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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Florida

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Agrico Chemical Co. Alternative Energy Reuse Pollinator Habitat Reuse

The 35-acre Agrico Chemical Company Superfund site is located in Pensacola, Florida. It includes an area where agrichemical production operations took place from 1889 to 1975. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 because of contaminated groundwater, sludge and soil resulting from facility operations. Cleanup actions by the site’s potentially responsible parties included soil removal, solidification, stabilization and capping. A water line connects residences and businesses to the public water supply. Parts of the site are in ecological reuse as pollinator habitat. The habitat area includes more than 1,700 plants. The site’s planting with pollinator-friendly vegetation also enhanced the remedy, preventing erosion around the engineered cap. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Airco Plating Co. Capped Site Reuse

Airco Plating Co.Airco Plating Co.The 2-acre Airco Plating Company Superfund site is part of a commercial and industrial area in Miami, Florida. A metal plating facility has operated on site since 1955. Waste handling practices contaminated soil and groundwater with metals and hazardous chemicals. The main threat posed by the site is the release of contaminants into the Biscayne Aquifer, the main source of drinking water for Miami-Dade County. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA’s 1993 cleanup plan included extracting vapors from contaminated soil, capping remaining contaminated soil and treating groundwater. Land use restrictions make sure that site activities do not damage the protective cap or affect the groundwater treatment system. Airco Plating Company continues to operate on site. The company provides plating services to aviation, aerospace and commercial industries. Paradise Awnings operates a small part of its business on the southern portion of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 35 people and generated an estimated $4,300,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Alaric Area GW Plume

The 1.7-acre Alaric Area GW Plume Superfund site is located in the Orient Park area of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. It includes the former Alaric, Inc. property and several adjacent lots where contaminated groundwater migrated, including a vacant 3-acre lot to the south owned by Helena Chemical Company. From 1978 to 1981, a concrete company operated on site. It built, repaired and refurbished concrete mixing equipment. From 1981 to 1992, Alaric operated a plastics recycling business on site. Soil and groundwater monitoring by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection in the late 1990s found significant quantities of chlorinated solvents in soil and groundwater samples. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in December 2000. Since 2005, cleanup activities have included the removal of the shallow soil contamination and septic tank believed to be the main source of the chlorinated solvents, treatment of contaminated soil using chemical oxidation and thermal heating, and pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater. Currently, the property includes about 6,000-square-feet of shop space and 1,000-square-feet of office space. EPA hopes to have the final phase of soil treatment completed by late 2017. EPA will conduct further assessments of the groundwater to see if additional treatment will be necessary.
Last updated January 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Alpha Chemical Corp. Capped Site Reuse

The entrance to Alpha ChemicalAlpha Chemical Corp.The Alpha Chemical Corporation Superfund site is located in Lakeland, Florida. Since 1967, a plant on site has produced polyester resin for fiberglass manufacturers. From 1967 to 1976, plant operators discharged plant wastewater, which contained small amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), into an on-site pond. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included placing a protective cap over the former unlined pond area and monitoring surface water and groundwater. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. Monitoring results show that cleanup goals have been met. The plant continues to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 72 people and generated an estimated $67,756,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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American Creosote Works, Inc. (Pensacola Plant)

The 18-acre American Creosote Works, Inc. (Pensacola Plant) Superfund site is located in Pensacola, Florida. A wood-treating facility operated at the site from 1902 to 1981, when it filed for bankruptcy. Facility operators sent process wastewaters to four holding ponds on the western portion of the site. The ponds often overflowed after heavy rains. The company also collected and spread liquid wastes on the ground in designated "spillage areas." Investigations found that decades of improper waste handling resulted in contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA currently leads site investigation and cleanup activities in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. A restriction is in place to prevent well drilling and fencing around the facility prevents access to contaminated soil. While the site is currently vacant, the community has developed reuse plans for potential site uses. These plans, updated over time in coordination with the site’s cleanup, call for recreational and other land uses at the site in the future. The community last updated the site’s reuse plans in 2010.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp.

Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp.Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp.The 3-acre Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp. Superfund site is located in Miami, Florida. It consists of the adjacent 1-acre Anaconda and 2-acre Milgo sites. Anaconda Aluminum Company conducted electrochemical processing using acids and an aluminum-laden caustic base to produce a film of protective coating on aluminum. From 1961 to 1984, Milgo Electronics performed chrome, nickel and copper electroplating of data processing equipment, and made cabinets for electronic components. Both companies disposed of liquid wastes via on-site drain fields. Sampling in 1987 found cyanide and heavy metals in area groundwater. The widespread contamination resulted from former manufacturing and process waste disposal practices. Sediment, surface water and soils also contained heavy metals. The contaminated groundwater plume reached the Biscayne Aquifer, the primary source of drinking water for South Florida, resulting in EPA’s placement of the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included the excavation and proper disposal of contaminated soil. After groundwater monitoring verified the effectiveness of the removal action, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1998. The former Anaconda facility is now in reuse as a warehouse. The former Milgo Electronics facility serves as a base of operations for a boat manufacturing company.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 3 people and generated an estimated $1,175,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Anodyne, Inc.

The northeast corner of Site occupied by ATC Intl-Global Security, a global security firmAnodyne, Inc.The 4-acre Anodyne, Inc. Superfund site is located in Sunshine State Industrial Park in Miami Gardens, Florida. Between 1960 and 1978, Anodyne and other companies conducted a variety of industrial operations on site. Consumer products made at the facility included decorative trim, control panels and equipment dials. Site operators stored chemicals in aboveground tanks on site. They also disposed of wastes directly on the ground outside. Sources indicate that site operators may have disposed of waste in a deep on-site well. These improper storage and disposal practices contaminated groundwater and soil. The site overlies the Biscayne Aquifer, which is the primary source of drinking water for Miami-Dade and Broward counties. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. A 1993 cleanup plan included removal and replacement of contaminated soil as well as groundwater treatment and disposal. In 2016, EPA updated the remedy to address groundwater contamination. Groundwater treatment and long-term monitoring plans will be implemented once the design is completed. EPA Region 4’s Prospective Purchaser Inquiry (PPI) process supported the reuse of the site. The PPI process offers prospective purchasers fast, accurate and comprehensive information. Prospective purchasers are then able to make timely purchasing decisions. Today, several commercial businesses operate in the former Anodyne facility. They include a packaged snack distribution center, a security firm office, a heating and air conditioning distributor, a storage container manufacturer, and a parking facility.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 43 people and generated an estimated $8,469,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Arkla Terra Property

The Arkla Terra Property Superfund site is located in Thonotosassa, Florida. From 1976 to 2006, several companies repaired and refurbished containers and underground storage tanks on site. Operators used solvents to clean the tanks. In 2000, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) found that site activities had contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. EPA began cleanup in 2011. In February 2013, EPA completed treating the source area with heat to remove contamination from the subsurface. EPA continues to monitor groundwater quality. EPA is also continuing site investigations to evaluate the need for more cleanup activities. Today, several commercial businesses are located on site. These businesses include an accounting company, an automotive store, a landscaping business and an industrial concrete cutting company.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 13 people and generated an estimated $5,617,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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B&B Chemical Co., Inc.

