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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Virginia

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Abex Corp. Capped Site Reuse Healthcare Reuse

Commercial development at the siteAbex Corp.The Abex Corp. Superfund site is in Portsmouth, Virginia. A brass and bronze foundry operated on the site for 50 years. The foundry recycled used railroad journal bearings and recast the metal to make new bearings. The disposal of foundry waste sands and emissions from the smelting furnaces contaminated on-site soil, surrounding residential yards, a small playground and a rehabilitation center. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Under EPA oversight, the potentially responsible party cleaned up 3 acres of the site. Cleanup activities included demolishing foundry buildings, removing contaminated soil and restricting land use. Cleanup and investigation activities continue at other areas on site. Successful cleanup enabled reuse of the cleaned up area for public service, commercial, industrial and recreational land uses. In 2001, the local community opened a fire department headquarters and training facility at the site. The City of Portsmouth’s redevelopment of the site included a beverage distribution center, a shopping center and the not-for-profit Portsmouth Community Health Center.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 137 people and generated an estimated $18,800,430 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Arrowhead Associates, Inc./Scoville Corp.

The 30-acre Arrowhead Associates/Scovill Corp. Superfund site is located in a rural area of Westmoreland County, Virginia. From 1966 to 1979, Scovill Corp. and later Arrowhead, Inc. of Delaware electroplated cosmetic cases at the site. After plating stopped, the company abandoned machinery and process materials. Beginning in the early 1980s, Mattatuck Manufacturing made automobile wire harnesses on part of the site until 2005. A.R. Winarick used another part of the site to fill cosmetic cases until the mid-1990s. Under permit, site operators discharged treated electroplating wastes to the nearby stream, the Scates Branch. Testing found a groundwater plume under the site, which extends off site and into the Scates Branch and the South Fork Scates Branch. Studies also showed contamination in the former disposal ponds. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included groundwater treatment with a reactive barrier wall, an impermeable surface cap and a soil vapor extraction system. Testing of groundwater, surface water, sediments, indoor air and subsurface soil is ongoing. The O’Gara Group bought the Mattatuck Manufacturing plant and uses it as part of its tactical training facility. The O’Gara Group also makes barricades for its nearby training race track on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 40 people and generated an estimated $16,949,333 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc. Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc.Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc.The Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc. Superfund site is located in Portsmouth, Virginia. The site consists of 50 acres of industrialized waterfront area and part of the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. Wood-treating operations and activities by the U.S. Navy contaminated soil, sediments and groundwater with creosote and heavy metals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Several cleanup projects took place in the 1990s and 2000s. A $98 million cleanup is currently underway that includes river dredging, soil treatment, and ground water controls. After Atlantic Wood Industries stopped treating wood on site in the early 1990s, it started a pre-cast concrete manufacturing business on site. The business continues to operate while the site is being cleaned up. About the time the cleanup started, South Norfolk Jordan Bridge (SNJB), LLC purchased part of the site to construct a private toll bridge across the site and the river. SNJB implemented part of the cleanup on its land. SNJB completed the mile-long, 169-foot-high concrete bridge in 2012, replacing a dilapidated bridge that was no longer functional at no cost to taxpayers. Atlantic Wood Industries pre-cast the bridge segments at the site. PER Properties purchased an adjacent property, which includes part of the site, and is building a grain export facility and a concrete mix plant.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 27 people and generated an estimated $80,608,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Avtex Fibers, Inc. Alternative Energy Reuse Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Avtex Fibers, Inc.Avtex Fibers, Inc.The Avtex Fibers, Inc. Superfund site is located in Front Royal, Virginia. A rayon and other synthetic material manufacturing facility operated on the 440-acre site from 1940 to 1989. Improper waste disposal practices caused contamination of groundwater, water wells and the Shenandoah River. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The potentially responsible party cleaned up the site. Cleanup included building demolition, demolition debris removal, sewer excavation, landfill/waste basin capping and contaminated soil removal. Groundwater and leachate cleanup is ongoing at a new treatment plant. During cleanup, the community worked on site reuse plans. EPA advised site stakeholders, including the Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority (EDA), the United States Soccer Foundation and FMC Corporation. Today, the site hosts a 240-acre ecological conservancy park along the Shenandoah River. It is also home to the Royal Phoenix Business Park, a 162-acre commercial and industrial facility. Site stakeholders worked together to build soccer fields (the Skyline Soccerplex), a skate park and a picnic pavilion with a playground. The EDA restored an on-site administration building for its offices and other tenants, including the Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Planning Commission. Fully returning the site to reuse requires ongoing collaboration. EPA and the EDA worked together in 2014 to update land use agreements. The new agreements allow for mixed use of site property, which will support future redevelopment efforts. In September 2014, EPA Region 3 presented FMC Corporation, Warren County and the EDA with its Excellence in Site Reuse award for enabling the area’s productive reuse. EPA continues to support ongoing redevelopment at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 262 people and generated an estimated $7,480,190 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Chisman Creek Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

