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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Pennsylvania

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A.I.W. Frank/Mid-County Mustang

The mulch company on the siteA.I.W. Frank/Mid-County MustangThe 16-acre A.I.W. Frank/Mid-County Mustang Superfund site is located in Exton, Pennsylvania. The site includes the 15-acre A.I.W. Frank property and the 1-acre Mid-County Mustang property. From 1962, manufacturing of Styrofoam cups and plates took place on the A.I.W. Frank property. After 20 years, manufacture of refrigerators, freezers and warming cabinets for the institutional food service industry occurred on site. Since the 1940s, auto repair facilities and body shops operated at the Mid-County Mustang property. Disposal of used solvents and degreasers on both properties resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included soil removal, demolition of a building damaged by fire, and extraction and treatment of groundwater. EPA also connected nearby residents to the public water supply. Currently, grass and concrete cover the vacant A.I.W. Frank property. An auto repair shop and a mulch company continue to operate on the Mid-County Mustang property. The Mid-County Mustang property also has a parking lot and a small lawn area. In 2015, the township rezoned both site properties to allow for residential and office use. EPA has received inquiries from several developers interested in building townhomes or condominiums on site. EPA will continue to coordinate with interested parties to facilitate redevelopment that is compatible with the site’s remedy.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $59,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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American Street Tannery

Several tanneries operated on a city block in the Northern Liberties neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania until 1986. Tannery operations contaminated the area with pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. Due to contamination, EPA designated one of the tanneries, located between George, Bodine, American and Widley Streets, as the American Street Tannery site. In 1987, EPA removed drums, laboratory chemical containers and sludge containers from the site. In 1990, after a fire, EPA cleaned up PCBs spilled at the site. After cleanup ended, a developer bought the site and began redevelopment. The site is now a residential condominium and commercial mixed-use complex. In 2006 and 2007, EPA did further testing of soil, groundwater and air to ensure the safety of the site for reuse.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 29 people and generated an estimated $1,785,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Austin Avenue Radiation Site

The Austin Avenue Radiation Superfund site is made up of 40 privately-owned properties. The properties are in Lansdowne Borough, East Lansdowne Borough, Upper Darby Township, Aldan Borough, Yeadon Borough and Darby Borough, Pennsylvania. W.L. Cummings Radium Processing Company refined radium on site from 1915 to 1925. The company mixed radioactive wastes generated on site into fill material and building materials. These materials were used at 40 properties, resulting in contamination. Because these contaminants posed significant health risks, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. EPA removed materials contaminated with radioactive waste and demolished contaminated houses. EPA also removed contaminated soil from 21 properties and rebuilt 11 houses. EPA completed cleanup activities in 1998 and returned properties to owners. Private residential uses continue at 11 properties. Residents from eight of the demolished homes chose to permanently relocate. Area municipalities acquired these eight properties for public use. A developer built new homes on three properties. EPA completed cleanup and took the site off the NPL in 2002.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Avco Lycoming (Williamsport Division)

The 28-acre Avco Lycoming (Williamsport Division) Superfund site is in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The site has housed manufacturing facilities since the early 1900s. Former operations included a bicycle and sewing machine facility, a sandpaper plant, a tool and die shop, and a silk plant. Avco Corporation began producing aircraft engines at the site in the 1920s. Site activities resulted in contamination of groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Groundwater treatment systems are operating on site and off site. Lycoming Engines continues to manufacture aircraft engines at the site. An auto body shop also operates on the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 121 people and generated an estimated $222,172,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Bally Ground Water Contamination

The 20-acre Bally Ground Water Contamination Superfund site includes the former Bally Engineered Structures (BES) plant in Bally, Pennsylvania. From 1972 to 1995, BES made insulated refrigeration panels on the site. From about 1955 to 1965, the company and its predecessors disposed of solvent wastes in on-site impoundments. Groundwater under the site supplies drinking water to residents in Bally and Washington Townships. After a water quality inspection identified groundwater contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Under EPA’s oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities. Cleanup included groundwater pumping and treatment, air stripping, and long-term site monitoring. In 2003, studies showed further groundwater contamination. The PRPs disconnected the contaminated municipal supply well. In 2010, the PRPs built a new municipal supply well and connected it to the water supply. The PRPs installed a system to prevent contaminated groundwater vapors from entering buildings at the former BES facility. Long-term indoor air monitoring is ongoing. After the BES facility closed in 1995, the buildings were subdivided for commercial reuse. Current tenants include a variety of commercial and light industrial businesses.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 54 people and generated an estimated $27,196,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Berkley Products Co. Dump Capped Site Reuse

The Berkley Products Co. Dump Superfund site occupies 5 acres in Denver, Pennsylvania. From the 1930s until 1965, a privately-owned municipal waste landfill operated at the site. Landfill operators burned or buried municipal wastes on site. In 1965, Lipton Paint and Varnish Co., a subsidiary of Berkley Products Co., bought the site. The firm buried municipal waste, organic solvents, paint wastes, resins and pigment sludge on site. When operations stopped in 1970, operators covered the site with soil, seeded the soil and sold the property. EPA found plastic production wastes in groundwater, soil and leachate. Further investigations found contamination from heavy metals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included capping the landfill and installing monitoring wells. EPA completed cleanup and took the site off the NPL in 2007. EPA continues to review the progress of the remedy every five years. In 2014, EPA discovered a compound, 1,4-dioxane, which was not detected during initial investigations. A study looking at the extent of 1,4-dioxane is currently underway. The site continues to be a private residential property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Berks Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The Berks Landfill Superfund site is located in Spring Township, Berks County, about 7 miles southwest of Reading. From the 1950s to the 1980s, a municipal landfill operated on site. The landfill included a 47-acre eastern area and a 19-acre western area. Landfilling ended in 1986. Operators closed the landfills with a soil cap. After site investigations found groundwater contamination, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties conducted cleanup at the site in 2000. Cleanup included repairing the leachate collection system, relining three leachate ponds, repairing the eastern landfill soil cover, installing a sentinel well and gas monitoring probes, planting trees and wetland vegetation, and constructing access roads. EPA completed the cleanup and took the site off the NPL in 2008. Long-term monitoring of the landfills and groundwater is ongoing. Open green space, trees and vegetation cover the landfills. The property owner uses on-site structures for storage.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Berks Sand Pit

The Berks Sand Pit Superfund site occupies 4 acres in Longswamp Township, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a contaminated groundwater plume under a residential and undeveloped wooded area. Emergency response and EPA efforts did not identify the source of contamination. Contaminants at the site included chemicals typically found in solvents and degreasers. Contamination threatened the bedrock aquifer and the Middle Branch of Perkiomen Creek. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included pumping and treating contaminated groundwater and temporarily connecting four homes to an alternate water supply. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is conducting a pilot study to determine if modifications to the remedy can clean up the remaining groundwater contamination. Monitoring of residential wells is ongoing. Residential land use continues at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Boarhead Farms

The 120-acre Boarhead Farms Superfund site is a privately-owned residential property in Bridgeton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. From 1969 to 1976, site owners improperly stored and disposed of hazardous materials in burial pits, drums and on the ground surface. These practices resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and sediment on site as well as nearby residential wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA removed the most harmful waste in the 1990s. In the early 2000s, a group of responsible parties completed additional cleanup activities, which included modifying and operating a groundwater treatment system, removing additional buried drums, and installing water treatment systems on some nearby residential wells. By 2004, workers completed the soil and source cleanup. The groundwater extraction and treatment system continues to operate. One single-family residence is located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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BoRit Asbestos

The BoRit Asbestos Superfund site is located in Ambler, Pennsylvania. The 32-acre area was formerly used for asbestos disposal. From the early 1900s until the late 1960s, the site received asbestos waste from a nearby asbestos products plant. The site includes an asbestos waste pile, a reservoir and a former park. The park closed after the discovery of asbestos contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. EPA stabilized the banks of three water bodies that run through or near the site to prevent the spread of contamination. EPA covered the asbestos waste pile and the park area with a liner, clean fill and vegetation. EPA also pumped and treated water from the reservoir into a nearby creek. EPA then reinforced the reservoir walls and covered the surface of the area with clean fill. The asbestos waste pile and former park parcels are currently vacant and unused. The former park parcel is expected to be used as a township park in the future. The reservoir parcel is now home to the Wissahickon Waterfowl Preserve, a bird sanctuary with a bird viewing area and walking trails. With EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment in mind, EPA established the Superfund Task Force in May 2017 to provide recommendations for improving and expediting site cleanups and promoting redevelopment. Based on the Superfund Task Force recommendations, EPA identified the site as a Redevelopment Opportunity site – a site with the greatest expected redevelopment potential.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Boyle Galvanizing

The Boyle Galvanizing removal site is located on a 1-acre plot in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. When the steel galvanizing factory closed, contaminated soil remained at the site. In 1995, EPA conducted a removal action and backfilled the site with clean soil. A local entrepreneur leased the property in 1997 and started an urban garden called Greensgrow Farm. As of 2019, the farm includes a plant nursery, farm stand, a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, chickens, a pig, a duck and a solar panel array. A second location offers similar services in a different part of Philadelphia. Greensgrow Farm offers cooking classes and a food safety-training program. The site and the Greensgrow Farm are a model for the development of small agricultural enterprises in low income, urban areas.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 22 people and generated an estimated $707,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Breslube-Penn, Inc.

