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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Delaware

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Army Creek Landfill Capped Site Reuse

A new vibrant wildlife area on the siteArmy Creek LandfillThe 50-acre Army Creek Landfill Superfund site is located in New Castle, Delaware. From 1960 to 1968, potentially responsible parties (PRPs) operated a municipal and industrial waste landfill on site. The landfill contaminated soil, groundwater, nearby Army Creek and local water supply wells. In 1973, the landfill owner installed groundwater recovery wells to protect nearby public water supply wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s PRPs excavated over 100 buried drums containing chemical wastes and disposed of them off site, built a multi-layer cap over the landfill, and installed a facility to treat extracted groundwater prior to its discharge to Army Creek. PRPs completed cleanup construction activities in 1994. The water treatment facility treated contaminated groundwater until 2004, when EPA approved shutdown of the groundwater recovery system. Collaboration among EPA, local natural resource trustees, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, and the PRP group incorporated wildlife habitat as part of the multi-layer cap design. Stakeholders planted grasses and vegetation to encourage visits by migratory birds and added bird boxes to encourage nesting. Sedimentation basin outlet structures manage runoff, prevent flooding and create standing wetlands. The wetlands prevent erosion and surface water runoff and provide valuable habitat for plants and animals.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Chem-Solv, Inc.

The 1.5-acre Chem-Solv Superfund site is located in Dover, Delaware. From 1981 to 1984, Chem-Solv, Inc. operated solvent activities on site. These activities contaminated groundwater. Groundwater extraction and treatment began in 1997. In 2017, groundwater sampling showed contaminant concentrations had dropped below cleanup levels, and groundwater extraction and treatment was discontinued. Routine groundwater monitoring continues to be conducted to verify groundwater concentrations remain below cleanup levels. Several structures are located on site. They include a residential building, a barn, a shed and the former Chem-Solv, Inc. office building.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Delaware City PVC Plant Capped Site Reuse

The 200-acre Delaware City PVC Plant Superfund site is located in New Castle County, Delaware. A polyvinyl chloride (PVC) manufacturing plant began operating on site in 1966. Site operators dumped PVC waste into lagoons and used another area to bury off-grade PVC sludge. Waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of groundwater under the site. Local residents, businesses and farms use groundwater for drinking water and other purposes. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included pumping and treating contaminated groundwater, removing off-grade materials and contaminated soil for off-site disposal, and capping the buried sludge pits. The groundwater treatment system began operating in 1991. Discovery of a second groundwater contamination plume required installation of more extraction wells and piping in 2001. A portion of the second plume has migrated beneath a neighboring petroleum refinery. This portion of the plume is not being addressed by the existing pump-and-treat system. An investigation to determine how to address this part of the plume is ongoing. Cleanup also included connecting businesses and residences near the western portion of the site to the public water supply. The PVC manufacturing plant continues to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Delaware Sand & Gravel Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 27-acre Delaware Sand & Gravel Landfill Superfund site is located in New Castle, Delaware. Between 1968 and 1976, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of in unlined gravel pits at the site. Leachate from the disposal areas contaminated groundwater. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included the removal of waste drums, capping of waste disposal areas, bioventing of contaminated soil, and pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater. Caps were installed over a 16-acre portion of the site. EPA and the site’s potentially responsible parties worked with the site owner to design a special "wear-surface" for a 5-acre portion of a landfill cap to enable its reuse. A storage area for impounded vehicles, propane tanks and salvage materials is now located on top of the cap. The owner of the site property also maintains a residence on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Dover Gas Light Co. Capped Site Reuse