Main entrance to the B and B facilityB&B Chemical Co., Inc.The 4.5-acre B&B Chemical Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Hialeah, Florida. In 1963, B&B Tritech (B&B) began making and mixing industrial cleaning products at the site. Many of the chemical containers rusted and broke, spilling their contents onto the ground. In 1981, construction workers working on a water pipe near the site reported skin irritation and burns. In 1985, an EPA investigation verified that facility operations and waste handling practices at the site had contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and began monitoring groundwater. As a result of treatment and monitoring, groundwater currently meets state and federal drinking water standards. Land use restrictions are in place to help prevent potential human exposure to site-related contaminants in the future. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2014. B&B continues to own the site property and make chemical cleaning compounds on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 32 people and generated an estimated $7,120,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Beulah Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The sign at the entrance of Fritz FieldBeulah LandfillThe 101-acre Beulah Landfill Superfund site is located in Escambia County, Florida. Escambia County operated a landfill on site from 1966 to 1984. A state investigation in 1987 found that site activities had contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s responsible party, Escambia County, is performing required cleanup activities. The cleanup approach is to close the landfill in accordance with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) landfill closure program. Landfill closure included capping, monitoring groundwater and removing contaminated soil located outside the capped areas. Land use controls limit future site development. In 1998, EPA took the site off the NPL. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Following reuse discussions in the community, Northwest Florida Modelers, a local model airplane club, came to an agreement with Escambia County to use the site for flying model airplanes. Today, the northern part of Beulah Landfill is known as Fritz Field, a model airplane flying park. Funds generated by the airplane club are used for maintenance of Fritz Field. Escambia County, EPA and FDEP converted this former landfill property into a valuable asset that provides open-space recreation opportunities for the community.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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BMI-Textron

Machinery inside the Florida Aero Precision facility at the BMI-Textron Superfund siteBMI-TextronThe 3.4-acre Basic Microelectronics, Inc. (BMI)-Textron Superfund site is located in Lake Park, Florida. BMI began manufacturing operations in Tri-City Industrial Park in 1969. Textron purchased BMI in 1981. BMI-Textron made chromium-backed glass plates used in electronic parts. Site operators disposed of liquid process waste containing cyanide in on-site ponds and drain fields. In 1984, a state investigation found that site activities had contaminated soil and groundwater. The business closed in early 1986. The site’s potentially responsible party, BMI-Textron, cleaned up contaminated soil in 1984 and 1990. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities also included groundwater monitoring and site access restrictions. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in November 2002. Commercial and light industrial use continued at the site during cleanup. Today, Florida Aero Precision operates an aerospace parts manufacturing facility in the former BMI-Textron building. The company makes turbine engine parts for industrial gas turbines and flight turbines. Other businesses on site include a furniture manufacturer, electrical, masonry and cabinetry contractors, a cleaning company, and a flooring company.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 8 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 71 people and generated an estimated $8,629,941 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Brown's Dump Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Brown’s Dump Superfund site occupies about 250 acres in Jacksonville, Florida. The City of Jacksonville used the area as a landfill for incinerator ash from the 1940s until 1953. When the landfill closed, the Duval County School Board acquired the site property. The school board built an elementary school over the former landfill. The site also includes a Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) electrical substation and residences. Sampling of area soil found lead and other contaminants from incinerator ash in the landfill. A site inspection by EPA in 1998 determined that cleanup actions would be required. EPA did not list the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) but considers it an NPL-caliber site and is addressing it through the Superfund Alternative Approach. The City of Jacksonville agreed to conduct cleanup activities. The cleanup plan, developed in 2006, required removal of contaminated soils and replacement with clean soil. In total, cleanup addressed a former school property and about 216 residential properties, allowing residents to continue living safely in their homes. Single-family homes and multi-unit apartments currently occupy areas around the original landfill. JEA also continues to operate an electrical substation on 2 acres of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cabot/Koppers Capped Site Reuse

Big Lots retail store at the mall on the siteCabot/KoppersThe 140-acre Cabot-Koppers Superfund site is located in Gainesville, Florida. Beazer East and the Cabot Carbon Corporation are the responsible parties for the cleanup of the two site properties. The Koppers property includes 90 acres on the western part of the site. The Cabot property covers 50 acres on the eastern part of the site. The Koppers property includes the area where a wood treatment facility operated between 1916 and 2009. The Cabot property includes areas where tar, turpentine and charcoal were made from 1908 to 1967. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) because of soil and groundwater contamination. Cleanup included pumping and treating contaminated groundwater; this remedy has been in operation for over 20 years. EPA updated the remedy in 2011, requiring additional cleanup of soils and groundwater by Beazer East and the Cabot Carbon Corporation. This cleanup effort is ongoing and should be completed within four years. A shopping mall, car dealership and several other businesses currently operate on portions of the Cabot property. The Koppers property is not in use. Commercial redevelopment is planned for the Koppers property after cleanup.
Last updated September 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 17 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 201 people and generated an estimated $52,485,220 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Cascade Park Gasification Plant Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Central view of Cascades Park, with Meridian Plaza and fountains on the left and the amphitheater on the rightCascade Park Gasification PlantThe 10-acre Cascade Park Gasification Plant and Landfill site is located in Tallahassee, Florida. From 1895 until the mid-1950s, the City of Tallahassee operated a manufactured gas plant (MGP) on site. The plant turned coal into gas to provide light and heat for city residents. A city-owned landfill opened on site in the 1920s and accepted waste from the MGP. In 1987, the State of Florida and EPA determined that site activities and waste management practices had contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater. The City worked with EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to clean up the site. Cleanup activities included removing 98,000 tons of contaminated soil, capping residual contamination, restoring a creek and sampling groundwater. EPA, the State and the City of Tallahassee are working together to address remaining groundwater contamination. Local stakeholders developed a community-wide redevelopment plan that manages stormwater, creates a public park, preserves local natural resources and celebrates the site’s history. In 2008, EPA Region 4 recognized the community’s planning efforts with its Excellence in Site Reuse award. In April 2010, the City and Blueprint 2000, a local intergovernmental agency, began construction of the 24-acre Cascades Park, which includes the former MGP property. Cascades Park officially opened in March 2014. Over 1,000 people attended the opening ceremony. Park features include 2.3 miles of trails, playgrounds, a waterfall, interactive fountains, a war memorial, and an amphitheater for concerts and community events.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Chemform, Inc.

Sign for the Sol Group, which currently operates at the former Chemform, Inc. Superfund siteChemform, Inc.The 4-acre Chemform, Inc. Superfund site is located in Pompano Beach, Florida. Between 1967 and 1985, the facility made metal parts for the aerospace industry and electrochemical machines for other industries. Facility operations included discharge of process wastewater into an open trench and a septic system and associated leach field near the manufacturing building. A 1985 assessment found that facility activities and waste disposal practices had contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included removing and properly disposing of contaminated soil, containerized wastes, debris and tank contents. Contractors also installed a groundwater monitoring system. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2000. In 2010, a company opened a wholesale produce distribution center at the site. Recent groundwater sampling data indicates that arsenic and vinyl chloride remain in a few wells at concentrations that exceed EPA and Florida Department of Environmental Protection drinking water standards. Additional investigations are underway to determine the extent of groundwater contamination. Property use restrictions and the availability of municipal water supplies protect people from drinking contaminated groundwater at the site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 5 people and generated an estimated $361,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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City Industries, Inc.