The Breslube-Penn, Inc. Superfund site is near Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. The site includes a 7-acre source property and groundwater contamination that extends off the property. Wiseman Oil Company and later Breslube-Penn, Inc. operated a used oil processing facility at the site from 1977 until around 1986. Waste from this process was stockpiled at the facility. Improper waste disposal at the facility resulted in contamination of groundwater, surface water, soil and sediment. In 1984, Allegheny County Health Department inspectors found that sludge and oil had accumulated in diked areas around several storage tanks. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the site’s operators began some cleanup work under agreements with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources and EPA. In 1994, EPA removed about 6,400 tons of contaminated waste from the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Cleanup activities are being conducted by the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) under oversight by EPA. The PRPs excavated contaminated soil and put it in a capped waste management area on site. The PRPs are conducting a pilot study to determine whether groundwater contamination can be cleaned up in place using biological techniques. As part of the cleanup, a wetland was built on site to replace a wetland that was contaminated.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Brodhead Creek

Brodhead CreekBrodhead CreekFrom 1888 until 1944, a coal gasification plant operated at the 12-acre Brodhead Creek Superfund site in the borough of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. The plant along the west bank of Brodhead Creek produced coal tar wastes. Waste disposal practices contaminated groundwater, soil and creek sediment at the site. EPA installed an underground slurry wall to contain the coal tar wastes during early response actions. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included a coal tar recovery system. These activities removed over 2,000 gallons of coal tar before EPA determined that federal cleanup standards could not be attained at the site. Restrictions prevent the use of groundwater at the site and prohibit excavation without prior written approval. EPA and the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) completed site cleanup. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. Monitoring continues at the site to ensure the remedy remains protective. PRPs performed removal actions in 2008 and 2012 to address coal tar seeps caused by creek erosion. The creeks at the site provide habitat for fish, waterfowl and other wildlife. Anglers often visit the site to fish the creeks, which are stocked with trout. A flood control levee runs across the site; a trail on top of the levee is used by runners and walkers. The site also has an electrical substation and gas company offices.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $1,924,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Brown's Battery Breaking Capped Site Reuse

Brown's Battery BreakingBrown's Battery BreakingThe 14-acre Brown’s Battery Breaking Superfund site is in Hamburg, Pennsylvania. The facility recycled batteries from 1961 to 1971. The commonwealth of Pennsylvania found high levels of lead in children living at the site. Three families were living on site at the time. EPA found that past site operations had contaminated groundwater, surface water and soil with lead and related metals. In 1983, EPA temporarily relocated on-site residents. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1993, after further testing, EPA permanently relocated residents and an on-site business. Cleanup included removal and treatment of contaminated soil, removal of battery casings and treatment of groundwater. Commercial businesses lease the two on-site buildings for office and work space. Part of the site is a protected conservation area that provides habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife. In addition, a residential property was cleaned up and continues to be occupied.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Butler Mine Tunnel

The Butler Mine Tunnel Superfund site is in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Built in the 1930s, the Butler Mine Tunnel is a collection and discharge point for drainage from a network of underground coal mines. The tunnel discharges directly to the Susquehanna River. In 1979, an oily discharge from the tunnel created an oil slick on the river. Investigations traced the contamination back to illegal dumping of oily liquid waste and hazardous chemicals into a borehole that drained to the Butler Mine system. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup included collecting oil from the river, installing a detection system, and building access roads and anchors along the Susquehanna River. Monitoring of the tunnel is ongoing. A truck fueling and repair business continues to operate at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 3 people and generated an estimated $358,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Butz Landfill

The Butz Landfill Superfund site occupies about 13 acres in rural Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. Site owners operated an 8.5-acre municipal landfill on site from the mid- to late-1960s until 1973. In 1984, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) investigated the landfill. PADEP found that unpermitted landfill operations had contaminated groundwater with solvents and volatile organic compounds. Residents near the site used groundwater wells as a drinking water source. PADEP and EPA supplied residents with bottled water and carbon filtration systems. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Between 1992 and 1993, EPA built a water supply system for affected residents. EPA turned over ownership of the water supply system to a local authority in 1995. Groundwater impacted by the site extends over a 195-acre area. EPA installed a groundwater treatment system at the site in 2001. Between 2007 and 2014, EPA assessed groundwater vapors in homes near the site and determined that the vapors do not pose an immediate threat. During cleanup activities, crews discovered bog turtles, a protected wildlife species. After visits by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, EPA changed the design of the groundwater treatment system. EPA relocated a discharge structure and built about 3 acres of new wetlands to protect the bog turtle population. PADEP took over operation and maintenance activities at the site in 2011. In September 2015, a cow sanctuary acquired a 96-acre property located above the impacted groundwater plume. In January 2016, a landscaping and building stone business acquired about half of the 13-acre site property for aggregate storage.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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C & D Recycling

C&D RecyclingC&D RecyclingThe 45-acre C & D Recycling Superfund site is in Foster Township, Pennsylvania. For 20 years, a metal-reclamation plant operated on site. The plant incinerated lead- and plastic-cased telephone cables to reclaim the copper wire. Investigations found high concentrations of heavy metals in soil and sediment, both on site and off site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup included the removal, stabilization and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and sediment. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) demolished site infrastructure and removed wastes and cable casings. The PRPs added erosion control measures and replanted the area. The PRPs completed the cleanup in 1999. Cleanup and restoration activities restored the site to its natural state. In 2006, Green Meadows Conservancy purchased most of the site. The Conservancy plans to maintain the area as a wildlife preserve. Other parts of the site contain private residences. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2018.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Centre County Kepone Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Centre County KeponeCentre County KeponeThe 32-acre Centre County Kepone Superfund site is in State College, Pennsylvania. The former chemical manufacturing facility produced pesticides and other intermediate chemicals between 1959 and 2004. The operator disposed of wastewater and sludge in drums and lagoons on site. Investigations found that hazardous materials leaked from the lagoons. These practices caused contamination in groundwater, soil, surface water and drainage ditch sediments. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1999, under EPA oversight, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities. Cleanup included installing a groundwater extraction and treatment system, upgrading surface water management controls, and disposing of contaminated soil, sediment and waste materials. In 1998, EPA monitored the construction of a shopping center next to the site property. The construction included cleanup and redevelopment of part of the drainage ditch into a storm drainage system, a sidewalk and a vehicle access lane under an EPA order. After EPA changed the cleanup plan for soil in 2003, PRPs installed a soil vapor extraction system to remove contaminants from subsurface soil at the site. EPA deleted an 8-acre area of the site referred to as the Administration Parcel from the NPL in 2004. This deleted area included an administration building, a parking lot and open areas. In 2011, the site owner sold about 19 acres of the site property (the Redevelopment Parcel) to a local developer. A roofing company uses a former on-site warehouse for material storage and sales, and a smaller former warehouse building is used by a heating-and-cooling-supply business. The developer subdivided the Redevelopment Parcel into three parcels and is exploring long-term redevelopment options. EPA is overseeing groundwater extraction and treatment, associated monitoring, and intermittent operation of the soil vapor extraction system at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 12 people and generated an estimated $6,653,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Craig Farm Drum Capped Site Reuse

The 117-acre Craig Farm Drum Superfund site is in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Between 1958 and 1963, the nearby Koppers Chemical Company plant deposited drums of waste material from its production operations in two former strip mine pits at the site and covered the materials with topsoil. Waste disposal contaminated soil, groundwater and a nearby creek. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Koppers (now known as Beazer) conducted cleanup activities under EPA oversight. Cleanup included removal, solidification and placement of treated waste and contaminated soil in an on-site landfill. Beazer then capped the landfill, covered it with soil and seeds, and fenced the area. Beazer also installed a system to collect contaminated water in a storage tank for transport to an off-site wastewater treatment facility. Beazer created a 1-acre wetland to replace wetlands destroyed during construction of the landfill. In 2010, Beazer capped another part of the site to reduce groundwater discharges into the seep interceptor system. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2013.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Crater Resources, Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co. Capped Site Reuse