Dover Gas Light Co.Dover Gas Light Co.The 23-acre Dover Gas Light Co. Superfund site is located in Dover, Delaware. From 1859 to 1948, the Dover Gas Light Company processed coal on site for use in city street lamps. Site operators buried process materials containing coal tar residues on site, contaminating soil and groundwater. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) have conducted cleanup activities under the oversight of EPA and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control since 1989. These activities included removing and treating contaminated soil and groundwater and capping the site. Studies to address remaining groundwater contamination are ongoing. Today, the cap over a 1-acre portion of the site serves as a paved parking lot for the Victrola Museum. Several businesses and public service facilities are also located on site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 68 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,606 people and generated an estimated $33,865,728 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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E.I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co., Inc. (Newport Pigment Plant Landfill) Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Solar panels on the South Landfill areaE.I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co., Inc. (Newport Pigment Plant)The E.I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co., Inc. (Newport Pigment Plant Landfill) Superfund site is in Newport, Delaware. It consists of a pigment manufacturing plant and two industrial landfills. Plant operations and waste disposal practices contaminated groundwater and soil as well as adjacent wetlands and the Christina River. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). DuPont conducted cleanup activities under the oversight of EPA and Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Cleanup included removing contaminated soil and sediment, and installing a municipal water line for nearby residents. DuPont completed cleanup in 2002. Operation and maintenance activities are ongoing. Today, restored wetlands provide valuable ecological habitat and much of the property is in reuse or continued use. The BASF Corporation, formerly Ciba-Geigy, owns and continues to operate the pigment manufacturing plant. The State purchased part of one of the landfills for a highway construction project. Tangent Energy also worked with DuPont and Greenwood Energy on a 5-acre solar farm. The 548-kilowatt solar farm generates about 729,000 kilowatt hours of energy each year, enough to power about 60 homes. The solar farm reduces Newport’s greenhouse gas emissions by 350 tons a year.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 417 people and generated an estimated $383,412,67 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Halby Chemical Co. Capped Site Reuse

Halby Chemical Co.Halby Chemical Co.The Halby Chemical Co. Superfund site is located in an industrial area of the Port of Wilmington in New Castle, Delaware. From 1948 to 1980, a chemical manufacturing plant operated at the 9-acre site. Operators discharged wastewater from the plant into an unlined lagoon. Wastewater then flowed through a tidal marsh and the Lobdell Canal into the Christina River, contaminating sediments and groundwater. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included treating contaminated soil on site and placing protective covers over contaminated soil and sediment remaining on site. It also included filling in degraded wetlands, creating new wetlands at an off-site location, and placing drinking water restrictions on wells near the site. Monitoring activities are ongoing. Commercial uses related to trucking and transportation services remain active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 16 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 65 people and generated an estimated $10,636,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Harvey & Knott Drum, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 20-acre Harvey & Knott Drum, Inc. Superfund site is in Kirkwood, Delaware. From 1963 to 1969, Harvey & Knott Drum, Inc. operated an open dump and burning area on site. The facility accepted sanitary, municipal and industrial wastes. Wastes included sludge, paint pigments and solvents. Site operators dumped wastes onto the ground or into trenches, left waste in drums, and buried waste. These activities resulted in contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil and sediment. The surrounding area is densely populated and area residents depend on private shallow wells for water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included draining water from the on-site pond, removing and disposing of drums off site, removing contaminated soil and sediment, capping remaining contaminated soils, and groundwater and surface water monitoring. Groundwater monitoring and maintenance of the monitoring system and cap are ongoing. A paintball recreation facility is currently located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 16 people and generated an estimated $773,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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NCR Corp. (Millsboro Plant)

The 140-acre NCR Corp. (Millsboro Plant) Superfund site is located in Millsboro, Delaware. From 1967 to 1980, National Cash Register (NCR) made cash registers and other electronic devices on site. Wastes from plating operations discharged into on-site concrete lagoons. Operators disposed of sludge that accumulated in the lagoons in a pit and spilled industrial solvents on site. In the early 1980s, First Omni Bank purchased part of the site property and converted the manufacturing building into a records storage and call center. After site investigations identified groundwater contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Groundwater pumping and treatment began at the site in 1988. An air sparging and soil vapor extraction system was added to the remedy in 1996. This system was expanded in 1998. Groundwater restoration technologies including chemical oxidation and enhanced bioremediation were add to the remedy in 2016. First Omni Bank – now M&T Bank – remained open during the cleanup process and remains active on site today.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 6 people and generated an estimated $2,314,286 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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New Castle Spill