The 1-acre City Industries, Inc. Superfund site is located in Orlando, Florida. From the early 1970s until 1983, a hazardous waste management facility operated on site. Improper disposal practices led to soil and groundwater contamination. In 1983, after a state order to cease operations, City Chemical Company abandoned the site. The company left behind barrels of hazardous waste and thousands of gallons of sludge in large on-site holding tanks. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, EPA and responsible parties led cleanup activities at the site between 1983 and 1994. Cleanup included the removal of drums and sludge, treatment of contaminated soil, and installation of a groundwater pumping and treatment system. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Since 1983, several small commercial and retail businesses have operated on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 5 people and generated an estimated $589,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Coleman-Evans Wood Preserving Co.

The 10-acre Coleman Evans Wood Preserving Co. Superfund site is located in Jacksonville, Florida. The Coleman Evans Wood Preserving Company operated a wood-treating and processing facility at the site from 1954 until the mid-1980s. Wastewater disposal practices contaminated soil and sediment. Site operations also contaminated groundwater beneath the site and under a nearby neighborhood. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Between 1986 and 1994, EPA conducted several emergency cleanup activities to address immediate threats at the site. These activities included the removal and disposal of two on-site disposal pits and the removal of contaminated structures. Cleanup also included the removal and disposal of contaminated soil and sediment from the nearby residential area and the installation of fencing and signs. Further EPA cleanup activities included the treatment of contaminated soil and the installation of a wastewater treatment plant. EPA completed the cleanup in 2007 and took the site off the NPL in 2014. In July 2000, the City of Jacksonville received a grant through EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative pilot program to fund a reuse planning process for the site. Community reuse plans for the site include a new park and recreation facility, a community center, a skateboard park, basketball courts, tennis courts and handball courts. The Coleman-Evans Park Master Plan calls for the development of the park in three phases. This phased approach allows the City to identify the financial resources for each stage and make any changes to the plan as needed. Although EPA has determined that the site is ready for anticipated use, no reuse activities have taken place at the site to date.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Davie Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Davie LandfillDavie LandfillThe Davie Landfill Superfund site is located in Broward County, Florida. A landfill operated on site from 1964 to 1987. The landfill accepted construction debris, tires and municipal wastes. In addition, a basin at the site received grease trap material, septic tank sludge and treated municipal sludge. Waste disposal activities led to the contamination of site soils, sediments and groundwater. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. With EPA oversight, Broward County contained the cyanide and sulfide-contaminated basin sediments, stabilizing the material in a disposal cell and capping the cell with a protective covering. Natural processes that break down contaminants are addressing the contamination in site groundwater. In 2006, EPA took the site off the NPL. The site’s remedy allows for a variety of recreational uses. About 160 acres of the 210-acre site are now part of Vista View Park, which opened in 2003. Park facilities include trails, picnic shelters, playgrounds, basketball courts, an equestrian corral, an airstrip for electric radio-controlled planes and glider pilots, fishing docks, and an area for camping. In 2010, EPA Region 4 recognized Broward County’s leadership with its Excellence in Site Reuse award.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 17 people and generated an estimated $337,582 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Escambia Wood - Pensacola

Escambia Wood - PensacolaEscambia Wood - PensacolaThe Escambia Wood Treating Company – Pensacola Superfund site is located in Pensacola, Florida. From 1942 to 1982, the Escambia Wood Treating facility operated a wood-preserving plant at the site. Facility operations and waste management practices contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1991, the company filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the facility. In 1994, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA has led multiple cleanup actions at the site. Activities included permanently relocating hundreds of residents affected by contamination and placing land and groundwater use restrictions on the site. Cleanup also included excavation and capping of contaminated soil as well as groundwater treatment. In 2000, Escambia County developed a master redevelopment plan for the site. The plan identified the area as a prime location for a business park. The design and implementation of the site’s final cleanup plan, selected in 2006, took into account the future use plans. In 2007, EPA, state and local agencies, and community leaders gathered at the site to kick off the soil cleanup. Today, about 100 acres of cleaned-up land are ready for commercial and industrial use. EPA and the State are working with local government to support the redevelopment of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Florida Petroleum Reprocessors

Vehicle and equipment storage at the siteFlorida Petroleum ReprocessorsThe Florida Petroleum Reprocessors (FPR) Superfund site is located in Davie, Florida. The site consists of the 1-acre facility property and a groundwater plume that covered about 870 acres. From 1979 to 1992, several companies operated at the FPR facility. Some recycled used motor oil and fuel. In 1996, EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection identified contamination at a nearby municipal well field. The agencies traced the contamination back to the FPR facility. In response, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2001, cleanup removed contaminated source materials. In 2004, EPA decided to postpone long-term groundwater treatment to gather additional data. Natural processes that break down contaminants address the contaminated groundwater plume. While cleanup was underway, a vehicle and equipment storage facility operated on the southern portion of the site. Several highway billboards are also located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Florida Steel Corp. Core Infrastructure Reuse

Florida Steel Corp.Florida Steel Corp.The Florida Steel Corporation Superfund site occupies 152 acres northwest of Indiantown, Florida. From 1970 to 1982, site operations included recycling of cars and scrap metal to produce steel reinforcement bars for concrete. EPA discovered contaminated emissions control dust and soil on site. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1982. Cleanup actions in 1994 included removing contaminated soil and capping emissions control dust on site. Cleanup also included groundwater treatment and wetland sediment removal. Remedy construction is complete. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. The Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company secured an option to purchase the site property in 2010. The company plans to build a natural gas storage facility on site to provide a secure site for state energy reserves.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Former Spellman Engineering Athletic Fields Reuse

Lake Highland Preparatory School softball fields at the Former Spellman Engineering Superfund site,Former Spellman EngineeringThe Former Spellman Engineering site is located near downtown Orlando, Florida. Spellman Engineering, a former parts cleaning facility, operated at the site from 1963 to 1969. In 1992, EPA detected a groundwater contaminant plume extending beyond the property boundaries. The plume contained chemicals associated with the parts cleaning operations. The City of Orlando and Orlando Utility Commission (OUC) acquired much of the property prior to the discovery of the plume. Under a lease agreement with an option to purchase, Lake Highland Preparatory School (LHPS) developed some of the land into a sports and recreation complex. The property’s value presented the City and OUC with the opportunity to use proceeds from its sale to help fund the site’s cleanup. This prevented the site’s listing on the National Priorities List (NPL). Burial of the site’s groundwater cleanup system allowed for remediation while optimizing reuse opportunities. The project provided benefits for all parties involved. For the City and OUC, the site’s cleanup protects public health, while the adjacent property’s redevelopment will provide new land uses to address community needs. For surrounding neighborhoods, the cleanup addresses local health and safety concerns, removes a community "eyesore," and results in the Lake Highland property’s redevelopment in a manner consistent with community goals and priorities. For LHPS, the site’s cleanup provides an adjacent land area for new and expanded school facilities. Today, the school’s O’Meara Family Sports Center includes a new ballfield, practice fields and parking, with future expansion plans calling for a gymnasium and maintenance facilities. The Dinky Line segment of the Orlando Urban Trail, a paved recreation trail, now extends through the area. The City and OUC are also exploring opportunities for mixed-use redevelopment near Central Florida’s new SunRail commuter rail line and other planned public transit facilities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Harris Corp. (Palm Bay Plant)