Crater Resources, Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co.Crater Resources, Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co.The Crater Resources, Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co. Superfund site is in Upper Merion Township, Pennsylvania. The 95-acre area consists of four inactive quarries. Beginning in 1919, Alan Wood Steel Company disposed of wastes generated by its coking facility in three of the quarries. In 1977, Keystone Coke Company purchased the Alan Wood Steel Company and continued to dispose of wastes at the site until 1980. Site investigations identified contaminated wastes, liquids, soil and sediment in the quarries. Groundwater was also contaminated. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup activities required removal of contaminated soil and sediment and capping. Groundwater monitoring and some cleanup activities are ongoing. A commercial office park is now located on the site, as well as a small part of an adjacent golf club. In 2018, the property owner and EPA reached an agreement for the property owner to complete the site’s cleanup, paving the way for residential development at the site. With EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment in mind, EPA established the Superfund Task Force in May 2017 to provide recommendations for improving and expediting site cleanups and promoting redevelopment. Based on the Superfund Task Force recommendations, EPA identified the site as a Redevelopment Opportunity site – a site with the greatest expected redevelopment potential.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 54 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 3,224 people and generated an estimated $653,043,702 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Crossley Farm

Crossley FarmCrossley FarmThe 209-acre Crossley Farm Superfund site is on Blackhead Hill in Hereford Township, Pennsylvania. A dairy farm operated on the site from 1927 until 2000. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, the Bally Case and Cooler Co. plant sent drums containing liquid waste to Crossley Farm for disposal. A 1983 investigation by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources found hazardous chemicals in residential wells near the site. In 1992, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The state issued an initial health advisory for the contaminated wells and provided clean water to residents. In 1995, cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil and buried drums. In 2000, EPA installed carbon filtration systems to remove contaminants from drinking water at 55 residences. Construction of the site’s groundwater treatment system finished in July 2012. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. In 2015, EPA installed vapor intrusion mitigation systems at 20 homes. EPA is currently evaluating a hot spot area on the farm, where the highest concentrations of contamination are found in groundwater. Dairy operations moved to another location in 2000. The farm is now used to raise corn and soybeans.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Croydon TCE Cultural/Historical Reuse

Croydon TCECroydon TCEThe Croydon TCE Superfund site covers a 4-square-mile area between Croydon and Bristol townships in Pennsylvania. The site includes residential and business areas as well as several industrial complexes. In 1985, EPA detected solvents and degreasers in groundwater and in eight residential wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA connected residences impacted by groundwater contamination to the public water supply. In 1995, EPA installed a groundwater treatment system. The system operated for many years and greatly reduced the levels of contamination in the groundwater. EPA shut off the groundwater treatment system in 2009. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will conduct a pilot study to evaluate alternative technologies to complete the groundwater cleanup. In 2016, the Heritage Conservancy took ownership of a former industrial property at the site, known locally as Croydon Woods. On May 4, 2019, the Heritage Conservancy held a ribbon cutting for the opening of the Croydon Woods Nature Preserve on the site. The preserve is one of the last remaining coastal plain forests in the state. The preserve provides publicly accessible green space in a more developed area of Bucks County. Many mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians inhabit the forest, and it also serves as a migratory stop for traveling birds. Heritage Conservancy works closely with the local Little League club and nearby Keystone Elementary School to provide field trips and educational opportunities at the property. Residential, commercial and industrial land uses are ongoing at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cryochem, Inc.

The Cryochem, Inc. Superfund site is in Worman Township, Pennsylvania. Since 1962, a metal fabrication facility has operated at the site. The 19-acre area includes several production and storage buildings and an office complex. During site operations, metal-cleaning waste drained into nearby surface waters. After a site investigation found contaminants in a production well and in nearby residential wells, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Groundwater treatment consists of extraction, treatment and discharge to surface water. Area residences have carbon filtration systems on their wells. A private company currently leases the property and continues to operate a metal fabrication facility on site. In addition, a well drilling contractor has offices and an equipment yard at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 42 people and generated an estimated $9,500,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Dorney Road Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The Dorney Road Landfill Superfund site occupies 27 acres in Upper Macungie Township, Pennsylvania. A small portion of the site extends into Longswamp Township. The site was an abandoned open-pit iron mine that was used as a municipal and industrial landfill from 1952 to 1978. The landfill received industrial sludge, batteries and petroleum products. Site investigations found contaminants in soil, leachate and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included constructing a multilayer landfill cap and installing a passive gas vapor venting system. Cleanup also included regrading, installation of a stormwater management system, building restrictions and wetlands restoration. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2018. The site’s 14 acres of wetlands are now well established with native plants, attracting waterfowl and pollinators.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Douglassville Disposal Capped Site Reuse

Douglassville DisposalDouglassville DisposalThe 52-acre Douglassville Disposal Superfund site is in Douglassville, Pennsylvania. A waste oil recycling facility operated on site from 1941 to 1986. Site operators kept waste oil sludge in on-site lagoons, which washed into the Schuylkill River during flooding in 1970 and 1972. Site operators mixed waste oil sludges into site soils. They also stored leaking drums on site from 1979 to 1982. Investigations detected contaminants in groundwater, surface water, soil and river sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included dismantling the on-site tank farm and processing equipment as well as capping the former waste lagoon and contaminated soil areas. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The site is currently in recreational reuse; area activities include hiking, biking and hunting. The Schuylkill River Greenway Association has also extended the Schuylkill River Trail across the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Drake Chemical Capped Site Reuse

The 8-acre Drake Chemical Superfund site is in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. A chemical manufacturing plant was active on site from the 1960s to 1981. Site operators filled open areas on site with chemical sludge, resulting in widespread soil contamination. Groundwater and on-site structures also contained contamination. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA removed soil in the leachate runoff area and directed the runoff into a sewer line in 1986. Cleanup activities also included excavating a drainage lagoon, treating contaminated soil on site, demolishing buildings and other on-site structures, and disposing of materials off site. EPA began operating a groundwater treatment system in 2000. The treatment system continues to operate. Today, a commercial storage facility uses part of the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Dublin TCE Site

The Dublin TCE Superfund site is in Dublin Borough, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Over the last 50 years, several manufacturing facilities operated at the 4.5-acre area. During its operations, Kollsman Motor Corporation reportedly used and disposed of solvents on site. In 1986, the Bucks County Health Department identified contamination attributed to site operations in drinking water wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA completed construction of an alternate water supply for affected homes and businesses in 1998. The site’s potentially responsible party is currently working with EPA to treat groundwater contamination. The site owner uses the property for the storage and repair of antique cars and leases space to other businesses.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 3 people and generated an estimated $198,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Eastern Diversified Metals

The 26-acre Eastern Diversified Metals Superfund site is in Rush Township, Pennsylvania. From 1966 to 1977, Eastern Diversified Metals disposed of waste materials from copper and aluminum electrical wires on site. The company used a water treatment plant to collect and treat shallow groundwater. Occasional overflows resulted in runoff into the Little Schuylkill River, a fishing and recreation resource. Following investigations, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included removing contaminated materials, installing a runoff collection and treatment system, and consolidating and capping a large waste pile. Cleanup construction finished in 2008. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The property containing the site’s former processing building was cleaned up in 2005 and is now in industrial use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Elizabethtown Landfill Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Elizabethtown Landfill Superfund site is near Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania. From 1958 to 1973, an unlicensed landfill operated in a former sandstone quarry at the 16-acre site. The landfill accepted industrial and municipal wastes from nearby businesses and communities. Improper waste disposal resulted in contaminated groundwater and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1986, one of the potentially responsible parties installed a clay cap over part of the site as well as methane control vents and a leachate collection system. The remainder of the site was capped in 2003 with an asphalt cap. Planning for groundwater cleanup is ongoing. Residential use continues in areas with groundwater contamination; the responsible parties conducted a vapor intrusion study and continue to monitor groundwater to ensure that there are no unacceptable exposures. The Elizabethtown Area Water Authority built a water storage tower on the site outside the capped area to supply water to the surrounding area. West Donegal Township uses the site’s asphalt cap for its National Night Out annual community event.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Enterprise Avenue Capped Site Reuse

The 57-acre Enterprise Avenue Superfund site is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For five years, the city of Philadelphia used the area to dispose of incineration residue, fly ash and bulky debris. Several waste handling companies also illegally buried drums containing industrial and chemical wastes on site. Improper disposal practices resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The city removed contaminated soil and capped the landfill. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Monitored natural attenuation is currently being evaluated as a groundwater remediation option at the site. After completing cleanup construction, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1986. In 1999, the Philadelphia Department of Aviation completed a 5,000-foot commuter runway for Philadelphia International Airport on site. The runway reduces flight delays and traffic congestion at the airport.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Fischer & Porter Co.