The 6-acre New Castle Spill Superfund site is located in New Castle, Delaware. Witco Chemical Company processed materials used to make plastic foam at the site. The company stored large quantities of chemical waste in drums. After a chemical spill led to soil and groundwater contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA worked with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) on a cleanup plan that would allow for site reuse. The City of New Castle provided an alternate water supply to residents affected by groundwater contamination. Witco, the site’s potentially responsible party, placed controls on groundwater use at the site and started monitoring groundwater. In 1996, after groundwater achieved cleanup goals and groundwater monitoring ended, EPA took the site off the NPL. Witco donated the site property to the City of New Castle. The City invested over $700,000 to renovate a historic trolley barn on site and convert it into office space for the New Castle Public Works Department.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 28 people and generated an estimated $140,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Sealand Limited Capped Site Reuse

The Sealand Limited Superfund site covers a 0.8-acre area in Middletown, Delaware. Sealand Limited and Oil Industry operated a creosote manufacturing plant and a coal tar, gas tar and ink oil storage and recycling facility on site for about a year, ending in 1983. Leaking tanks and drums contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA removed coal tar, waste oil drums and solid waste from the site. Following removal of waste oil storage tanks, EPA capped soil with a foot of clay and 6 inches of top soil. In 1997, EPA took the site off the NPL. A warehouse facility currently operates on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Tybouts Corner Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Pigeon Run CreekTybouts Corner LandfillThe 47-acre Tybouts Corner Landfill Superfund site is located in New Castle, Delaware. A sand-and-gravel quarry operated at the site until 1968, when the New Castle Department of Public Works converted the area into a landfill. The landfill accepted municipal and household waste until 1971. The landfill waste contaminated groundwater at the site. Investigations also found contamination in two drinking water wells. In response, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities. The PRPs installed water lines to connect residents with affected wells to the public water supply. The PRPs also capped the landfill and put groundwater extraction and gas collection systems in place. Groundwater extraction ended in 2007. The PRPs used wildflowers and native grasses to stabilize the ground and prevent erosion on the landfill cap. The site is now a wildlife habitat area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Tyler Refrigeration Pit

The 3-acre Tyler Refrigeration Pit Superfund site is located near Smyrna, Delaware. Beginning in the 1940s, a succession of refrigeration companies operated a refrigerator manufacturing plant on site. Companies used solvents to degrease and clean refrigeration equipment. Operators disposed of spent solvents, paint wastes and sludge in two unlined disposal pits. Between 1973 and 1975, site owners excavated and removed the contents of the lagoons. In 1977, routine testing identified solvents in Smyrna’s municipal drinking water wells, which could have come from the site or other nearby sources. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included groundwater monitoring to ensure contaminants did not migrate off site. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2004. The current site owner, Harris Manufacturing Company, no longer operates on the site. However, one of its affiliates is active on site, manufacturing apparel.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on two on-site businesses. These businesses employed 7 people and generated an estimated $6,334,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Wildcat Landfill Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Wildcat LandfillWildcat LandfillThe Wildcat Landfill Superfund site is located south of Dover, Delaware, near the St. Jones River. A 44-acre landfill operated on site from 1962 to 1973, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater. In December 1982, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The potentially responsible parties (PRPs) installed a protective cover over the landfill and planted wildflowers and native plants on top of the cover. The cleanup also restored natural habitat along the banks of the St. Jones River, an area formerly covered by tires, trash and barrels of hazardous waste. After cleanup finished, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2003. In 2005, Kent County purchased several parcels of land, including the site, for reuse as a county conservation area, greenway, museum and archaeological area. In April 2015, Hunn Nature Park opened on site. The 173-acre park includes nature trails for walking, jogging and biking. Part of the St. Jones Greenway crosses the site, connecting area communities to the Delaware Bay. The site is also a cultural and historical resource. Wildcat Manor may have been part of the Underground Railroad and emancipated slaves may have lived on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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