A Florida Institute of Technology building on the Harris Corp (Palm Bay Plant) Superfund siteHarris Corp. (Palm Bay Plant)The 310-acre Harris Corp. (Palm Bay Plant) Superfund site is located in Palm Bay, Florida. The site was home to an electronics firm from the 1950s until Harris Corporation purchased the firm in 1967. Intersil Corporation bought the operations from Harris Corporation. Both companies currently continue to make equipment on site. In the early 1980s, EPA discovered groundwater contamination under the facility and in a nearby well field. As a result, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) removed and treated contaminated groundwater. In 2002, groundwater treatment ended. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In 2010, Intersil Corporation donated a $13 million state-of-the-art fabrication facility and a 5-acre property to the University of Central Florida as a research center. The University kept the option to accept the donated facility until the summer of 2013, but decided against using the buildings. Intersil Corporation worked with EPA and the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) to finalize FIT’s purchase of the facility and land. FIT plans to use the area as an extended campus for students. Intersil Corporation also leases portions of its property to other companies. In February 2015, Harris Corporation opened a new 464,000 square-foot, $130 million technology center. The Center houses more than 1,400 engineers and staff. The Center’s construction created nearly 300 jobs for workers in the area. In the summer of 2016, a land parcel was purchased from Intersil Corporation for development of a convenient store and gas station.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 27 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 5,224 people and generated an estimated $1,905,376,235 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Helena Chemical Co. (Tampa Plant)

Helena Chemical Company office building at the SiteHelena Chemical Co. (Tampa Plant)The 8-acre Helena Chemical Co. (Tampa Plant) Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. Originally owned by the Flag Sulfur Company, the facility made chemical agricultural products from 1929 to 1967. Helena Chemical Company purchased the company and continued to process and handle chemical agricultural products. EPA investigated the site from 1988 to 1990. Studies found contamination in the soil and groundwater. In 1992, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup involved removing chemical storage tanks and treating soils. Groundwater also needed to be cleaned up to meet drinking water levels. Cleanup began in 2000 and is ongoing. The Helena Chemical Company remains on site. The company uses the facility as a distribution center.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $32,066,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hollingsworth Solderless Terminal

View of the building in continued commercial use at the Hollingsworth Solderless Terminal siteHollingsworth Solderless TerminalThe 3.5-acre Hollingsworth Solderless Terminal Superfund site is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. From 1968 to 1982, Hollingsworth Solderless Terminal Company conducted electrical manufacturing activities on site. The company disposed of wastewater in on-site fields. In 1980, the Broward County Environmental Quality Control Board found that site activities had contaminated groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities in 1986 included abandoning old drain fields, treating soil and groundwater, and injecting treated groundwater back into the ground. In 2002, EPA removed and properly disposed of additional contaminated soil. EPA later changed the remedy and began using bioremediation to address remaining contamination. Today, groundwater contaminant levels are low and groundwater monitoring is ongoing. EPA designed the cleanup to be compatible with the continued operation of on-site businesses. Small businesses currently operating on site include a uniform distribution center, a law firm, a car dealership, a custom woodworking company and a moving company.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 13 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 59 people and generated an estimated $14,989,520 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Jacksonville Ash Site Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Emmet Reed Community CenterJacksonville Ash SiteThe Jacksonville Ash Site Superfund site is located in Jacksonville, Florida. The site includes three areas where the City of Jacksonville's municipal incinerators created and deposited ash. The Forest Street Incinerator covers about 370 acres. The 5th & Cleveland Incinerator covers about 520 acres. Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park covers about 250 acres. These areas are located in residential areas. The Forest Street Incinerator and the 5th & Cleveland Incinerator were the City of Jacksonville’s municipal solid waste incinerators from the 1910s until the 1960s. Operators disposed of combustion ash, clinker and ash residues on each of the incinerator properties, as well as on the land later redeveloped into Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park. EPA did not list the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) but considers it an NPL-caliber site and is addressing the site through the Superfund Alternative Approach. Cleanup efforts have included soil removal, surface covers and use restrictions to prevent contact with contaminated soils. Current land uses on site include residential, commercial, recreational and public service uses. All three sections of the site remained in use during cleanup. Facilities at Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park include playgrounds, picnic pavilions, restrooms, a sand volleyball court, walking paths and parking areas. The 5th Street and Cleveland Incinerator area is now home to the Emmet C. Reed Community Center, a pool and recreational facilities, including a basketball court, playground, the MaliVai Washington Tennis Center and parking. The Forest Street Incinerator area includes a park building, a ball field, parking, playground areas and an animal care facility. EPA Region 4 recognized the community’s leadership with its Excellence in Site Reuse award in December 2015. Future plans include additional park facilities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 46 people and generated an estimated $1,423,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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JJ Seifert Machine

The 2-acre JJ Seifert Machine Superfund site is located in Ruskin, Florida. From 1962 to 2011, JJ Seifert Machine Company made electronic components on site. Facility operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. After EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) investigated site conditions, FDEP installed filters on private wells where contaminants exceeded drinking water standards in 2009. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2010. In 2014 and 2015, EPA excavated and disposed of 615 tons of contaminated soil. EPA also installed monitoring wells and injection wells for groundwater cleanup. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing. Today, a cabinet shop is active on site. It operates out of the former machine shop facility.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 5 people and generated an estimated $1,544,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Landia Chemical Company

Landia Chemical CompanyLandia Chemical CompanyThe 13-acre Landia Chemical Company Superfund site is located in Lakeland, Florida. The site spans two property parcels – the former Landia Chemical Company (LCC) property and the former Florida Favorite Fertilizer (FFF) Company. FFF began fertilizer blending operations around 1935. Between 1945 and 1987, three companies conducted industrial pesticide operations on the former LCC property. Over time, facility waste management and disposal activities released contaminants into the environment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. With oversight provided by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the responsible parties cleaned up the site. Cleanup included removal and disposal of contaminated soil as well as land and groundwater use restrictions. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Responsible parties replanted vegetation at the site. Over 30 varieties of plants and trees now grow on site. These areas are in ecological reuse. They provide habitat for native wildlife, migratory birds and pollinators. The trees also help clean up groundwater through uptake and phytoremediation. The FFF facility is currently owned by Sylvite Southeast, a wholesale fertilizer merchant. The company continues to operate a fertilizer-blending facility on site. In 2013, EPA Region 4 celebrated the City of Lakeland with its Excellence in Site Reuse Award, in recognition of ecological revitalization efforts at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 29 people and generated an estimated $15,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Madison County Sanitary Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Madison County Recycling CenterMadison County Sanitary LandfillThe 90-acre Madison County Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located outside of Madison, Florida. From 1970 to 1980, the landfill accepted wastes, including industrial chemical cleaning products from the ITT Corporation. Sampling results in the mid-1980s found contamination in the groundwater. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) immediately installed water purification systems for residents living near the landfill. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1988. The City of Madison, Madison County and the ITT Corporation agreed to pay for and conduct the cleanup. Cleanup included installation of a soil cover and a water treatment system as well as land use restrictions and groundwater monitoring. Madison County currently uses the site for various municipal purposes. A recycling facility, storage for the Madison County Department of Transportation, an aircraft hangar and a landing strip are located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 31 people. For additional information click here.

