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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Ohio

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Allied Chemical & Ironton Coke Capped Site Reuse

The 129-acre Allied Chemical & Ironton Coke Superfund site is located next to the Ohio River and Ice Creek in Ironton, Ohio. A coke plant operated on site from 1917 until 1982. The site includes the coke plant and five lagoons, a tar plant, portions of Ice Creek, and a pit used for disposal of tar plant waste and foundry sand. Site operations contaminated groundwater, soil and sediment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) led cleanup activities. The remedy included an underground barrier to contain contaminated groundwater, groundwater treatment, removal and treatment of contaminated soil, a protective sediment cap, and a solid waste soil cover. In 2014, the PRP completed Ohio River cleanup work. The tar plant remedy finished in 2015. The PRP continues to monitor restored wetlands in the former lagoon area on site. The PRP prepared a 37-acre area not requiring further cleanup for industrial reuse. The PRP transferred this area to the City of Ironton in 2002. The City then conveyed part of the area to the State of Ohio’s Department of Transportation (ODOT). ODOT constructed a county garage for highway maintenance activities and office space. Several industrial businesses are also active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 20 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 538 people and generated an estimated $277,830,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Behr Dayton Thermal System VOC Plume

The Behr Dayton Thermal System VOC Plume Superfund site is located in Dayton, Ohio. Since 1936, operators have made vehicle air conditioning and engine cooling systems on site. Facility operations resulted in the contamination of groundwater beneath the site with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) – VOCs easily become vapors or gases. In 2006, Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA identified high levels of contaminated vapors in soils and homes above the groundwater plume. As a result, EPA has overseen the installation of vapor mitigation systems in over 250 residences. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. An interim action is expected to address groundwater with highest VOC contamination in 2017, with a final remedy expected to be selected in 2018. The site includes residential, commercial and industrial areas.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,914 people and generated an estimated $322,087,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Bowers Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Restored wetlands at the siteBowers LandfillThe 12-acre Bowers Landfill Superfund site is located in Circleville, Ohio. In 1958, a gravel quarry operated on site; the area later became a residential landfill. After 1968, unauthorized dumping of chemical and industrial wastes, appliances, and used tires took place at the site. The dumping resulted in contamination of groundwater and the nearby Scioto River. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked closely with Ohio EPA and the site potentially responsible parties on a cleanup that converted much of the site into wetlands. Cleanup activities included removal of contaminated waste, landfill capping and venting, and revegetating the landfill surface. After cleanup, EPA put land use restrictions in place and took the site off the NPL in 1997. The 7-acre wetland area in the Scioto River floodplain has helped protect the landfill cap by absorbing excess waters and slowly releasing them into the environment. The creation of wetlands along the Scioto River has also transformed the area into a haven for plants, birds, fish and animals. A local hunting group purchased the site in 2014 and uses the site for various recreational uses including hunting, fishing, canoeing and wildlife photography.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Dover Chemical Corp.

The 60-acre Dover Chemical Corp. Superfund site is located in Dover, Ohio. Since 1950, Dover Chemical has operated a manufacturing facility at the site. The facility produces components used to make lubricants, plasticizers and flame retardants for vinyl products. From the 1950s until the early 1970s, improper chemical storage, spills and leaks at the site contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA proposed listing the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1993. Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil as well as on-site groundwater containment and treatment, which is ongoing. In September 2015, EPA selected a remedy to address the off-site groundwater plume. It includes in-place chemical oxidation injections in a grid near the origin of the off-site plume, plus injections of aerobic amendment along the center line of the plume, followed by monitored natural attenuation. Manufacturing operations remain active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 180 people and generated an estimated $103,734,006 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Fields Brook

The Fields Brook Superfund site is a 6-square-mile watershed in Ashtabula, Ohio. Since 1940, about 19 different facilities have operated in the Fields Brook watershed. Facility operations range from metal fabrication to chemical production. Facility operations resulted in the contamination of soil, sediment and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated sediment and floodplain soil from Fields Brook. Contaminated oil, sediment and waste from the original cleanup was treated or contained in on-site landfills. Ongoing cleanup activities include groundwater and free product extraction and land use restrictions. Industrial operations remain active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 101 people and generated an estimated $21,342,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ford Road Industrial Landfill