The Chisman Creek Park sign and baseball field in the backgroundChisman CreekThe Chisman Creek Superfund site is located in York County, Virginia. The 27-acre area consists of four former sand and gravel pits. From 1957 to 1974, Yorktown Power Generating Station used the abandoned sand and gravel pits to dispose of fly ash, a byproduct from the burning of fossil fuels. Testing found heavy metal contamination in groundwater and nearby Chisman Creek. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, Virginia Power, the potentially responsible party (PRP), conducted cleanup activities. Cleanup included connecting nearby residents to the public water supply and placing a cap and soil cover over two areas of the site. It also included groundwater collection, modification of surface water drainage pathways and surface water monitoring. The cleanup also became part of a larger water quality improvement effort that led to the reopening of the Chisman Creek estuary for fishing. After cleanup, the PRP worked with EPA, the State, local officials and the community on plans for a recreation complex at the site. The facility opened in 1991. It includes baseball and soccer fields.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Culpeper Wood Preservers, Inc.

The 20-acre Culpeper Wood Preservers, Inc. Superfund site is an active wood treatment facility in Culpeper County, Virginia. Site activities and disposal practices resulted in the contamination of soil, groundwater and surface water. In 1981, Culpeper Wood Preservers, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), removed contaminated soil and controlled contaminated runoff. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA and the PRP are conducting studies to determine the extent of contamination. The PRP supplies 10 properties with bottled water. EPA is working to finalize cleanup activities for the site. Culpeper Wood Preservers continues to operate its facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 70 people and generated an estimated $33,537,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Dixie Caverns County Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Dixie Caverns County LandfillDixie Caverns County LandfillThe 39-acre Dixie Caverns County Landfill Superfund site is located in Salem, Virginia. Roanoke County operated the unlicensed municipal landfill from 1965 to 1976. The landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. Facility operations contaminated soil and sediment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included removal and treatment of fly ash and the removal, treatment and disposal of contaminated stream sediments. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001. In January 2013, the potentially responsible party put land use controls in place to make sure the landfill will not be disturbed. The Roanoke County Police Department has built several buildings on site, including a training facility with classrooms and an outdoor shooting range.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 975-acre Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot Superfund site is located in Suffolk, Virginia. Starting in 1917, the U.S. Department of Defense used the area for munitions storage, shipment, classification, reconditioning, loading and destruction. The facility handled up to 1,300 tons of ammunition daily. At the end of World War II, the Department of Defense used the Depot for demobilization, including the destruction of unserviceable explosives, ammunition and chemicals. The Depot closed in the early 1960s. After a site inspection identified hazardous substances on site, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. EPA identified extensive contamination in disposal pits, fill and demolition areas, holding tanks, trenches, and off-shore dumping areas. Cleanup included the removal of munitions, explosives, contaminated debris, military items and contaminated soil. Due to groundwater contamination, the City of Suffolk extended municipal water lines to the Tidewater Community College campus. Several organizations and companies received portions of the former military facility. Of the 207 acres deeded to Dominion Power, 135 acres are now home to Bridgeway Commerce Park. The City of Suffolk plans to acquire another part of the site for the Hampton Roads Technology Park. This 158-acre facility will feature office, research and development space, a workforce development center, hotels and conference space, a restaurant, and a day-care facility. The Virginia Department of Community Colleges owns the remainder of the site property; the closed and unused Tidewater Community College campus is located on this part of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 24 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 537 people and generated an estimated $246,501,120 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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H & H Inc., Burn Pit

