industrial waste generated by the Kohler Company’s manufacturing facilities through 2020. Part of the site is a staging area for waste products, including pottery cull and foundry sand, until they can be shipped off site for beneficial reuse projects.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Murray Machinery Incorporated Capped Site Reuse

The 138-acre Murray Machinery Incorporated Superfund site is located in Stettin, Wisconsin. A foundry on site primarily produced gray iron castings for the paper industry. Between 1966 and 1988, site operators disposed of foundry wastes in a landfill at the site and stored wastewater from emission control processes on site. In 1993, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) discovered contamination in site soils, surface water, sediment and groundwater. Leaking underground storage tanks found on site also contaminated soil. Murray Machinery installed a soil vapor extraction system. In 1994, EPA removed contaminated sediments and capped portions of the landfill. Wisconsin DNR covered the landfill with an asphalt cap and monitored groundwater. Brownfield Investments, LLC purchased the property after the completion of site cleanup activities. Currently, the site supports non-metallic mining, a sand and gravel business, an insulation distribution company and a wood truss manufacturing facility. A manufacturer of attachments for heavy equipment also leases a portion of the site’s refurbished foundry building.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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National Presto Industries, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 320-acre National Presto Industries Inc. Superfund site is located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The federal government purchased the site property in the 1940s to manufacture radar tubes and ordnance chemicals for the war effort. National Presto Industries Inc. (NPI) acquired the property in 1947 and began manufacturing household appliances, outboard motors, aircraft parts, artillery shells and other defense-related products. Beginning in 1966, operators landfilled waste products on site, which led to groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. NPI, the site’s potentially responsible party, put a groundwater extraction system in place and started operating it in 1987. NPI also connected affected residents to the public water supply in 1991 and capped contaminated wastes. Contracts between National Defense Corporation (NDC), an NPI subsidiary, and the U.S. Department of Defense ended in 1992. NPI dismantled most equipment on site but continues to use the site in a limited capacity. Remaining buildings are currently in use as warehousing, diaper manufacturing facilities and production facilities for medical devices. In addition, the vegetation over the capped area is being used for animal feed. Groundwater extraction and soil vapor extraction are ongoing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 512 people and generated an estimated $76,870,114 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Northern Engraving Co. Capped Site Reuse

The Northern Engraving Co. Superfund site in Sparta, Wisconsin, is located next to homes, businesses and the La Crosse River. Past wastewater treatment and disposal practices at the site resulted in soil, surface water and groundwater contamination. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included the removal and consolidation of contaminated soil and sludge and lagoon capping. Access to the site is restricted and deed use restrictions are in place. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. Northern Engraving Corporation continues to make metal nameplates, dials and decorative trim for the automotive industry on the 40-acre property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 300 people and generated an estimated $30,000,000 in annual sales revenue.  For additional information click here.

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Northwestern Barrel

The Northwestern Barrel Superfund site occupies 18 acres on the Lake Michigan shoreline in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The site includes 13 acres of vacant property and a 5-acre residential area. A barrel reconditioning facility operated on the property from the early 1940s to 1964. Site operations included handling, washing and refurbishing steel drums and wooden barrels. These activities contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA did not place the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). However, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) have led cleanup activities under EPA and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources supervision. The PRPs removed contaminated soil and waste. Cleanup workers also installed drain tile depressurization systems in on-site condominium buildings. These systems collect any contaminated vapors from contaminated groundwater under the buildings and safely vent them away. These systems remain in operation. The PRPs also restored wetlands along the Lake Michigan shoreline and put erosion controls in place. The PRPs finished cleanup activities in 2012. The city of South Milwaukee owns the vacant part of the site. Residential use on the rest of the site – Marina Cliffs Condominiums – is ongoing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Refuse Hideaway Landfill

The 23-acre Refuse Hideaway Landfill Superfund site is in Middleton, Wisconsin. The landfill received commercial and industrial waste products between 1974 and 1988. Chemicals seeped out of the landfill, contaminating groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources completed cleanup in 1998. This included improvements to the existing landfill cap, maintenance of the cap, collection systems for landfill gas and fluids, and treatment systems for properties with contaminated groundwater. The state continues monitoring the cap and the groundwater. A solar array installed at the site in 2010 helps power site cleanup equipment. A street improvement construction company currently uses an area next to the site for parking and storing trucks and equipment.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Tomah Armory Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 10-acre Tomah Armory Superfund site is located in Tomah, Wisconsin. Tomah city government operated an open, unlined landfill on site from the late 1940s until 1955. Landfill operations resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. The local government sold part of the site property to the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs in 1968 for construction of the Wisconsin Army National Guard armory. The armory supports activities associated with the unit’s administration, logistical support and readiness. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities included land use restrictions, connections to the public water supply and groundwater monitoring. Cap maintenance is ongoing. The armory remains active on site. The site also supports other uses, including a consulting company, a wastewater treatment plant operated by the local government, a fire station and an ambulance station. In 2016, EPA documented that all site cleanup standards have been met. EPA took the site off the NPL on February 5, 2019.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 59 people and generated an estimated $982,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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WPSC Stevens Point

The 3-acre Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC) Stevens Point site is in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. WPSC owned and operated a manufactured gas plant at the site from the 1890s to the late 1940s. Deep soil and groundwater are contaminated with coal tar and other contaminants related to the former gas plant operations. Sampling indicated that surface soil is clean. WPSC (now Intergys) completed cleanup under EPA oversight in 2016. Cleanup included digging up and covering river and pond sediment, limiting site use, prohibiting groundwater use and monitoring natural recovery of groundwater. The 1.5-acre former gas plant area is currently a vacant field. Parts of a city park and a municipal parking lot are also on site. In 2008, Stevens Point shared a redevelopment plan for the site. The planned project would expand city park facilities on site and reconfigure public roads across the site for easier access.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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