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Miami Drum Services Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 1.2-acre Miami Drum Services Superfund site is located in Miami, Florida. It includes the area where the Miami Drum Services company cleaned and recycled drums from 1966 to 1981. Once Miami Drum Services ceased operations, Dade County acquired the property for use as a maintenance facility and repair yard for its public rail lines. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 due to contaminated soil and groundwater resulting from drum cleaning and recycling operations. Dade County teamed with EPA on a strategy to remove 15,000 tons of contaminated soil and treat over 650,000 gallons of contaminated groundwater. The successful cleanup enabled Dade County to finish construction of the William Lehman Operations and Maintenance Center, the County’s 82-acre train repair facility. Today, the facility ensures the safety, quality and timeliness of Dade County's commuter trains, which serve 50,000 people each day.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Munisport Landfill

The two residential towers and parking at the siteMunisport LandfillThe Munisport Landfill Superfund site is located in North Miami, Florida. A wetland mangrove preserve connected to Biscayne Bay borders the site. The 170-acre former landfill is part of a larger parcel of land originally planned for use as part of a trade and cultural center. The center’s developers received solid waste in the 1970s for use as fill material during construction. The developers disposed of 6 million cubic yards of solid waste in an unlined landfill. These disposal practices contaminated area groundwater and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Site investigations in the late 1980s showed that the landfill no longer threatened human health. However, additional cleanup was necessary in the mangrove wetlands. Workers installed a barrier to collect and treat groundwater and to prevent contaminants from spreading. Additional tidal wetland restoration activities followed. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1999. Beginning in 2002, developers worked toward creating a billion-dollar master-planned community on site known as Biscayne Landing. Construction on the mixed-use development stalled in 2007 due to an economic downturn; plans for the area include homes and a shopping mall. Today, completed development includes two 25-story towers of luxury condominiums. Several commercial businesses also operate on site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 35 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 66 people and generated an estimated $3,444,310 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Normandy Park Apartments

Shaded playground area on the Site with pool and leasing office buildings in the backgroundNormandy Park ApartmentsThe 9-acre Normandy Park Apartments Superfund site is located in Temple Terrace, Florida, near Tampa. From 1953 to 1963, Gulf Coast Recycling operated a battery recycling and secondary lead smelting facility on site. Facility operations resulted in the release of sulfuric acid and lead into the environment. The company built a 144-unit apartment complex on the property in 1970. EPA sampling in the early 1990s confirmed widespread lead contamination. EPA proposed placing the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995, but the listing was never finalized. In 2000, EPA’s cleanup included removal of the top 2 feet of exposed soil around the apartment complex and placement of clean soil and sod in all excavated areas. It also included soil treatment and monitoring of the natural breakdown of groundwater contaminants. Restrictions are in place to limit the future use of soil and groundwater. Envirofocus acquired Gulf Coast Recycling and is now responsible for operation and maintenance activities at the site. EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection provide oversight. The apartment complex, The Park at Monument Terrace, includes a playground, an apartment clubhouse and a laundry facility. The northern courtyard consists of 80 residential units in eight buildings. The southern courtyard consists of 64 residential units in four buildings.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 2 people and generated an estimated $66,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Northwest 58th Street Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Signs for Dept. of Solid Waste Management offices at the siteNorthwest 58th Street LandfillThe 660-acre Northwest 58th Street Landfill Superfund site is located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. From 1952 to 1982, Miami-Dade County operated a municipal landfill at the site. The landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. Improper storage and burning of waste on site resulted in the contamination of groundwater. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included the connection of private well users affected by the landfill to the public water system and proper closure of the landfill. Restrictions in place at the site include stormwater management, capping of the landfill, passive methane and leachate control, and groundwater and methane gas monitoring. Miami-Dade County, the site’s potentially responsible party, led investigation and cleanup activities, with oversight provided by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. Although the site's landfill area is fenced and closed to the public, Miami-Dade County allows school groups, birdwatchers and other visitors on site with advanced notice to view the wetland area and associated wildlife. Visitors can walk along a crushed-stone trail that extends along the southern shore of the stormwater management and restored wetland area. The site is also a staging area for management of hurricane debris. The southern portion of the site has been developed for a variety of municipal uses. Dade County’s Mosquito Control Division, Solid Waste Management, Transit and Public Works, Internal Services, Fire and Public Safety Training Facilities, and South Florida Water Management District offices are located on site. Miami-Dade County is currently looking at potential reuse options for another part of the site. The County's Park and Recreation Department is interested in developing a 15-field soccer complex on the southwest corner of the landfill.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 977 people and generated an estimated $39,700,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Parramore Surplus

Parramore SurplusParramore SurplusThe 25-acre Parramore Surplus Company Superfund site is located in Mount Pleasant, Florida. A storage and resale company for surplus U.S. Navy and Air Force equipment is active on site. In the early 1970s, Parramore Surplus began purchasing products from naval and air force bases. These products included paint residues, waste oil, alcohols and degreasers. In 1982, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation inspected the site and found hundreds of drums, some of which had leaked, killing vegetation. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and developed a plan to clean up the site. The potentially responsible party financed the cleanup, which included removing drums and contaminated soil as well as treating and monitoring the groundwater. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1989. The design of EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the surplus company to remain open for business, retaining jobs and income in the community as well as maintaining a safe working environment.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $75,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Pepper Steel & Alloys, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

Pepper Steel & Alloys, Inc.Pepper Steel & Alloys, Inc.The 25-acre Pepper Steel and Alloys, Inc. Superfund site is located near Medley, Florida, northwest of Miami. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, several industrial businesses operated at the site. These businesses included manufacturers, equipment repair shops and a recycler. The firms disposed of trash and waste products, including rusted machinery and vehicles, tanks and batteries, on site. The last business closed by the mid-1980s, leaving the vacant site as an attractive area for illegal dumping. The improper disposal practices contaminated site soil and groundwater. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). With EPA and Florida Department of Environmental Protection oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties led site investigations and cleanup. Cleanup activities included removal and disposal of waste and debris as well as collection, treatment and capped storage of contaminated soils. The capped area containing the treated soil covers 11 acres. In 2005, a trucking company purchased the 5-acre southern parcel of the site for use as a commercial truck storage area. A heavy machinery parts company uses the eastern part of the middle parcel. It leases the western part of the middle parcel for commercial truck storage. A small business owner purchased the 10-acre northern parcel in 2016 for development of a custom boat manufacturing and sales location.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, economic data were not publicly available for this site. For additional information click here.

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Petroleum Products Corp.