The H & H Inc., Burn Pit Superfund site is located in Hanover County, about 12 miles northwest of Richmond, Virginia. Between 1960 and 1976, Haskell Chemical Company used the 1-acre area to dispose of solvents from printing ink and printing press cleaning operations. Site operators used two shallow unlined pits to burn the wastes. Investigations identified contamination in soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) completed cleanup of contaminated soil in the former pit area in 1998 and cleanup of downgradient sediment in 1999. A groundwater and soil vapor pumping and treatment system operated at the site from 2000 until 2011. EPA and the PRPs are currently evaluating potential treatment technologies to clean up remaining groundwater contamination. The site owners operate a timber lot at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds Capped Site Reuse

Saltville Waste Disposal PondsSaltville Waste Disposal PondsThe Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds Superfund site is located on the border of Smyth and Washington Counties along the North Fork of the Holston River in Virginia. The site covers 125 acres. It includes two large former waste disposal ponds and the former location of a chlorine manufacturing plant. Site investigations in the 1970s identified high mercury levels in site soil, groundwater and sediments of the North Fork of the Holston River as far as 80 miles downstream of the site. The two waste disposal ponds on site contained mercury and alkaline waste material. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities. Initial cleanup included dredging mercury-contaminated sediments from the river, diverting clean surface water around the disposal ponds, and installing and operating a water treatment system. In 2003, the PRP installed a RCRA cap over one disposal pond, a soil cover over another, and planted grasses, shrubs and trees over the cover to support a wildlife habitat area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Saunders Supply Co.

The 7-acre Saunders Supply Co. Superfund site is in Suffolk County, Virginia. A wood-treating plant operated on site until 1991. Improper use, treatment and disposal of wood-treating chemicals resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater on site and off site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included disposal of contaminated material, soil incineration, groundwater monitoring and placement of use restrictions on the site property. Later, EPA included groundwater treatment to protect Godwins Millpond, a source of drinking water for the City of Suffolk. The Saunders Supply Company’s lumberyard continued to operate during the cleanup, which finished in 1999. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Saunders Supply Company continues to operate a wholesale lumberyard on site. The company also owns and operates a hardware store just south of the site. Contamination also impacted an adjacent nursery.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $4,130,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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U.S. Titanium Capped Site Reuse

Piney River Trail Head and parking lotU.S. TitaniumThe U.S Titanium Superfund site is located on the north side of Piney River in Nelson County, Virginia. The site includes 50 acres of a 175-acre titanium dioxide manufacturing plant that operated from 1931 to 1971. Byproducts of titanium dioxide manufacturing and heavy metals contaminated soil, surface water and groundwater. There were six major fish kills in the Piney and Tye Rivers between 1977 and 1981. Acidic groundwater seeps and acidic stormwater runoff from on-site waste piles and ponds contributed to these fish kills. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) removed and treated contaminated soil and placed it in a containment cell. The PRP also treated acidic stream beds and adjacent soil and built a groundwater treatment plant on site. Cleanup also included earthwork to reduce contamination resulting from rainwater flowing across the site. After cleanup, a group of citizens in Amherst and Nelson Counties worked with local governments to obtain Rails-to-Trails grant funding. They converted the former Blue Ridge Railroad right-of-way on site into a hiking path and public recreation resource.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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