The Ford Road Landfill Superfund site is located in Elyria, Ohio. The area was originally a ravine; a landfill operated on site from the early 1900s to the 1970s. It accepted municipal and various industrial wastes in drums and in bulk. The Lorain County Metropolitan Parks District is the current site owner. Following cleanup, the site is now part of a greenway along the Black River.
Last updated October 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Industrial Excess Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Industrial Excess LandfillIndustrial Excess LandfillThe 30-acre Industrial Excess Landfill Superfund site is located in Stark County, Ohio. Prior to 1966, sand and gravel mining operations took place at the site. From 1966 until 1980, the mining and excavation pits served as a landfill. The landfill received industrial wastes from nearby rubber industries, hospital wastes, septic tank wastes from cleaning firms and general municipal wastes. In 1984, site investigations identified contamination in groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. To contain landfill contamination, cleanup included construction of a methane gas venting system and a vegetative cover over the landfill. Air strippers were installed to remove contaminants from residential drinking water wells and 100 residences were connected to the public water supply. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In 2004, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) planted almost 8,500 trees and shrubs at the site as part of the vegetative cover. This provides a stable, protective soil covering and fosters development of a diverse wildlife population. The PRPs also removed invasive species and installed kestrel nest boxes, bluebird boxes and bat boxes. Site stakeholders have discussed opportunities for recreational reuse at the site in the future.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Miami County Incinerator Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 65-acre Miami County Incinerator Superfund site is located in Miami County, Ohio. In 1968, an incinerator and several landfills opened at the site to handle municipal and industrial wastes. In 1978, the landfills closed, and site facilities converted into a solid waste transfer station. Improper waste disposal practices contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater. Groundwater contamination threatened the area’s sole source aquifer. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) connected impacted residents to the public water supply between 1989 and 1990. The PRPs constructed an impermeable cap, a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system, and a groundwater extraction and treatment system. The SVE system operated until 2000. Groundwater extraction and treatment is ongoing. Miami County currently owns the site property. Several county facilities operate on site. In addition to the solid waste transfer station, the site is now home to the county sheriff's office and the county engineering offices.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 113 people. For additional information click here.

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South Dayton Dump & Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The 80-acre South Dayton Dump & Landfill Superfund site is a former industrial landfill in Moraine, Ohio. From 1941 to 1996, the landfill accepted drums, metal turnings, fly ash, and other industrial and burned combustible wastes. These activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater and soil. EPA proposed the site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. EPA is working with the potentially responsible parties (PRPs) on the site’s remedial investigation and cleanup plan. The PRPs are also continuing to address vapor intrusion in some on-site buildings. Commercial and industrial uses remain active on a 40-acre portion of the landfill. The Miami Conservancy District also owns a floodway on the southern part of the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 73 people and generated an estimated $11,284,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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South Point Plant Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Green Infrastructure Reuse

South Point PlantSouth Point PlantThe 610-acre South Point Plant Superfund site is located in South Point, Ohio. From the 1940s until the late 1990s, manufacturing facilities at the site produced explosives, industrial chemicals and fuels. Spills and waste handling practices contributed to the contamination of groundwater and soils. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included soil removal and groundwater treatment as well as land and groundwater use restrictions. Through collaboration with the Lawrence Economic Development Corporation (LEDC) and local governments, EPA supported the site’s redevelopment. LEDC used an EPA grant to evaluate ways to integrate potential reuse opportunities with cleanup considerations. After cleanup, The Point Business Park opened on site in 2001. In 2004, EPA issued the first Ready for Reuse Determination in the Midwest for the site. Today, The Point hosts 21 businesses. Future plans for The Point include additional tenants, expanded facilities and construction of an intermodal facility to serve as a road, rail and river transportation resource for the region. Portions of the site are also leased for agricultural use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 29 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 793 people and generated an estimated $331,205,673 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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TRW, Inc. (Minerva Plant)

The 135-acre TRW, Inc. (Minerva Plant) Superfund site is located in a rural area of Minerva, Ohio. TRW, Inc. operated a manufacturing plant that produced aircraft components on site until 1986, when the company sold the property to PCC Airfoils. Use of chemicals, waste handling and disposal practices resulted in contamination of soil, sediment and groundwater. Cleanup activities included removal of contaminated soil and sediment as well as groundwater treatment. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Additional groundwater investigation is currently taking place under the oversight of the Ohio EPA. Today, PCC Airfoils continues to own the site property and manufactures parts for the aerospace industry on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 214 people and generated an estimated $357,902,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Valley Pike VOCs

The Valley Pike Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) site is located in Riverside, Ohio. The Mullins Tire and Rubber Company began operations on site in 1942; the company’s name is now Mullins Rubber Products, Inc. (MRP). As part of the manufacturing process, MRP used VOCs to degrease metal parts. Facility operations led to VOC contamination in soil, groundwater and indoor air contamination. Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA sampled 400 residences for vapor intrusion; a total of 91 residences were found to exceed the Ohio Department of Health’s screening level. EPA has installed vapor abatement mitigation systems in 90 homes to date. The impacted area includes a neighborhood of about 500 homes. In January 2016, MRP agreed to conduct, further evaluate and mitigate residential vapor intrusion and conduct a source removal action. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2016. MRP continues to operate its facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 60 people and generated an estimated $1,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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