View of warehouses and storage units occupied by various light industrial businesses at the Petroleum Products Corp. sitePetroleum Products Corp.The Petroleum Products Corp. Superfund site occupies 5 acres in Pembroke Park, Florida. Petroleum Products Corporation operated a used oil refining facility at the site from 1957 to 1971. Improper waste handling practices and oil spills resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities focused on waste oil recovery. EPA is conducting investigations to address remaining soil and groundwater contamination. The site is located in a commercial and industrial area. Pembroke Park Warehouses, a 400-unit storage facility, remains in continued use at the site. The facility includes storage units, commercial businesses, including a gun range, and light industrial businesses, including a construction company.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 44 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 157 people and generated an estimated $36,926,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Piper Aircraft Corp./Vero Beach Water & Sewer Department

The 80-acre Piper Aircraft Corp./Vero Beach Water & Sewer Department Superfund site is located in Vero Beach, Florida. An active manufacturing facility for small commuter and business planes is located on site. The facility began making airplanes in 1975. Soil and groundwater contamination resulted from a leaking underground storage tank that stored chemicals used in the company’s manufacturing process. To address the contamination, Piper Aircraft installed a groundwater pump-and-treat system in 1981. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. With EPA and Florida Department of Environmental Protection oversight, Piper Aircraft, the site’s potentially responsible party, leads site cleanup activities. A new groundwater extraction and treatment system began operating in 1998. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Piper Aircraft continues to operate its facility on site. Several airport support businesses are also located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 923 people and generated an estimated $244,112,333 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Raleigh Street Dump Pollinator Habitat Reuse

A roseate spoonbill on the siteRaleigh Street DumpThe 10-acre Raleigh Street Dump Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. Various parties dumped wastes such as battery casings, furnace slag, as well as trash and construction debris on site from 1977 to 1991. In 1988, the Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission received complaints that Tampa Fiberglass improperly disposed of waste at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. Cleanup activities included the removal and disposal of contaminated soils, addition of clean soils, planting of grass seed, wetlands restoration, groundwater monitoring and limits on future site uses. Fiberglass production is ongoing on the southern portion of the site. Potentially responsible parties (PRPs) expanded the previously existing wetlands habitat, creating a wildflower and native grass meadow on the upland area. PRPs installed nesting boxes for small birds and created habitat brush piles. PRPs also installed a bat box to provide habitat to native Florida bats and planted two milkweed gardens to provide habitat for Monarch butterflies. At the 2015 Wildlife Habitat Council’s annual conservation conference, a PRP contractor accepted the “Rookie of the Year” award for ecological restoration efforts at the site on behalf of the PRPs. EPA also recognized the PRPs with its 2016 Excellence in Reuse award.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 3 people and generated an estimated $479,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Reeves Southeastern Galvanizing Corp.

The steel part loading area and warehouse on the siteReeves Southeastern Galvanizing Corp.The Reeves Southeastern Galvanizing Corp. Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. The site includes the 17-acre Reeves Southeastern Galvanizing facility and the 11-acre Reeves Southeastern Wire facility. Beginning in the 1960s, the Reeves facilities disposed of wastes in ponds on site. This resulted in contamination of soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removal, treatment and disposal of soil and sediment, and a well survey. In 2014, EPA revised the groundwater remedy from monitored natural attenuation to in-place, chemically-induced precipitation. Monitoring of groundwater and area water bodies is ongoing. Most of the site has remained in continued use during cleanup. In March 1996, Industrial Galvanizers of America (IGA) leased a 10-acre portion of the property. Since that time, IGA has continued to operate a galvanizing facility on site. In April 2001, Master-Halco purchased Reeves Southeastern Corporation's Southeastern Wire Division. The company has continued to operate a wire-fencing manufacturing facility on the Reeves Southeastern Wire property. Electronic Entry Distributers also operates on the site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 154 people and generated an estimated $55,206,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Sanford Gasification Plant Green Remediation Reuse

The Sanford Gasification Superfund Alternative Site spans 26 parcels in Sanford, Florida. The Site includes the former Sanford Manufactured Gas Plant (SMGP) facility, an unnamed tributary, and Cloud Branch Creek from the unnamed tributary to where the creek discharges into Lake Monroe. Water gas and carbureted water gas manufacturing took place at the SMGP facility from the 1880s to 1951. Operations generated tar and condensate waste, which SMGP stored on site. These operations resulted in contamination of soils, groundwater, and sediment. EPA evaluated the site in 1997 but did not list it on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA considers it an NPL-caliber site and is addressing it through EPA’s Superfund Alternative Approach. The remedy currently protects human health and the environment. Contaminated sediments were removed. Contaminated surface soils were removed and replaced with clean fill or cover material now prevents exposure to contaminated soil. A groundwater use advisory zone is in effect for the area affected by groundwater contamination. For the remedy to be protective over the long term, restrictions are needed to limit access to contaminated groundwater and activities that could affect the protectiveness of the remedy. Recovery House recently acquired two site parcels for use as part of an addiction rehabilitation/reintegration program. The organization is renovating the site building to meet updated code requirements.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Schuylkill Metals Corp.

10-acres of restored wetlands that provide new wildlife habitat on the former Schuykill Metals Corp. siteSchuylkill Metals Corp.The 17.4-acre Schuylkill Metals Corp. Superfund site is located in Plant City, Florida. A battery recycling facility operated on site from 1972 to 1986. Improper waste management resulted in contamination of site soil, sediment, surface and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In June 1986, the facility closed. EPA’s 1990 cleanup plan included addressing contaminated soil, groundwater and on-site marshes. Cleanup activities included burying contaminated soils and sediment, then covering them with clean soil and plants. Today, cleanup activities are complete. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001. The potentially responsible parties removed contamination from the site’s wetlands and replanted areas with native vegetation. The successful cleanup and restoration of the site created 11 acres of new wildlife habitat. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection oversees protection of the new wetlands.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Sherwood Medical Industries

Covidien Corporation continues to operate at the SiteSherwood Medical IndustriesThe 43-acre Sherwood Medical Industries Superfund site is located in DeLand, Florida. Sherwood Medical Industries manufactured medical supplies on site beginning in 1959. The company disposed of liquid and sludge wastes into tanks and ponds, contaminating soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Ongoing cleanup activities include collection, treatment and monitoring of groundwater as well as surface water and sediment sampling. The site owner also tests residential wells and enforces land use restrictions. Access to Miller Lake, which is partially located on the site property, is also restricted. The cleanup plan has allowed for the continued use of the site throughout the cleanup process. Covidien Corporation currently manufactures medical supplies at the site and employs about 550 people.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 900 people and generated an estimated $1,044,367,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Solitron Devices Inc.

