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Smart Growth

2012 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet

2012 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Cover Photo
Download the 2012 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet (PDF). Hard copies available by emailing nscep@lmsolas.com or calling (800) 490-9198 and requesting EPA-231-K-12-002.

Through the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement, EPA recognizes and supports communities that use innovative policies and strategies to strengthen their economies, provide housing and transportation choices, develop in ways that bring benefits to a wide range of residents, and protect the environment.

The 2012 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Booklet includes:

  • A message from the EPA Administrator
  • About the award
  • How smart growth protects the environment
  • Descriptions and photographs of each award winner

The winners are:

  • Overall Excellence
    Downtown BLVD
    The BLVD is now a downtown destination and hosts regional and community events ever year, like BooLVD Halloween and Harvest Festival. Photo courtesy of City of Lancaster.

    The BLVD Transformation
    Lancaster, CA

    A dilapidated downtown corridor has been transformed into a lively, mixed-use district through investments in the streetscape, housing, and business development, bringing jobs, economic growth, and community revitalization.
     

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  • Main Street or Corridor Revitalization
    The Cooperative Building's green features
    The Cooperative Building's many green features include permeable pavers outside the store entrance, a green roof, and an energy-efficient heating and cooling system. Photo courtesy of Gossens Bachman Architects.

    The Cooperative Building
    Brattleboro, VT

    A new, energy-efficient, multi-story building with a food co-op, affordable apartments, and innovative, money-saving environmental features has contributed to the vibrancy of Brattleboro's Main Street while promoting healthy living.

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The Larkin District has a number of public plazas and restaurants that bring new life into a formerly industrial area. Photo courtesy of Larkin Development Group.
  • Main Street or Corridor Revitalization: Honorable Mention
    The Larkin District
    Buffalo, New York

    The rehabilitation of a warehouse building and public spaces has sparked widespread revitalization and redevelopment of a mixed-use district that reconnects a historic neighborhood to the rest of the city.

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  • Programs and Policies
    Destination Portsmouth is making streets throughout the city more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly. Photo courtesy of EPA.

    Destination Portsmouth
    Portsmouth, VA

    A comprehensive overhaul of development and land use regulations has begun to realize the community's vision for a livable and pedestrian-friendly city while providing additional opportunities for economic development and reinvestment.

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The Eddy & Taylor Building will provide housing for low-income households, plus a ground-floor grocery store to serve the community. Photo courtesy of David Baker + Partners, Architects.
  • Programs and Policies: Honorable Mention
    Bay Area Transit-Oriented Affordable Housing Fund
    San Francisco Bay Area, California

    A $50-million revolving fund provides loans for investments in affordable, transit-accessible housing options in an area struggling with high housing costs.

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  • Equitable Development
    Mariposa is home to a diverse group of residents who benefit from neighborhood events, nearby amenities, and proximity to public transit. Photo courtesy of Denver Housing Authority.

    The Mariposa District
    Denver, CO

    A community-oriented master plan strengthens a transit-accessible, diverse Denver neighborhood through the construction of affordable housing, health improvements, and educational services for residents.
     

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Northwest Gardens' 7,000-square-foot urban farm generates $1,000 worth of vegetables per week and sells food to local restaurants and residents. Photo courtesy of Carlisle Development Group.
  • Equitable Development: Honorable Mention
    Northwest Gardens
    Fort Lauderdale, FL

    After decades of disinvestment, a downtown neighborhood becomes a robust, sustainable, self-sufficient community with affordable homes, workforce training, community gardens, and civic pride.
     

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