The roughly 38-acre Fischer & Porter Co. Superfund site is in Warminster Township, Pennsylvania. Fischer & Porter Company (F&P), a producer of flow meters and process control equipment, conducted testing and manufacturing operations on site. In the early 1980s, EPA identified contamination in industrial supply wells on site and in public water supply wells in Warminster Township and the borough of Hatboro. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included installing groundwater treatment systems for industrial wells and public water supply wells. The site’s buildings were sold to redevelopers and have been renovated into office and warehouse space. F&P (now ABB Instrumentation) continues to lease office space at the site and operates the groundwater pumping and treatment remedy. Starting in 2000, a company unrelated to Fischer & Porter purchased undeveloped parts of the site and entered into a prospective purchaser agreement (PPA) with EPA. A PPA encourages the redevelopment of previously contaminated property by addressing purchaser liability concerns. With the PPA in place, the company built two buildings, providing over 100,000 square feet of office, manufacturing and warehouse space. Commercial and manufacturing businesses are active on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 778 people and generated an estimated $78,135,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Gerald Cohen Property

The 32-acre Gerald Cohen Property site is in Erie, Pennsylvania. A-1 Auto operated a scrap metal and auto salvage yard at the site. Improper disposal at the scrapyard and illegal dumping led to contamination of soil with lead, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and other contaminants. EPA removed several thousand cubic yards of contaminated soil from the site in 1991 and 1995. Local and state agencies completed the site’s cleanup, including removing 60,000 waste tires. In 2005, the city of Erie redeveloped the site as a business park with new roads and utilities. A printing company is now operating at the business park.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Havertown PCP Capped Site Reuse

Havertown PCPHavertown PCPThe 12-acre Havertown PCP Superfund site is in Havertown Township, Pennsylvania. From 1947 to 1991, National Wood Preservers operated a wood treatment facility at the site. The company reportedly poured liquid wastes on surface soil and disposed of liquid wastes in a well. After sampling identified contamination in groundwater, surface water and soil, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal and disposal of hazardous liquid, solid and sludge wastes. After removing all site buildings, workers capped areas of contaminated soil. Cleanup finished in 2010. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Several land uses are currently located on the site. Demolition of the former Philadelphia Chewing Gum Corporation factory made way for the Freedom Valley YMCA. The $22 million facility, which includes three pools, a gymnasium, wellness center, locker rooms, indoor track and educational care center, opened in October 2013. A paved recreational trail connects the YMCA to the nearby Pennsy Trail. In 2015, EPA Region 3 recognized the YMCA facility’s leadership with its Excellence in Site Reuse award. EPA, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and Haverford Township also coordinated on the construction of a storage facility on part of the capped area at the site. Other businesses on the site include a restaurant and a convenience store, which remained open for business during cleanup. EPA, PADEP and Haverford Township will continue to work with interested parties to support the site’s return to safe and productive use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 414 people and generated an estimated $8,907,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Heleva Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The Heleva Landfill Superfund site is in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The 93-acre area includes a 26-acre capped landfill. Open-pit iron ore mining operations in the late 1800s left four open, water-filled pits at the site. A sanitary landfill began operating on site in 1967. It accepted general mixed refuse, including paper, wood and orchard wastes. The landfill also accepted unconfirmed types and amounts of industrial wastes, including solvents. After the landfill’s closure in 1981, landfill operators capped the wastes in place. After sampling detected contamination in a groundwater well, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included installation of a new landfill cover, a passive gas venting system, and a groundwater pump-and-treat system. Cleanup also included extension of the public water supply to 38 residences impacted by site contamination. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Site uses include a landscaping business, which uses 1 acre outside the capped area for storage. In 2013, 90 percent of the landfill gas vents on the cap were closed, which allowed a local farmer to harvest the vegetation on the cap as hay. The hay is stored on site in silage bags.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Henderson Road Capped Site Reuse

The 7-acre Henderson Road Superfund site is in Upper Merion Township, Pennsylvania. In the 1970s, O’Hara Sanitation Company used the area for waste storage and recycling, vehicle maintenance and parking, and office facilities. Site operators used a former industrial water supply well to dispose of industrial liquid wastes. EPA identified groundwater contamination and a contaminated landfill on the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included landfill capping and groundwater and leachate monitoring. Cleanup activities also included erosion repair and methane monitoring. A waste management company now uses the site for offices and a maintenance garage.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 35 people and generated an estimated $30,011,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Industrial Lane Capped Site Reuse

The Industrial Lane Superfund site is near Easton, Pennsylvania. It includes an industrial area and a 30-acre sanitary landfill. An unlined landfill operated on site from 1961 to 1988. Its operations resulted in groundwater contamination. Iron ore extraction and iron works operations may also have contributed to site contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included providing an alternate drinking water source to affected residences, closing the unlined municipal landfill and treating contaminated groundwater. A permitted, lined landfill continues to operate on top of and next to the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business.  For additional information click here.

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Jacks Creek/Sitkin Smelting & Refining, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 115-acre Jacks Creek/Sitkin Smelting & Refining, Inc. Superfund site is in a rural agricultural area of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. From 1958 to 1977, Sitkin Smelting Company operated a smelting and precious metals reclamation facility on site. Investigations identified lead and other metals in site soils. Sediment contamination along Jacks Creek, a recreational area for fishermen, prompted a fish consumption advisory. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included demolishing on-site buildings; removing underground storage tanks, ash material, transformers and drums; removing and treating contaminated soil; and constructing a multi-layer cap. Cleanup activities also included floodplain restoration and wetland restoration. Monitoring is ongoing. A scrap metal recycling facility continues to operate on the site. Restored wetland areas on the site, including six vernal pools, are providing ecological habitat for amphibian, reptile and bird species. Parts of the site also continue to be used by a trucking company and a church.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 85 people and generated an estimated $10,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Jackson Ceramix, Inc.

The Jackson Ceramix Superfund site is in the borough of Falls Creek, Pennsylvania. The Site is about 235 acres in size including the 200-acre Sandy Lick Creek floodplain, the 21-acre former manufacturing area as well as the adjacent 5.5-acre baseball field area and the 8-acre northern drainage channel/former lagoon. From 1917 to 1985, the former facility manufactured and painted chinaware. Chemicals and metals used in the china manufacturing process included lead and other metals, as well as organic compounds. Poor chemical handling practices at the plant as well as repeated wastewater discharges led to the contamination of soils, sediments, groundwater and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2005. EPA has investigated all contaminated media to assess the nature and extent of contamination as well as the risks posed to human health and the environment. EPA is now evaluating cleanup options. Recreational use continues at the baseball field area. In 2016, the borough purchased a 12-acre parcel of the former manufacturing area with the goal of attracting industry and jobs. Prior to the purchase, the borough coordinated with EPA and obtained comfort letters. Most recently, the borough has expressed renewed interest in seeking reuse assistance from EPA. EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative will provide support for a reuse assessment. EPA and its reuse support contractor will visit the site in July 2019 and meet with the borough managers to discuss reuse potential at the site. EPA has established a strong working relationship with the borough so that redevelopment plans can inform EPA’s ongoing remedial process. EPA is prioritizing cleanup of the area that the borough plans to redevelop.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Keystone Sanitation Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Keystone Sanitation LandfillKeystone Sanitation LandfillThe 70-acre Keystone Sanitation Landfill Superfund site is a privately-owned property in a rural part of Union Township in Adams County, Pennsylvania. The owners, who live in a single-family residence on site, began accepting construction debris, white goods and some hazardous wastes in 1966. The landfill expanded to cover about 48 acres at the time of its closure in 1992. Investigations identified contaminants in groundwater, surface water and sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup included groundwater around the landfill and at the residence and extraction of contaminated vapor in the soils. Operation of the groundwater extraction and treatment system began in 2000. Operation of the landfill gas extraction system began in 2003. Both systems continue to operate. Grass and a low-permeability soil cover were placed over the landfill as part of the cleanup. The single-family residence on site remains occupied.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Kimberton

KimbertonKimbertonThe 45-acre Kimberton Superfund site is in Kimberton Borough, East Pikeland Township, Pennsylvania. Beginning in 1947, site operators made resins, textiles and asphalt products on site. From 1947 to 1959, operators disposed of various residues in eight lagoons. Site investigations confirmed contamination of soil and groundwater with site-related chemicals. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup workers removed drums, excavated lagoons and treated residential wells. The site’s potentially responsible parties provided an alternate source of drinking water to 25 nearby residences and businesses until completion of the public water supply connection in 1992. Groundwater treatment began at the site in 1993 and continues today. An asphalt roofing products manufacturing facility began operating at the site in 1969. Its plant continued to operate during cleanup and remains active today. The company’s facilities include the main plant, a warehouse, office buildings and the site’s groundwater treatment plant.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 300 people and generated an estimated $193,906,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Lansdowne Radiation Site

The Lansdowne Radiation Superfund site is in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. From 1924 to 1944, a University of Pennsylvania chemistry and physics professor processed enriched radium ore in the basement of his home. Processing of the ore resulted in radioactive contamination of the three-story duplex house where he lived. Processing also contaminated two garages on the property, two garages on neighboring properties, municipal sewers, sidewalks, the street and soil on eight properties. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. EPA cleanup included demolition of the house; cleanup of contaminated soil, sidewalks and portions of the street; street repaving; and replacement of the sewer line. EPA disposed of contaminated materials at an off-site waste disposal facility. EPA then backfilled and reseeded the excavated areas. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1991. The site remains part of a residential neighborhood.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 20189, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Lindane Dump Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