Solitron Devices Inc.Solitron Devices Inc.The 8-acre Solitron Devices, Inc. Superfund site is located in Riviera Beach, Florida. In 1959, Honeywell built a facility at the site and began making electronic components for the defense and space industries. In 1965, Solitron Devices assumed ownership of the property. The company continued similar operations and expanded the facility. Honeywell and Solitron Devices both used heavy metals and organic solvents during facility operations. The facility’s industrial wastewater discharged to the city of Riviera Beach’s sewer system. In 1985, a state study found that solvents from the site had contaminated municipal supply wells in the city’s public well field. The study found groundwater contamination and a small area of metals-contaminated soil. In 2004, EPA issued a cleanup plan for the site. It included soil excavation and disposal and groundwater pumping and treatment. The cleanup plan also included the injection of treated water into the ground with added oxygen to enhance the natural breakdown of contaminants. The site’s remaining facilities – a warehouse, parking lot and paved entrance road – lay idle after former site owner Solitron Devices filed for bankruptcy in 1992. In 1999, EPA entered into a prospective purchaser agreement with the National Land Company (NLC) for the northern, 4-acre part of the site property. NLC purchased the area in 2000. NLC renovated it for commercial and light industrial land uses, including warehousing, light manufacturing and storage. In 2008, All Air Conditioned Self Storage purchased the area. It currently operates a self-storage facility on site. FedEx leases the building on the southern part of the site.
Last updated November 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 61 people and generated an estimated $24,890,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Solitron Microwave

Sign at the entrance for Port Salerno Industrial ParkSolitron MicrowaveThe 20-acre Solitron Microwave Superfund site is located in Port Salerno, Florida. Metal plating and microwave manufacturing businesses operated on site from 1963 to 1987. Manufacturers made materials for the military, aerospace and microwave industries. Operations and leaking pipes and drum pads contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. The site’s cleanup included soil removal, groundwater treatment and extension of the public water supply to affected residents. Cleanup activities started in 2000 and finished in 2004. Monitoring of the natural breakdown of contaminants in groundwater is ongoing. EPA provided safety and liability information to local officials and prospective purchasers to promote reuse. Portions of the site are reserved for wetlands and a native plant habitat reserve. Port Salerno Industrial Park (PSIP) purchased the site property in 2003 and coordinated with EPA during construction of an industrial park for warehouse, office space and commercial facilities. The industrial park consists of seven lots with a paved roadway. A web printing services business began operating on site in 2006. A land development company purchased a lot in 2010 and built a warehouse for its operations. The company also purchased an additional lot in 2013 with plans to expand parking and other facilities. EPA Region 4 presented PSIP with its Excellence in Site Reuse award in recognition of its leadership and redevelopment efforts.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 45 people and generated an estimated $8,200,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Southern Solvents, Inc.

AAA Diversified Services storage buildingSouthern Solvents, Inc.The 1-acre Southern Solvents, Inc. Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. A dry-cleaning solvents facility operated on site from the late 1970s to 1989. Spills from storage tanks on site contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in July 2000. Cleanup included soil and groundwater treatment. Groundwater use restrictions are in place. A commercial painting business has operated on site since 1998. EPA worked with the company to make sure cleanup activities did not impact its operations. They also worked together to address potential liability concerns. In 2004, EPA entered into a prospective purchaser agreement with the painting company. The company then purchased the site property.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $1,400,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Standard Auto Bumper Corp. Capped Site Reuse

View of northern end of site, which is owned by Z Roofing. Area is in reuse as a storage area for work vehicles and roofing tilesStandard Auto Bumper Corp.The 7-acre Standard Auto Bumper Corp. Superfund site is located in Hialeah, Florida. Standard Auto Bumper Corporation operated a plating facility on site from 1959 to 1992. Operators initially discharged wastewater into a ditch behind the facility, then treated wastewater and discharged it to a percolation pit. These waste disposal practices led to soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1992, EPA selected a cleanup plan that included the removal and disposal of contaminated soil, groundwater monitoring and groundwater use controls. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2007. Today, businesses on site provide truck parking, concrete fencing and roofing services. A bakery and two furniture companies are located on an area that became part of the site after EPA expanded its original boundary.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 135 people and generated an estimated $21,916,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Stauffer Chemical Co. (Tampa) Capped Site Reuse

The 40-acre Stauffer Chemical Company (Tampa) Superfund site is located in an industrial area of Tampa, Florida. From 1951 to 1986, the Stauffer Chemical Company used the site for production, packaging and distribution of agricultural chemical products, primarily pesticides. During facility operations, workers disposed of waste materials and chemicals by burning or burying them on site. These improper waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of site soil, sediments, surface water and area groundwater with pesticides. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Prior to listing on the NPL, EPA and Stauffer Management Company (SMC), the oversight body for the Stauffer Chemical Company, agreed to conduct initial cleanup to contain contaminants. Early cleanup efforts included removal of buried drums, contaminated soil and debris. EPA and SMC agreed to conduct additional cleanup and long-term maintenance activities that would allow for future reuse of the site. Cleanup included treatment of contaminated soil and sediment, and groundwater treatment. To ensure long-term protection, SMC secured materials with a protective cap. Currently, legal restrictions prohibit activities that could disturb the capped area. Parties cannot use groundwater at the site. Groundwater treatment continues. SMC monitors groundwater each year. In response to lost wetlands, a conservation easement now protects a 5.6-acre portion of the site as an ecological area. An additional site parcel is ready for reuse and available for redevelopment. EPA and site stakeholders will continue supporting reuse efforts at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Sydney Mine Sludge Ponds

The 9.5-acre Sydney Mine Sludge Ponds Superfund site is located in Brandon, Hillsborough County, about 15 miles east of downtown Tampa. The site is part of a 1,754-acre former phosphate mine that was strip-mined in the 1930s and 1950s. From 1958 to the mid-1960s, site owners disposed of phosphatic clay wastes and tailing sands in retention areas on site. From 1973 to 1982, companies leased the site for the permitted disposal of septic wastes, waste automobile oils, grease trap wastes and manufacturing oils. These activities resulted in the release of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) into site soil and groundwater. In the mid-1980s, Hillsborough County voluntarily excavated and treated contaminated soils for off-site disposal and began operating a groundwater pump-and-treat system. In 1989, the EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Monitored natural attenuation is addressing contaminated groundwater. The remedy is protective of human health and the environment. In 2010, the Hillsborough County Planning Commission rezoned the previously-mined site area as an Energy Industrial Park-Urban Service Area (EIP-USA). The former phosphate mine is now zoned for Planned Development and Agricultural Rural uses. The land use change and EIP-USA zoning will allow the area to be used for alternative energy production, research facilities, warehousing, industrial research and office buildings, as well as retail uses at entrances to the project area. Reclamation work at the former phosphate mine is ongoing, northwest, north and northeast of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Taylor Road Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

On-site runway, work tables, and parked vehicles along the Tampa Model Airplane Club facilitiesTaylor Road LandfillThe 42-acre Taylor Road Landfill Superfund site is located in Hillsborough County, Florida. The municipal landfill is one of three landfills owned and operated by Hillsborough County. In October 1979, EPA discovered contamination in site monitoring wells. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Hillsborough County closed all three landfills under the state landfill closure program. Closure activities included capping of waste, a vegetative cover, and gas and leachate collection. The cleanup plan included addressing groundwater contamination, connecting nearby residences to the public water supply and restricting use of drinking water wells. After cleanup, the County established a recycling center, a community collection center, a household chemical and electronics collection center, a site maintenance facility, and an environmental field office at the site. The County also uses part of the landfill to grow hay for erosion control. Hillsborough County collaborated with the Tampa Radio-Control Aircraft Club and the Academy of Model Aeronautics on a model airplane park. The park includes a paved runway and covered work areas. The County also collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the use of methane gas from the landfills as a potential renewable energy resource. In 2010, EPA Region 4 presented Hillsborough County with its Excellence in Site Reuse award, recognizing the County’s leadership and innovation in returning the site to productive and beneficial use. Active commercial uses on the southern part of the site include a truck stop, a restaurant and car sales.
Last updated October 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 12 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 257 people and generated an estimated $134,162,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Tower Chemical Co.

