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Climate Change Adaptation Resource Center (ARC-X)

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Climate Change in Your Region

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Results Tailored to Your Interests

 
 
 
 
Selection Climate Change in Your Region Content Adaptation Strategies Case Studies Tools Training
Outdoor Air
Outdoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Ground Level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Particulate Matter
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Climate Change Implications to Particulate Matter (PM) Air Quality
Climate change may increase the levels of particulate matter which may increase public health risk. Worsening of wildfires and droughts may further exacerbate airborne particulate matter and may lead to public health risk.
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Climate change can increase particulate matter (PM) levels through increases in the frequency or intensity of wildfires. The following strategies represent voluntary outdoor air strategies that states and localities can pursue to help adapt to anticipated climate changes.
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Here is an example of how one community is adapting to the potential of worsening air quality under a changing climate. California is anticipating a future that may include more human exposure to particulate matter due to more frequent and intense wildfires.
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Outdoor Air + Ground Level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Outdoor Air + Particulate Matter
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Outdoor Air + Particulate Matter + Ground Level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM) and Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM) and Ground-level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM) and Ground-level Ozone
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM) and Ground-level Ozone
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Outdoor Air
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Ground Level Ozone
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Outdoor Air + Ground Level Ozone
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality: Ground-level Ozone
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Outdoor Air + Particulate Matter
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Outdoor Air + Particulate Matter + Ground Level Ozone
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air
Indoor Air Quality
Indoor Air Quality

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
 
Indoor Air + Particulate Matter
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Particulate Matter + Ground Level Ozone
Outdoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Indoor Air + Particulate Matter + Ground Level Ozone
Indoor Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality: Particulate Matter (PM)
Air Quality
Outdoor Air Quality
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.

Indoor Air Quality
No Case Study is currently available that illustrates adapting to Indoor Air climate risks.

Indoor Air Quality
  • Indoor airPlus – This program's construction practices and product specifications could minimize possible future exposure to indoor air pollutants and contaminants made worse by climate change.
Outdoor Air Quality
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for outdoor air. However, the following tools from other EPA programs are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change and outdoor air.
 
Drought
Water Utilities: Drought
Water Utilities: Drought
Water Utilities: Drought
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Water Utilities: Drought
We identified several EPA tools below based on your interests. However, there are additional EPA tools that Water Utility representatives might find helpful depending on one's circumstances. We recommend checking out the EPA's more exhaustive list of these tools: Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion

*Note: Sea Level Rise and Drought may also worsen saltwater intrusion. View these adaptation strategies as well to gain a broader look at what adaptation strategies can better prepare a utility for saltwater intrusion.

Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion
The case studies highlight communities that have undertaken actions to adapt to climate risks. In each case study, information is provided on "How They Did It" and tools to help you replicate their actions.
Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We identified several EPA tools below based on your interests. However, there are additional EPA tools that Water Utility representatives might find helpful depending on one's circumstances. We recommend checking out the EPA's more exhaustive list of these tools:
  • Water Utility Tools
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – The scenario-Based Projected Changes Map can provide easy access to projected scenarios from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool. These projections include scenarios for annual total precipitation and sea level rise for coastal locations, all of which may affect the level of saltwater intrusion into coastal areas.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise
Here are two examples of how water utilities are adapting to potential climate vulnerabilities from sea level rise. This section also contains a third case study detailing how several communities in South Florida collaborated to better identify vulnerabilities from sea level rise.
Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We identified several EPA tools below based on your interests. However, there are additional EPA tools that Water Utility representatives might find helpful depending on one's circumstances. We recommend checking out the EPA's more exhaustive list of these tools:
  • Water Utility Tools
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – The scenario-Based Projected Changes Map can provide easy access to projected scenarios from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool. These projections include scenarios for annual total precipitation and sea level rise for coastal locations, all of which may affect the level of saltwater intrusion into coastal areas.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding
Water Utilities: Storms
Water Utilities: Storms
Water Utilities: Storms
Here are three examples of how water utilities are adapting to potential climate vulnerabilities from storms.
Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – The scenario-Based Projected Changes Map can provide easy access to projected scenarios from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool. These projections include scenarios for annual total precipitation and sea level rise for coastal locations, all of which may affect the level of saltwater intrusion into coastal areas.
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Source Water Impacts
Note: Water Quality Adaptation Strategies provide additional adaptation strategies for water resource managers to help improve water quality and use green infrastructure to handle increased stormwater.
Water Utilities: Source Water Impacts
Here are three examples of how water utilities are adapting to potential climate change implications to source water quality.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • BASINS, Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources – BASINS is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed to help regional, state, and local agencies perform watershed- and water quality-based studies.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought and Saltwater Intrusion
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to drought and saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified their water sources in order to reduce groundwater withdrawals and vulnerability to droughts. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise would have on saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Drought and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Drought and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Drought and Sea Level Rise
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to drought and sea level rise.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding
Water Utilities: Drought and Storms
Water Utilities: Drought and Storms
Water Utilities: Drought and Storms
Here are two examples of how water utilities are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerability from droughts and storms. Southern Nevada Water Authority analyzed how source water availability may be affected by drought or increased incidence of harmful algal blooms. Fredericktown, Missouri assessed drought risk, as well as the risk associated with strong storms that increase sedimentation and contaminate levels within a drinking water reservoir.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought and Source Water Impacts
Here are two examples of how water utilities are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerability of water sources from drought. Southern Nevada Water Authority analyzed how source water availability may be affected by drought and increased incidence of harmful algal blooms. Fredericktown, Missouri assessed drought risk and potential risk from increased sedimentation and contaminate levels within a drinking water reservoir.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Saltwater Intrusion
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from drought, sea level rise and saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified water sources in order to reduce vulnerability to droughts and lessen groundwater withdrawals that worsen saltwater intrusion. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise would have on saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to drought, saltwater intrusion, and storms. Tampa Bay diversified their water sources in order to reduce vulnerability to droughts and lessen groundwater withdrawals. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk from storms while analyzing the risk from saltwater intrusion on the drinking water intake.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Source Water Impacts and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Source Water Impacts and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Drought, Source Water Impacts and Saltwater Intrusion
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerability of source waters from drought and saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified their water sources in order to reduce groundwater withdrawals and vulnerability to droughts. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise and saltwater intrusion would have on source waters.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Storms
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Storms
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Storms

Here are four examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and storms.

Drought:
Saltwater Intrusion:
Sea Level Rise:
Storms:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from sea level rise and saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified water sources in order to reduce groundwater withdrawals that worsen saltwater intrusion. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise would have on saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise + Source Water
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities of source water from sea level rise and saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified water sources in order to reduce groundwater withdrawals that worsen saltwater intrusion. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise would have on saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Saltwater Intrusion + Source Water
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities of source water from saltwater intrusion. Tampa Bay diversified water sources in order to reduce groundwater withdrawals that worsen saltwater intrusion. Anacortes rebuilt a water treatment facility to adapt to higher flood risk while analyzing the affect sea level rise would have on saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – A software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts

Here are four examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and storms.

Drought:
Saltwater Intrusion:
Sea Level Rise:
Source Water Impacts:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Storms and Source Water Impacts

Here are examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to each selected impact: drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise, storms and source water impacts.

Drought:
Saltwater Intrusion:
Storms:
Source Water Impacts:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts

Here are examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to each selected impact: drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise, storms and source water impacts.

Drought:
Saltwater Intrusion:
Sea Level Rise:
Storms:
Source Water Impacts:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Sea-level Rise + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Storms
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Storms

View Adaptation Strategies for Drought to see specific strategies that have been identified for water utilities.

View Adaptation Strategies for Sea Level Rise to see specific strategies that have been identified for water utilities.

Or, visit Water Utility Adaptation Strategies Section to search by management objective or other climate impact.

Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Storms
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from drought, sea level rise and storms.
Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Sea-level Rise + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from drought, sea level rise and storms.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Sea-level Rise + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts

Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from drought, sea level rise and source water impacts.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Sea-level Rise + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from sea level rise and source water impacts.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Drought + Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Drought, Storms and Source Water Impacts
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from drought, storms and source water impacts.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Climate Change Handbook for Regional Water Planning – The Handbook provides a framework for considering climate change in water management planning. The handbook guides resource managers and planners with key decision considerations, resources, tools, and decision options to adapt to a changing climate, including to specific concerns over drought.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Water Utilities: Storms and Saltwater Intrusion
Here is one example of a water utility that is adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from storms and saltwater intrusion.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms and Sea Level Rise
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from storms and sea level rise.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms and Source Water Impacts
Here are three examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from storms impacting source water quality.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Sea Level Rise
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities from storms, saltwater intrusion and sea level rise.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Saltwater Intrusion + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion and Source Water Impacts
Here are two examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate risk of storms and saltwater intrusion adversely affecting source water quality.

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Saltwater Intrusion + Sea-level Rise + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts

Water Utilities: Storms, Saltwater Intrusion, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Here are examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to each selected impact: storms, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise, and source water impacts.

Storms:
Saltwater Intrusion:
Sea Level Rise:
Source Water Impacts:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Extreme Precipitation - Flooding + Sea-level Rise + Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts
Water Utilities: Storms, Sea Level Rise and Source Water Impacts

Here are examples of water utilities that are adapting to anticipated climate vulnerabilities related to each selected impact: storms, sea level rise, and source water impacts.

Storms:
Sea Level Rise:
Source Water Impacts:

To explore additional water utility case studies, view Water Utility Case Studies.

Water Utilities & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Utility Tools.
  • CREAT, Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool – This tool can assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities, including from drought, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and source water impacts.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Flood Resilience Checklist – The Flood Resilience Checklist is an assessment tool for communities to use to identify opportunities to improve their resilience to future floods through policy and regulatory tools.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Erosion and Sedimentation
Water Quality: Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Water Quality: Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Water Quality: Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Here are two examples of how water resource managers are adapting to maintain water quality even under changing climate conditions.

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

For a view at the projected changes (2035 and 2060) for your region and how they may impact stormwater runoff, such as the anticipated intensity of the 100 year storm, view:
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
To model erosion and sedimentation anticipated under future climate scenarios, view:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms
Here is an example of how water resource managers are adapting to reduce future occurrences of harmful algal blooms under changing climate conditions.

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

To model water quality changes and contributors to harmful algal bloom outbreaks, view:
  • Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS Tool) – HAWQS is a water quantity and quality modeling system to evaluate the impacts of management alternatives, pollution control scenarios and climate change scenarios on the quantity and quality of water at a national scale.
Also for more information on the affects of climate change on incidence of harmful algal blooms, view:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Stormwater Runoff
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff
Here are four examples of how water resource managers adapting to limit stormwater runoff and maintain water quality even as the climate changes.

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

To model climate risks to urban runoff from a municipal or community-level, view:
To model stormwater runoff and the benefits of green infrastructure from a property or small-scale level, view:
  • Stormwater Calculator with Climate Assessment Tool – Desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States. The calculator includes future climate vulnerability scenarios.
For a view at the projected changes (2035 and 2060) for your region and how they may impact stormwater runoff, such as the anticipated intensity of the 100 year storm, view:
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Erosion and Sedimentation + Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Water Quality: Harmful Algal Blooms and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Here are three examples of how water resource managers are adapting to limit the impacts of erosion and sedimentation on water quality even as the climate changes.

