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Smart Growth

2007 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet

Cover to the 2007 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet
Download the 2007 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet (PDF)
Central Park, New York City. Photo courtesy of Brett Van Akkeren

Through the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement, EPA recognizes and supports communities that use innovative policies and strategies to strengthen their economies, provide housing and transportation choices, develop in ways that bring benefits to a wide range of residents, and protect the environment.

The 2007 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet includes:

  • A message from the EPA Administrator
  • How smart growth protects the environment
  • About the award
  • Descriptions and photographs of each award winner

The winners are:

  • Overall Excellence
    Corner fruit stand
    Amenities such as a local grocery store and wide sidewalks improve access for residents of all ages. Photo courtesy of award winner.

    New Columbia: Building Community Together
    Housing Authority of Portland, Portland, Oregon

    The Housing Authority of Portland partnered with public and private stakeholders to redevelop an isolated and distressed public housing site into New Columbia, a neighborhood built to improve economic opportunity, community livability, and environmental quality for both old and new residents.

    For an update on this project, see the “How Smart Growth Protects the Environment” section of the 2011 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement booklet.

     

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  • Built Projects
    Community garden next to Seattle housing development
    The creation of local community gardens builds a strong sense of place. Photo courtesy of award winner.

    High Point Redevelopment
    Seattle Housing Authority, Seattle, Washington

    The Seattle Housing Authority worked closely with community members to rebuild a formerly crime-ridden and dilapidated 120-acre hilltop neighborhood into a mixed-use, mixed-income, and environmentally sensitive community.

    For an update on this project, see the 2009 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement booklet.

     

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  • Policies and Regulations
    Man walking along Vermont water front
    Utilizing VHCB's tools and funding, city officials created the Urban Reserve, which includes conservation easements — allowing limited development and improving access to the waterfront. Photo courtesy of award winner.

    Vermont Housing and Conservation Board
    State of Vermont

    The state of Vermont promotes compact settlements surrounded by rural countryside. The Vermont Housing and Conservation Board supports this goal by funding affordable housing development in existing population centers and by preserving historic resources, farmland, forests, and public access to recreational lands.

    For an update on this project, see the 2008 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement booklet.

     

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  • Waterfront and Coastal Communities
    Aerial view of Main Street Hyannis
    The implementation of mixed-use redevelopment along Main Street has attracted residents and visitors back to downtown Hyannis. Photo courtesy of award winner.

    Balanced Growth through Downtown Revitalization
    Town of Barnstable, Hyannis, Massachusetts

    Public space and streetscape improvements have been integral in the revitalization of Hyannis. The redevelopment plan has reconnected residents to the waterfront and downtown by creating pedestrian-friendly walkways.

    For an update on this project, see the 2008 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement booklet.


     

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  • Equitable Development
    Abyssinian Neighborhood Project
    The Borough of Manhattan, Harlem, New York
     
     Laura B. Thomas House
    Redevelopment projects, such as the Laura B. Thomas House, provide affordable housing for families on fixed incomes, while returning the building to productive use. Photo courtesy of award winner.
    The Abyssinian Neighborhood Project area, located in Manhattan, was once marked by vacant lots and abandoned buildings. The Abyssinian Development Corporation launched a community development initiative to increase affordable housing options, revitalize the business corridor, and expand job training opportunities to the community.

    For an update on this project, see the 2010 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement booklet.

     

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