Water transport trucks at the site, and the utilities buildingTower Chemical Co.The 16-acre Tower Chemical Co. Superfund site is located about 5 miles east of Clermont, Florida. From 1957 to 1980, Tower Chemical Company operated a manufacturing facility on site. The facility’s waste disposal practices left contamination on site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Cleanup activities included soil removal, groundwater treatment and monitoring, and restrictions on land and groundwater use. In 2005, new owners purchased a 15-acre parcel at the site and converted the area into a storage facility for recreational vehicles, boats, trailers and other commercial vehicles. The owners cleared the remainder of the parcel for future expansion. A commercial trucking operation purchased the remaining portion of the site and used it as an unpaved parking area beginning in 2006. A RV storage company recently purchased the property and operates its facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 11 people and generated an estimated $615,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Trans Circuits, Inc.

Trans Circuits, Inc.Trans Circuits, Inc.The 1-acre Trans Circuits, Inc. Superfund site is located in an industrial park in Lake Park, Palm Beach County, Florida. From 1978 to 1988, Trans Circuits operated a manufacturing and electroplating facility for components used in electronic circuit boards. Liquid wastes in an on-site evaporation pond leaked into site soils and ground water. Following site investigations and initial cleanup actions, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 2000. Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil, treatment of contaminated groundwater, restriction of certain land and groundwater uses, and replacement of a public well. After cleanup, Florida Aero Precision, a gas turbine and aerospace parts manufacturing company located nearby, expressed interest in expansion opportunities at the site. Following extensive coordination with EPA and the State, Florida Aero Precision purchased the site property in 2011. The company began production operations in its new facility on site in 2013.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 9 people and generated an estimated $14,637,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Tri-City Oil Conservationist, Inc.

The owners of Mike's Garage purchased the property and converted the original site building into a service stationTri-City Oil Conservationist, Inc.The quarter-acre Tri-City Oil Conservationist, Inc. Superfund site is located outside of Tampa, Florida. A waste oil storage and distribution center operated on site until 1983. Careless operating conditions resulted in spills and leaks from tanks and lines. In 1982, a 3,000-gallon spill of waste oil occurred at the Tri-City operation. The Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) identified contamination in soil and sludge samples from the spill area. After the owners refused an FDER request to clean up the spill, EPA took immediate action to clean up contamination under the Superfund program. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA removed and disposed of contaminated soil and removed storage tanks. EPA then replanted the area to prevent erosion. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1988. In 1990, Mike’s Garage purchased the site property and reused the original building as an auto repair business. The garage continues to operate at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 4 people and generated an estimated $440,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Varsol Spill

The Varsol Spill Superfund site is located in Miami, Florida. It is part of Miami International Airport. The Airport is located less than a half-mile south of the Lower Miami Springs Municipal Well Field. Starting in 1966, airport industrial operations resulted in spills and leaks of hydrocarbons totaling nearly 2 million gallons. These spills included an underground pipeline leak that discharged about 1.6 million gallons of varsol, a petroleum solvent. The airport discovered the solvent in the northeast section of the airport around 1970. Investigations verified surface water and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Later that year, Dade County installed 43 monitoring wells to determine the extent and magnitude of spilled jet fuel and installed recovery wells in the Concourse E area. Through May 1984, cleanup activities recovered over 102,000 gallons of jet fuel. A study in 1985 found the area was free of petroleum solvent. Based on study findings, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1988. The area remains part of Miami International Airport.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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West Florida Natural Gas Company

Today, the 6-acre northern portion of the site currently operates as a scrap metal recycling facilityWest Florida Natural Gas CompanyThe 8-acre West Florida Natural Gas Company Superfund site is located in Ocala, Florida. A manufactured gas plant operated on site from 1895 until about 1960. Waste disposal practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. People’s Gas System, the potentially responsible party (PRP) for the site, removed and disposed of 10,000 tons of contaminated soil in 1990. EPA did not list the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) but considers it an NPL-caliber site. EPA is addressing the site through the Superfund Alternative Approach, which uses the same investigation process, cleanup process and standards used for sites listed on the NPL. Site investigations and cleanup planning are ongoing. The manufactured gas plant was located on the 2-acre southern portion of the site. It is covered by an 8-inch-thick concrete slab. Today, a scrap metal recycling facility operates on the 6-acre northern portion of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 10 people and generated an estimated $10,549,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc.

Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc.Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc.The 2-acre Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc. Superfund site is located in Pompano Beach, Florida. Wilson Concepts operated a precision parts manufacturing facility on site from 1967 to 1987. Waste handling practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. After further investigation, EPA determined that the site did not pose a risk to human health or the environment. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995 after determining that site groundwater met federal drinking water standards. Precision Metal Industries, a sheet metal manufacturer, currently operates on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 81 people and generated an estimated $23,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Woodbury Chemical Co. (Princeton Plant)

The 5-acre Woodbury Chemical Co. (Princeton Plant) Superfund site is located in Princeton, Florida. The Woodbury Chemical Company has formulated, distributed and sold fertilizers and pesticides at the site since 1975. After a 1979 chemical spill at the site, the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management found high levels of contamination in drinking water wells on and near the site. EPA sampling also identified contamination in soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. The Woodbury Chemical Company removed contaminated soil from the chemical spill area. EPA’s final cleanup plan required groundwater monitoring but did not require further action for the soil. After groundwater monitoring results showed the site did not pose a significant risk to public health, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. Woodbury Chemical Company and a farm supply store continued to operate on site during cleanup activities. A salvage yard and a vehicle maintenance/repair shop are also located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Yellow Water Road Dump

Cattle grazing on the western perimeter of the siteYellow Water Road DumpThe Yellow Water Road Superfund site is located in Baldwin, Florida. In the late 1940s, Robert Tyler purchased the property, a former dairy farm, with plans for commercial development. In 1981, the American Environmental Energy Corporation, the American Electric Corporation and the American Environmental Protection Corporation joined together to start a disposal facility at the site. During facility operations, chemicals spilled onto the ground and contaminated the soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities included treating contaminated soil, monitoring groundwater, and restricting well water use and certain land uses in the area. After cleanup finished, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1999. EPA’s carefully selected cleanup plan and cooperation and open communication among site stakeholders has enabled the continued use of part of the site for horse and cattle grazing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Zellwood Ground Water Contamination

The 57-acre Zellwood Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Zellwood, Florida, just outside of Orlando. Beginning in the 1960s, several industrial businesses operated on site, including the Drum Service Company (DSC). After emptying and cleaning steel drums, DSC left liquid waste and dirty water in unlined ponds and ditches. In the early 1980s, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) found large amounts of heavy metals in wastewater and groundwater samples. Later investigations found that several other companies operating at the site also contributed to the contamination. After the removal of contaminated drums, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included isolating heavily-contaminated soils inside a protected concrete structure and installing permanent monitoring wells. DSC, now known as Industrial Container Services, LLC of Florida, still occupies most of the site and continues to monitor groundwater quality. The site remains in active industrial use. Companies on site manufacture liquid cleaning products, machine lubricants and concrete.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 192 people and generated an estimated $27,514,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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