The Lindane Dump Superfund site is in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The site includes two areas: a 14-acre park property and a 47.5-acre area that includes a landfill. From 1850 to 1986, several companies used the area for waste disposal. Wastes included materials from mining, chemical manufacturing, electrical generation, steel manufacturing and building demolition. EPA found contamination in groundwater, soil and leachate. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included capping the site and leachate collection and treatment. Operation and maintenance activities are ongoing. Harrison Township built the Alsco Community Park on site in 1977. Following cleanup, a restored Alsco Community Park reopened to the public in 1999. The park now includes tennis courts, baseball fields, a utility building, walking paths, picnic areas, open space and parking.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Lower Darby Creek Area Green Infrastructure Reuse

Lower Darby Creek AreaLower Darby Creek AreaThe Lower Darby Creek Area Superfund site is located along Darby and Cobbs creeks in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania. The site consists of two landfills – the Clearview Landfill and the Folcroft Landfill. The landfills operated from the 1950s to the 1970s. They accepted municipal, demolition and hospital wastes. Site operators placed wastes and landfill material along the edges of the creek. The landfills have likely impacted adjacent creeks and wetlands through surface erosion, runoff and seeps. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001. EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative supported a regional seed project at the site in 2011 resulting in a reuse assessment outlining potential future use opportunities for the site. In 2011 and 2012, EPA excavated and disposed of almost 4,000 tons of highly-contaminated waste. In 2016, EPA began cleaning up residential yards impacted by the Clearview Landfill. EPA has cleaned up almost all of the affected yards and expects to clean up the remaining yards in the summer of 2019. EPA will also address contaminated soil in the City Park. Parts of the park remain open for public use during the cleanup. EPA is helping several businesses currently located on the landfill to relocate their operations. EPA is working with potentially responsible parties (PRPs) on cleanup plans for Folcroft Landfill. EPA is also conducting a comprehensive human health and ecological risk assessment for the aquatic portions of the site. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages Folcroft Landfill as part of the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. As part of cleanup planning, EPA continues to work closely with the site’s community advisory group and technical assistance grantee.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 13 people and generated an estimated $1,959,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

  • Superfund Site Profile Page
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McAdoo Associates Capped Site Reuse

The McAdoo Associates Superfund site consists of two separate areas. The 8-acre McAdoo Kline Township (MKT) area is in Kline Township, Pennsylvania. The 1-acre McAdoo Blaine Street (MBS) area is in McAdoo Borough, Pennsylvania. Coal mining and metal recycling operations took place at MKT from the 1880s to the 1960s. Prior to 1972, a heating oil and gasoline storage business operated at MBS. EPA investigations identified contaminated soil and groundwater at both areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities at MKT included removing storage tanks and soil, capping, and monitoring groundwater. Potentially responsible parties also studied possible mine collapse. Cleanup activities at MBS included storage tank emptying and removal, soil removal, light non-aqueous phase liquid removal, and groundwater monitoring. MKT is currently capped, fenced and not in use. In 1999, a local business owner purchased MBS through a prospective purchaser agreement with EPA. The owner built a small warehouse/storage facility on site. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Metal Bank Capped Site Reuse

The 10-acre Metal Bank Superfund site is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A scrap metal and transformer salvage facility operated at the site. Salvaging metal and transformers resulted in releases of oil to the Delaware River, contaminating surface water and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA approved the site’s remedial design in 2008. Cleanup included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and sediment, removal and disposal of an underground storage tank, and installation of a marine cap to contain sediments in the Delaware River. Cleanup finished in 2010. Monitoring and maintenance are ongoing. In 2016, adjacent property owners bought the site property. A material recovery operation has expanded onto the site. With EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment in mind, EPA established the Superfund Task Force in May 2017 to provide recommendations for improving and expediting site cleanups and promoting redevelopment. Based on the Superfund Task Force recommendations, EPA identified the site as a Redevelopment Opportunity site – a site with the greatest expected redevelopment potential.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 110 people and generated an estimated $20,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Middletown Air Field

The 500-acre Middletown Air Field Superfund site is located between Middletown and Highspire in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. From 1898 to 1966, the federal government owned and operated Army Camp George Gordon Meade and later Olmstead Air Force Base on site. Aircraft maintenance, overhauling and testing took place at the site. These activities resulted in contamination of wells, groundwater and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA identified five disposal areas as potential sources of groundwater contamination. Cleanup activities included installation of groundwater treatment and monitoring systems. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. Harrisburg International Airport opened on site in 1967 and continues to operate. Other site uses include a Pennsylvania State University Campus, Pennsylvania Air National Guard, residential apartments, several commercial and industrial properties, and a storage and vehicle maintenance area for the Middletown School District.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 57 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,781 people and generated an estimated $187,614,277 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Mill Creek Dump Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Mill Creek DumpMill Creek DumpThe 124-acre Mill Creek Dump Superfund site is in Millcreek, Pennsylvania. The site includes 84 acres of former freshwater wetlands and a 40-acre strip of land next to Conrail railroad tracks. For 40 years, the site was used as an unpermitted landfill for foundry sands, solvents, waste oils, and other industrial and municipal wastes. These practices resulted in contamination of soil, sediments and groundwater. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources closed the dump in 1981. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included groundwater treatment, soil capping, construction of a flood retention basin, and wetlands replacement. In 1996, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) and Millcreek Township worked with EPA to modify the cap design to allow for development of a golf course. The golf course, the Millcreek Golf and Learning Center, opened in 2001. PRPs donated the nine-hole golf course and driving range property to Millcreek Township in 2002. The golf course closed in 2011 to allow construction of the Erie International Airport runway extension project. The project required 12 acres of the cap and golf course area. The runway extension opened in November 2012. The driving range reopened in August 2014. The township has plans to renovate and reopen the golf course when funding and appropriate property management become available.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $1,448,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Modern Sanitation Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 66-acre Modern Sanitation Landfill Superfund site is in the townships of Windsor and Lower Windsor in Pennsylvania. The site is part of the 371-acre Modern Landfill, an active permitted facility. In the 1940s, a landfill on site was used for domestic dumping. Between 1976 and 1979, the unlined facility reportedly received hazardous wastes. Later investigations found contamination in soil, groundwater, surface water, and private wells and springs near the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup involved capping 66 acres of the original landfill portion of the site. Horizontal and vertical expansions of the permitted facility have resulted in landfill cells constructed on top of part of the site. The commonwealth of Pennsylvania provides oversight of the Modern Landfill’s operations. Landfill systems include leachate collection, groundwater extraction and treatment, and gas collection.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 34 people and generated an estimated $9,057,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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MW Manufacturing

The 15-acre Metal Wire (MW) Manufacturing Superfund site is located in Valley Township, Pennsylvania. A scrap wire recovery business operated on site until 1993. Mechanical and chemical processes at the site made hazardous wastes that were stored or dumped on the property. These activities contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil and sediment. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included removing and solidifying wastes, treating groundwater, connecting affected residences to the public water supply, and placing land use controls on the site. Crews completed cleanup in 2005. In May 2012, Valley Township acquired the property. It currently uses the concrete slab and garage for material and equipment storage. The Township is also considering plans to relocate its main office to the property. EPA will continue to work with site owners to ensure safe and appropriate reuse of the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 1

The North Penn - Area 1 Superfund site is in Souderton, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites in the North Penn area that contributes to area-wide groundwater contamination. The site includes three former dry-cleaning facilities. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA excavated tons of contaminated soil from two of the dry-cleaning properties. EPA also installed a groundwater extraction system, which operated until 2005. After further investigations found high levels of contamination in a monitoring well, EPA installed a pump to remove contaminated water and discharge it to a sanitary sewer. EPA continues to monitor site groundwater. One of the former dry-cleaning facilities is currently vacant. The second is an active commercial facility. The third site property, Parkside Apartments, originally included a dry-cleaning facility. The apartments remain a residential community.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 64 people and generated an estimated $6,784,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 2 Capped Site Reuse

The 87-acre North Penn - Area 2 Superfund site is in Hatfield, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area as contributing to area-wide groundwater contamination. Investigations focused on contamination found at two properties – the former Ametek facility and the former Steiert property. From 1963 to 1986, the Ametek facility used a degreasing solvent in its manufacturing processes. In 1980, the North Penn Water Authority detected site-related contaminants in on-site and downgradient wells. Operations also resulted in contamination of soil at both properties and sediment at the Steiert property. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup efforts in 1987 and 1995 removed contaminated soil and sediments from the Ametek property. These efforts also stabilized soil and sediments under a vegetated cap. In 2007, cleanup activities at the Steiert property included removal and disposal of contaminated soil and sediment. Cleanup efforts protected mature trees on site. Additional cleanup at the Ametek facility included soil and sediment removal and upgrades to the groundwater pumping system. This work finished in 2012. Penn Color currently operates a pigment production facility at the former Ametek facility. An environmental consulting firm also operates on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 225 people and generated an estimated $10,249,508 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 5

The 5-square-mile North Penn - Area 5 Superfund site is in Colmar, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area as contributing to area-wide groundwater contamination. Since the late 1940s, various industries have operated on the site. These include an electronic communication systems and components manufacturing facility, an automobile parts manufacturing facility, a packaging manufacturer, and smaller facilities associated with a variety of products and services. Site investigations found industrial contamination in groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup efforts at the site are ongoing. The site includes commercial and industrial businesses, residences, parkland and farmland.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 980 people and generated an estimated $388,081,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 6

The North Penn - Area 6 Superfund site is an area of groundwater contamination in and around the borough of Lansdale, Pennsylvania. The site is one of several Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area as contributing to area-wide groundwater contamination. Investigations found chemicals related to solvents and degreasers in groundwater at the site. EPA identified 26 facilities in the Lansdale area as possible sources of contamination due to their use of site-related solvents. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA extended the public water supply to 20 residences with contaminated wells. Cleanup activities addressed contaminated soil at several properties. Groundwater treatment systems continue to operate. Light industrial, commercial and residential land uses are currently located on site. EPA removed the 6.5-acre Administrative Parcel from the NPL in 2017. The owner of this parcel is redeveloping the property as residential condominiums.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 12 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 214 people and generated an estimated $84,592,252 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 7

The 650-acre North Penn - Area 7 Superfund site is in North Wales, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area as contributing to area-wide groundwater contamination. Waste from five former industrial facilities contaminated groundwater and soil at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities include soil removal, soil treatment and pumping of contaminated wells. Agreements between EPA and one property owner enabled soil removal and allowed construction of an apartment complex. Cleanup of the Spra-Fin Inc. portion of the site finished in 2011. EPA completed a site-wide study looking at the potential for harmful vapors to enter buildings in 2013. The study looked at residential, commercial, industrial and daycare properties. The study concluded that no action is needed. Cleanup planning for source area properties and site-wide groundwater studies are ongoing. Several industrial facilities and commercial businesses operate at the site. Single family and apartment homes are also on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 811 people and generated an estimated $769,950,824 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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North Penn - Area 12

The North Penn - Area 12 Superfund site is in Worcester, Pennsylvania. The site includes the 25-acre former Transicoil facility, a 12-acre former missile control facility and an area of associated groundwater contamination. Electric motor manufacturing took place at the site from 1952 to 1991. The company disposed of solvent and waste oils in an underground storage tank, in the septic system and at times directly on the ground. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included groundwater treatment and the extension of the public water supply to affected residences and businesses. In 1998, Techni-Tool, a catalog tool company, purchased the site property after signing a prospective purchaser agreement with EPA. Since 2000, the company has operated a distribution facility on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 75 people and generated an estimated $37,500,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Novak Sanitary Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 65-acre Novak Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is in a residential community near Allentown, Pennsylvania. This privately-owned landfill operated from the late 1950s to 1990. The landfill accepted demolition, municipal and industrial wastes. For 20 years, landfill operators disposed of wastes in unlined trenches. Site investigations determined that these activities contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included fence installation, leachate collection, landfill venting and capping, groundwater monitoring, and land use controls. EPA completed construction of the site’s landfill cap and leachate collection system in 2002. The leachate collection system was discontinued in 2015. EPA plans to remove the groundwater portion of the site from the NPL. A utility easement crosses the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Ohio River Park Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

golf dome and track at the siteOhio River ParkThe Ohio River Park Superfund site is located on Neville Island in Pennsylvania, in the middle of the Ohio River. A municipal waste landfill for Neville Township operated at the site from the 1930s until the mid-1950s. In 1978, Allegheny County began developing the site as a park, but stopped construction after discovering industrial waste. Waste disposal practices contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included removing contaminated soil, covering waste with a multi-layer cap, and covering remaining site areas with an erosion cap. After placing use restrictions on the property, developers began construction of a multi-purpose recreation center. The Island Sports Center began its first full season of operations in 1998. In 2003, Robert Morris University bought the site property and continues to operate the Island Sports Center. The facilities include two indoor ice-skating rinks, outdoor inline/ice rink facilities, a golf dome and golf training facility, a running track with center field space, a shot-put training area, sports equipment shops, dining facilities, paved parking areas and a mini-golf course. Part of the outdoor track, golf dome and a parking area are on top of the site’s large capped area. The Neville Island end of the Coraopolis Bridge, and associated roadways, are also located on part of the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 18 people and generated an estimated $719,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Old City of York Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Residence on the siteOld City of York LandfillThe 178-acre Old City of York Landfill Superfund site is in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania. From 1961 to 1975, the city of York operated a 56-acre landfill on site that reportedly accepted industrial wastes. In 1981, site investigations found contamination from the landfill in groundwater and nearby domestic wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included restoring 16 acres of soil cover that had eroded from the landfill, groundwater treatment, removing contaminated sediment, and monitoring surface water. In 2000, treatment of groundwater ended and monitoring of natural processes to clean up groundwater began. A private home is currently located on the site. The homeowner uses portions of the site for grazing horses and recreation.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Palmerton Zinc Pile

Palmerton Zinc PilePalmerton Zinc PileThe Palmerton Zinc Pile Superfund site is in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. Former primary zinc smelting operations from two plants in Palmerton resulted in area-wide contamination. The site includes Blue Mountain, a large smelting residue pile called the Cinder Bank and much of the surrounding valley north of Blue Mountain. For nearly 80 years, the New Jersey Zinc Company disposed of 33 million tons of smelting waste at the site. Former smelting operations released heavy metals into the valley, causing the widespread loss of trees across about 4,000 acres of Blue Mountain. Erosion of contaminated soils in this barren area contaminated surface water in Aquashicola Creek and the Lehigh River. Heavy metals contaminated dust, soil, shallow groundwater and surface water. The presence of lead in children’s blood samples triggered public health and environmental investigations. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included revegetation of Blue Mountain, surface water diversion and treatment, and soil cleanup on private properties. EPA completed residential property cleanups in 2005. Several commercial businesses are located within the area of residential property cleanup. EPA is currently developing a cleanup plan for shallow groundwater and surface water. A hazardous waste recycler purchased one of the smelters in 1981. The business continues to operate on site today. Public water supply wells for the community are located at the base of Blue Mountain. To date, these wells have not been impacted by contamination. In 2002, the Lehigh Gap Nature Center (LGNC) purchased over 750 acres of property along Blue Mountain. The responsible parties, in cooperation with LGNC, began erosion stabilization and revegetation efforts with native grasses in 2003. The same year, the Lehigh Gap Wildlife Refuge officially opened to the public. Today, over 13,000 trees and native grasses cover 3,000 acres of Blue Mountain. The refuge provides habitat for local wildlife and migratory species while also stabilizing soils, minimizing erosion and improving water quality. The refuge has a vast trail system for hikers, birders and outdoors enthusiasts. It also offers programs in environmental education, wildlife viewing and native habitat restoration research. In 2010, a new visitor and education center opened at the site. It includes a lobby, research library and classroom/laboratory space. A grant from the Green Mountain Energy Sun Club enabled the LGNC to install solar panels at the center in 2018. The solar panels are designed to provide 100 percent of the center’s electricity needs. EPA Region 3 recognized LGNC’s efforts with its Excellence in Site Reuse award in 2014.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 185 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,783 people and generated an estimated $248,908,115 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Presque Isle

Presque IslePresque IsleThe Presque Isle Superfund site is located on the Presque Isle State Park peninsula in Erie County, Pennsylvania. From the early 1970s until the early 1980s, discharge of a toxic black liquid released contamination into the air, soil and shallow groundwater. Investigations identified an unplugged natural gas well, which was dug in 1910 and abandoned in 1920, as the source of the discharge. The discharge contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included plugging the leaking well with cement down to 900 feet. Monitoring has not detected discharge since 1982. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1988. The site is a public recreation area used for picnicking, swimming and fishing. The site also provides habitat for deer, squirrels and waterfowl.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Price Battery Lead Smelter

The Price Battery Lead Smelter Superfund site is a 1.2-square-mile area in Hamburg, Pennsylvania. The Price Battery plant operated on site from 1940 to the mid-1990s. Price Battery manufacturing contaminated the 9-acre plant and surrounding areas with lead, arsenic and antimony. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2005. EPA cleaned up 555 residential yards and decontaminated the interiors of 402 homes. EPA completed the residential portion of the cleanup in 2013. Residential cleanup included homes as well as areas that children are likely to frequent, such as schools, churches and parks. The potentially responsible party completed the cleanup of the former Price Battery plant property in 2019. EPA’s ecological assessment of Kaercher and Mill creeks is ongoing. A small portion of the site remains in continued industrial and commercial uses.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Publicker Industries, Inc.

The 40-acre Publicker Industries Inc. Superfund site is located along the Delaware River in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Publicker Industries produced liquor and industrial alcohols at the site. The company later used the area as a petroleum product and chemical storage facility. Publicker Industries abandoned the site in 1986. Abandoned site equipment included tanks, drums, chemical laboratories, production buildings, warehouses, a power plant, and aboveground and underground process lines. Wastes abandoned at the site posed a threat of fire and explosion. Site activities led to contamination of groundwater, soil and debris. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup involved the removal and off-site disposal of contaminated debris and soil, the capping and sealing of groundwater wells, asbestos removal, and repair of electric and stormwater utilities. The site was one of the first in the country where a prospective purchaser agreement (PPA) with EPA supported redevelopment and economic revitalization. In 1997, EPA recognized the site as the nation’s 500th Superfund site to achieve the construction completion milestone. In 2000, EPA took the site off the NPL. Current site uses include a marine cargo container staging area for Port of Philadelphia operations.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Raymark Capped Site Reuse

The 7-acre Raymark Superfund site is in Hatboro, Pennsylvania. From 1948 to 1972, a metal fabrication shop operated on site. Operators disposed of treated wastes and untreated wastewater from electroplating and degreasing processes in unlined lagoons on site. Operators also stored a volatile organic compound in outdoor and above-ground tanks on site. These storage and disposal practices resulted in groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup workers installed a groundwater treatment system. They also put a cap in place to contain remaining waste. In 2005, C&L Rivet Company purchased the site property. C&L Rivet Company continues metal fabrication operations on site today. Commercial reuses are located on site as well. EPA is currently conducting a study to verify that harmful vapors from the groundwater contamination are not accumulating in buildings or structures at or near the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 8 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 42 people and generated an estimated $6,408,489 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Recticon/Allied Steel Corp.

Recticon/Allied Steel Corp.Recticon/Allied Steel Corp.The 5-acre Recticon/Allied Steel Corp. Superfund site is in East Coventry Township, Pennsylvania. The site includes two properties – the former Recticon facility and the Allied Steel facility. Recticon, a subsidiary of Rockwell International, made silicon wafers at the site from 1974 to 1981. Allied Steel Products Corporation manufactured steel at the site from 1972 to 1988. Manufacturing activities contaminated on-site and private wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Residents impacted by contaminated groundwater received water filtration systems until their connection to municipal water supply lines in 1999. Cleanup activities included removing contaminated soils and disposing of them off site and installing a groundwater treatment system. Longstreth Corporation purchased the Allied Steel property after signing a prospective purchaser agreement (PPA) with EPA in 2002. The company currently operates a sports equipment business and retail store on site. A marble and granite showroom also operates on the Recticon property. Site groundwater has been at or below cleanup action levels since 2011. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2018.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 46 people and generated an estimated $25,337,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Resin Disposal Capped Site Reuse

The 26-acre Resin Disposal Superfund site is in Jefferson Borough, Pennsylvania. The site includes a 2-acre landfill, which received industrial wastes from 1949 until 1964. Landfill operations resulted in contamination of soil, groundwater and surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included landfill capping, fencing and collection of landfill liquids (leachate). Leachate is processed in an oil/water separator. Treated water goes to the sanitary sewer and the oil fraction is transported off site for disposal/recycling. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2003. After a series of leachate releases between 2010 and 2012, the site’s potentially responsible parties upgraded the leachate collection system. The site owner has installed birdhouses to attract migratory birds. Native vegetation at the site provides habitat for local wildlife.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Revere Chemical Co. Capped Site Reuse

The 113-acre Revere Chemical Co. Superfund site is in Nockamixon Township, Pennsylvania. Until abandoning the site property in 1970, Revere Chemical Company operated a processing facility for acid and metal-plating waste. The company stored hazardous wastes in drums, piles and unlined earthen pits. Wastes contaminated surrounding soil, groundwater and Rapp Creek, which flows through Nockamixon. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. EPA worked with the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the Revere Steering Committee, a group of 12 potentially responsible parties (PRPs), to clean up the site and prepare it for reuse. The PRPs capped the contamination and planted wildflowers on top of the cap. In 2002, Nockamixon Township took ownership of the site. Nockamixon Township allows use of the site for recreational purposes such as hiking and stargazing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Ryeland Road Arsenic Site

The restored wetland habitat on the siteRyeland Road Arsenic SiteThe 7.3-acre Ryeland Road Arsenic Superfund site is in Heidelberg Township, Pennsylvania. It consists of five parcels of land. Four parcels on the northern side of West Ryeland Road housed a chemical manufacturing facility. Until 1942, Standard Chemical Works Corporation (SCWC) and Allegheny Chemical Corporation (ACC) manufactured pesticides, fungicides, paints and varnishes here. In the late 1970s, residential development began on these four parcels of land. SCWC and ACC used the fifth parcel, on the southern side of West Ryeland Road, primarily for waste disposal. Site investigations found high levels of arsenic and lead in soil at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. Cleanup activities began in 2006. Cleanup included permanently relocating residents in three on-site homes, demolishing vacated homes, and removing contaminated soil and disposing of it off site. The cleanup also removed contaminated soil from adjacent residential properties. EPA conducted innovative cleanup and restoration activities on the forested and wetland-covered portion of the site. This has included planting ferns to remove arsenic from soil before it can impact the stream system and properties downstream from the site. EPA is currently completing groundwater studies to perform a remedy for contaminated groundwater. Part of the site remains in agricultural use. EPA has restored residential properties that were contaminated. Heidelberg Township currently owns the four parcels cleaned up by EPA. The Township built a building on one parcel, which a local youth sports league currently uses for equipment storage.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Saegertown Industrial Area

Entrance to the LORD Corporation, Saegertown Operations facilitySaegertown Industrial AreaThe 100-acre Saegertown Industrial Area Superfund site is in Saegertown, Pennsylvania. From the mid-1950s to 1965, General American Transportation Corporation (GATX) cleaned and repaired railroad tank cars at the site. The Saegertown Manufacturing Corporation began producing small steel components on site in 1965 and continues to operate on site today. In 1980, the state identified contamination in a municipal supply well. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included on-site treatment for groundwater, sludge and soil contamination, removal of tons of soil and sludge from the GATX area, and treatment and disposal of contaminated soil and sludge. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) led the cleanup under EPA oversight. After cleanup, the PRP backfilled and reseeded site areas. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. The site remains in continued industrial use. Lord Corporation continues to produce adhesives, urethane coatings and rubber chemicals at the site, and began an $80-million expansion project in 2018.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 230 people and generated an estimated $72,187,500 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Sharon Steel Corp. (Farrell Works Disposal Area) Capped Site Reuse

Sharon Steel Corp (Farrell Works Disposal Area)Sharon Steel Corp (Farrell Works Disposal Area)The 325-acre Sharon Steel Corporation (Farrell Works Disposal Area) Superfund site is in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The site is close to the Pennsylvania/Ohio state border. Starting in 1900, the Sharon Steel Corporation used the area to dispose of furnace slag and sludge. From 1949 to 1981, site operators dumped millions of gallons of waste acid over the slag to try to neutralize the acid. Acid and metals from the slag and sludge migrated into soil and groundwater, leaving the site contaminated. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. In 2000, under the terms of a prospective purchaser agreement (PPA), EPA worked with a local company to enable the reuse of slag at the site for construction and road projects. In 2006, EPA divided the site into two areas so that site businesses (an asphalt plant and trucking company) could continue to operate during cleanup. In 2006, EPA selected a remedy for part of the site. It includes regrading, contouring and treating contaminated slag and sludge with a biosolids cap, stabilizing eroded river banks, land and groundwater use restrictions, and long-term groundwater, surface water and sediment monitoring. It also includes restoration of 100 acres of wetlands on the site. Remedial construction for the northern portion of the site (about 50 acres) began in 2018 and will continue through early 2021.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 10 people and generated an estimated $2,562,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Stanley Kessler

The 3-acre Stanley Kessler Superfund site is in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. A welding wire degreasing and repackaging business operated on site from the 1960s to 2000. During operations, site operators improperly disposed of solvent degreasers. In 1979, sampling detected contaminants in the Upper Merion Reservoir, a source of drinking water for the area. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included groundwater treatment. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. An industrial supply wholesale merchant currently operates on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 22 people and generated an estimated $10,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Strasburg Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 302-acre Strasburg Landfill Superfund site is in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The permitted landfill received municipal and industrial wastes from 1978 to 1983. In 1983, the state found contamination in on-site monitoring wells and in a private well downgradient of the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included landfill capping, leachate collection and treatment, and fencing the site. Cleanup finished in 1999. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection now maintains the cap and operates the leachate collection and treatment system. A conservation easement with the Natural Lands Trust protects 159 acres of privately-owned land at the site. The land includes deciduous woodlands and a trout-breeding stream.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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UGI Columbia Gas Plant 

The 1.5-acre UGI Columbia Gas Plant Superfund site is located in a light industrial and residential area 400 feet northeast of the Susquehanna River in southern Pennsylvania. From 1851 to 1949, Columbia Gas used the site for gas manufacturing. In 1932, ownership of the property was transferred to Pennsylvania Power and Light (PP&L) and subsequently transferred to Lancaster County Gas Company in 1949. Lancaster County Gas merged with UGI Corporation, which owned the site until 1979. The property was used as a boat dealership from 1979 until 1994, when it was repurchased by PP&L. During the years of active gas manufacturing operations at the site, overflows from an on-site tar separator were directed to an open ditch that led to the Susquehanna River. Local fishermen complained that their boats were being covered with tar. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Columbia Borough purchased the former gas plant property and is reusing the property for the Borough’s vehicle maintenance garage and road salt storage facility. The Lancaster Water Authority operates a surface water pumping station at the site that withdraws water from the Susquehanna River for the city of Lancaster water supply. An active rail line owned by Pennsylvania Lines, LLC runs across the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 7 people. For additional information click here.

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Valmont TCE Site (Former Valmont Industrial Park)

The Valmont TCE Superfund site (former Valmont Industrial Park site) is located in West Hazleton, Pennsylvania. The site consists of the former Chromatex plant in the Valmont Industrial Park. It also includes an area of groundwater contamination that extends from the plant. From 1978 to 2001, Chromatex manufactured and coated upholstery fabric at the site. In 1987, EPA identified contamination in groundwater at the site and in several nearby residential wells. EPA connected residents to the municipal water supply. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001. In 2004, EPA removed contaminated soil and disposed of it at an off-site facility. In 2006 and 2007, EPA installed systems to address vapor intrusion in nearby residences. These systems continue to operate. In 2007, EPA constructed a soil vapor extraction and treatment system inside the former Chromatex plant to address contaminated soils beneath the foundation. The system ran until 2009. Cleanup also includes groundwater treatment and monitoring and land use restrictions. The site remains in continued use – a warehouse storage facility is located on site. In 2016, the firm using the facility purchased the site property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 10 people and generated an estimated $1,700,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Voortman Farm

The 43-acre Voortman Farm Superfund site is located in Upper Saucon Township, Pennsylvania. The site included a large contaminated sinkhole, where parties disposed of battery casings. This disposal resulted in heavy metal contamination of sinkhole soils. In 1982, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1986, a fire in the sinkhole might have contributed to airborne lead contamination. After the fire, EPA removed wastes and contaminated soil from the sinkhole and disposed of it off site. This eliminated the source of contamination at the site. After cleanup, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1989. The site is now in agricultural use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wade (ABM) Capped Site Reuse

Wade (ABM)Wade (ABM)The 3-acre Wade (ABM) Superfund site is located along the Delaware River in Chester, Pennsylvania. From 1950 until the early 1970s, a rubber recycling facility operated on site. Illegal industrial waste storage and disposal also took place at the site until 1978. Parties stored wastes in drums or dumped wastes directly onto the ground or into trenches. Waste disposal activities and a fire in 1978 resulted in contamination of groundwater and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA removed liquid waste and contaminated soil and debris for off-site disposal. EPA capped and regraded the site, covering it with topsoil and seeding it to minimize erosion. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1989. In 2003, EPA and the Chester Parking Authority entered into a prospective purchaser agreement (PPA). The Chester Parking Authority purchased the site property and redeveloped it as a parking area with a fishing pier as part of the city’s Barry Bridge Park complex. Redevelopment activities included cap improvements, installation of a storm drainage system, and resurfacing areas for parking and green space. In 2008, the city demolished parts of the Barry Bridge Park complex to allow construction of Chester’s professional soccer stadium. The Talen Energy Stadium opened in June 2010. The city retained the on-site parking area and modified it to accommodate delivery truck access.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Walsh Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 7-acre Walsh Landfill Superfund site is located along a forested ridge in Chester and Lancaster counties in Pennsylvania. From 1963 to 1977, an unpermitted landfill operated on site, accepting industrial and hazardous waste and municipal trash. Waste disposal resulted in contaminated groundwater and residential well water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA removed drummed wastes from the site and connected affected residences to a municipal water supply. In 2006, a group of potentially responsible parties (PRP group) installed an evaporation/transpiration cover system over the site to reduce water infiltration through the landfill and further limit the potential for migration of contaminants into groundwater. The PRP group planted 4,100 deep-rooting hybrid poplar trees and shallow-rooting plants on top of the cover system. These plantings absorb rainwater and prevent potential cover damage from excess water collecting on top of the cover. Most of the site is in ecological reuse; trees planted on the cover are at least 20 feet tall. The PRP group continues to inspect the site and conducts routine groundwater monitoring.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Sharon Plant) Capped Site Reuse

Exterior of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. former Sharon PlantWestinghouse Electric Corp. (Sharon Plant)The 58-acre Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Sharon Plant) Superfund site is located in Sharon, Pennsylvania. From 1922 to 1985, Westinghouse Electric manufactured electrical transformers at the site. Spills during plant operations contaminated soil, groundwater and sediment in the nearby Shenango River. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties completed cleanup activities for soil, groundwater and sediment. Monitoring is ongoing. Industrial uses are currently located at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 162 people and generated an estimated $37,243,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Westinghouse Elevator Plant

The Westinghouse Elevator Company Plant Superfund site is located in Cumberland Township, Pennsylvania. The Westinghouse Elevator Company manufactured elevators and moving stairways at the site beginning in 1968. Schindler Elevator Corporation took over the manufacturing plant in 1989 and continued manufacturing until 2013. Releases during manufacturing operations and waste material storage contaminated groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible party installed on- and off-plant groundwater extraction and treatment systems to clean up and prevent the spread of groundwater contamination. In 2005, due to declining contaminant concentrations in the groundwater, the responsible party stopped operating the off-plant treatment system. The on-plant treatment system continues to operate and is being optimized. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In 2015, the plant property was purchased. The former manufacturing building now has two tenants that are using the space for warehousing. The off-plant treatment system has been dismantled and the treatment system building is now being used by Adams County.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Westline

The 40-acre Westline Superfund site is located in McKean County, Pennsylvania. For almost 40 years, the Westline Inn on site has served as a destination for tourists visiting the nearby Allegheny National Forest. From 1901 to 1952, the Day Chemical Company operated on site. The firm converted lumber into charcoal, methanol and acetic acid. The Westline Inn began operating in an old house on site in 1975. In the early 1980s, EPA discovered toxic tar deposits from the former operations in soil and groundwater. EPA removed the exposed tar and placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included removal of several additional tar deposits and groundwater monitoring. After cleanup finished, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1992. The Westline Inn continued to operate during cleanup and remains a popular McKean County attraction.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 22 people and generated an estimated $610,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Whitmoyer Laboratories Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Spectators watch a soccer game at the new fields on the Whitmoyer Laboratories siteWhitmoyer LaboratoriesThe 22-acre Whitmoyer Laboratories Superfund site is located in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. For 50 years, a veterinary and pharmaceutical manufacturing plant operated on site. Operators disposed of arsenic compounds in unlined lagoons. These practices contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup began in 1993. Cleanup included groundwater treatment and removal of on-site buildings, contaminated soil and hazardous waste. In 2004, EPA entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with Jackson Township to help speed the Township’s acquisition of the site property for recreational use. Jackson Recreational Park opened in 2005. The park includes baseball and soccer fields as well as a scenic walking trail surrounded by vegetation. The trail connects the community with other local and regional natural resources such as Tulpehocken Creek and the historic Union Canal.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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York County Solid Waste and Refuse Authority Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

The 135-acre York County Solid Waste and Refuse Authority Landfill Superfund site is located in Hopewell Township, Pennsylvania. From 1974 to 1985, the York County Solid Waste Authority (YCSWA) operated a permitted landfill on site. The dumping of wastes into unlined pits contaminated groundwater. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) discovered the contamination in 1982. PADEP ordered YCSWA to stop operations in 1985. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. YCSWA led the cleanup. Activities included groundwater treatment and use of carbon filtration systems in affected homes. Monitoring of the landfill’s gas ventilation system and groundwater wells, groundwater treatment, and landfill cap maintenance are ongoing. YCSWA also established legal controls to prohibit new wells and activities that could disturb the landfill cap. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. Today, Hopewell Township and YCSWA reuse portions of the site for recreational and ecological purposes as well as alternative energy generation. Part of the site is included in the 200-acre Hopewell Area Recreation Complex. Trails, playgrounds, athletic fields, picnic pavilions, wildlife habitat and two wildlife viewing areas are located there. The wildlife habitat attracts over 122 different species of birds, including raptors, woodpeckers and doves. In 2014, YCSWA and York County Solar Partners launched a 2-acre solar array on another part of the site to generate power for the site’s groundwater treatment systems and office buildings. The solar facility generates 300,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 4 people. For additional information click here.

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