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

To model water quality changes and contributors to harmful algal bloom outbreaks, view:
  • Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS Tool) – HAWQS is a water quantity and quality modeling system to evaluate the impacts of management alternatives, pollution control scenarios and climate change scenarios on the quantity and quality of water at a national scale.
Also for more information on the affects of climate change on incidence of harmful algal blooms, view:
To model erosion and sedimentation anticipated under future climate scenarios, view:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Algal Blooms + Stormwater Runoff
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Harmful Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Harmful Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Harmful Algal Blooms
Here are three examples of how water resource managers are adapting to reduce stormwater runoff, limit harmful algal blooms and maintain water quality even as the climate changes.

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

For a view at the projected changes (2035 and 2060) for your region and how they may impact stormwater runoff, such as the anticipated intensity of the 100 year storm, view:
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
To model climate risks to urban runoff from a municipal or community-level, view:
To model water quality changes and contributors to harmful algal bloom outbreaks, view:
  • Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS Tool) – HAWQS is a water quantity and quality modeling system to evaluate the impacts of management alternatives, pollution control scenarios and climate change scenarios on the quantity and quality of water at a national scale.
Also for more information on climate changes, such as increased rainfall, and the affect that these changes have on stormwater runoff and incidence of harmful algal blooms, view:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Stormwater Runoff + Erosion and Sedimentation
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates

Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff and Erosion and Sedimentation Rates
Here are two examples each of how water resource managers are adapting to reduce stormwater runoff and limit erosion and sedimentation in order to maintain water quality even as the climate changes.

Stormwater:
Erosion and Sedimentation:

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

For a view at the projected changes (2035 and 2060) for your region and how they may impact stormwater runoff, such as the anticipated intensity of the 100 year storm, view:
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
To model climate risks to urban runoff from a municipal or community-level, view:
To model erosion and sedimentation anticipated under future climate scenarios, view:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Erosion and Sedimentation + Algal Blooms + Stormwater Runoff
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff, Erosion and Sedimentation Rates, and Harmful Algal Blooms
Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff, Erosion and Sedimentation Rates, and Harmful Algal Blooms

Water Quality: Stormwater Runoff, Erosion and Sedimentation Rates, and Harmful Algal Blooms
Here are three examples of how water resource managers are adapting to maintain water quality under changing climate conditions.

Stormwater:
Erosion and Sedimentation:
Harmful Algal Blooms:

Water Quality & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Water Quality Tools.

For a view at the projected changes (2035 and 2060) for your region and how they may impact stormwater runoff, such as the anticipated intensity of the 100 year storm, view:
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
To model climate risks to urban runoff from a municipal or community-level, view:
To model erosion and sedimentation anticipated under future climate scenarios, view:
To model water quality changes and contributors to harmful algal bloom outbreaks, view:
  • Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS Tool) – HAWQS is a water quantity and quality modeling system to evaluate the impacts of management alternatives, pollution control scenarios and climate change scenarios on the quantity and quality of water at a national scale.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Change in Fish Species
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species
Adaptation Strategies that can help fish species adapt to a changing climate include:
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species
Here is one example of how a community is adapting to reduce the vulnerability of fish species to climate change.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Other resources that may be of interest:
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Estuaries
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries
Adaptation Strategies for Estuaries include:
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries
Here are two examples of how communities and National Estuary Programs are adapting to reduce the vulnerability of estuaries to changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Other resources that may be of interest:
  • Rolling Easements Primer – This document provides a primer on more than a dozen land use and legal tools for ensuring that intertidal habitats (wetlands, mudflats, and beaches). Rolling easements help ensure that these habitats can persist even as sea level rises.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Wetland Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Wetlands Protection
Here are three examples of how communities are adapting to prepare wetlands for changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Other resources that may be of interest:
  • Rolling Easements Primer – This document provides a primer on more than a dozen land use and legal tools for ensuring that intertidal habitats (wetlands, mudflats, and beaches). Rolling easements help ensure that these habitats can persist even as sea level rises.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Change in Fish Species + Estuaries
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Estuaries
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Estuaries
Adaptation Strategies for Estuaries include:

Adaptation Strategies that can help fish species adapt to a changing climate

Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Estuaries
Here are two examples of how communities are adapting to better prepare fish species and estuaries for changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Change in Fish Species + Wetland Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species and Wetlands Protection
Here are three examples of how communities are adapting to better prepare fish species and wetlands for changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • BASINS, Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources – BASINS is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed to help regional, state, and local agencies perform watershed- and water quality-based studies.
  • Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPPCAT) Model – An online tool for assessing and managing the potential impacts of climate change on sediment loading to streams using the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model.
Other resources that may be of interest:
  • Rolling Easements Primer – This document provides a primer on more than a dozen land use and legal tools for ensuring that intertidal habitats (wetlands, mudflats, and beaches). Rolling easements help ensure that these habitats can persist even as sea level rises.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Change in Fish Species + Estuaries + Wetland Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species, Estuaries, and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species, Estuaries, and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Change in Fish Species, Estuaries, and Wetlands Protection
Here are two examples of how communities are adapting to better prepare estuaries, fish species and wetlands for changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Other resources that may be of interest:
  • Rolling Easements Primer – This document provides a primer on more than a dozen land use and legal tools for ensuring that intertidal habitats (wetlands, mudflats, and beaches). Rolling easements help ensure that these habitats can persist even as sea level rises.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Estuaries + Wetland Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries and Wetlands Protection
Ecosystem Protection: Estuaries and Wetlands Protection
Here are two examples of how communities and National Estuary Programs are adapting to better prepare estuaries and wetlands for changing climate conditions.

To explore additional case studies, view Ecosystem Protection Case Studies.

Ecosystem Protection & Climate Adaptation
We have identified several tools that may be of interest to you based on your selection. The direct link to these tools are provided below. However, to explore all tools that may be relevant to this selection view Ecosystem Protection Tools.
  • Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans – The workbook provides guidance for conducting risk-based climate change vulnerability assessments and developing adaptation action plans.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This mapping tool illustrates current worst-case coastal storm surge or inundation scenarios and hurricane strike frequency derived from Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 100 and 500 year flood plains from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Other resources that may be of interest:
  • Rolling Easements Primer – This document provides a primer on more than a dozen land use and legal tools for ensuring that intertidal habitats (wetlands, mudflats, and beaches). Rolling easements help ensure that these habitats can persist even as sea level rises.
Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources Training – Discusses the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers face.
Contaminated Site Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management
Below are two climate change adaptation cases to illustrate adaptation-in-action at waste management and contaminated land sites. The first case, American Cyanamid, illustrates adaptation actions to make a waste site more resilient to future storms. The second case, Barre City, discusses how a community is including future climatic considerations in its redevelopment efforts.
  • Case Study – American Cyanamid: See how American Cyanamid Superfund Site responded to disaster by rebuilding facilities to account for expected climate changes.
  • Case Study – Barre City: See how a brownfield site redevelopment project in Barre City, Vermont used the Analysis of Brownfield Cleanup Alternatives Checklist to better understand climate vulnerability.

To explore additional examples of climate adaptation, view Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation

Waste Management and Emergency Response & Climate Adaptation
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for waste management activities. However, the following tools are recommended to help account for potential climate change impacts at contaminated waste sites.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This tool maps current worst-case storm surge, inundation scenarios, and hurricane strike frequency. Based on Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes models (NOAA/SLOSH), and 100- and 500-year flood plains (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Stormwater Calculator with Climate Assessment Tool – Desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States. The calculator includes future climate vulnerability scenarios.
  • Watershed Index Online – The Wetness Index is a computer model of where in the landscape water is expected to pool after a rain event. The tool indicates potential flooding areas other than FEMA 100 year flood plains.
  • Integrated Climate and Land-Use Scenarios (ICLUS) – The ICLUS project provides future scenarios consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development. These can be used to inform projections of future climate.
Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Climate Change Adaptation Training
Disaster Debris Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Disaster Debris Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Disaster Debris Management
With climate change, the frequency and intensity of storms are expected to increase in many areas. Large amounts of disaster debris is typically generated during such storms. Planning has been identified as an adaptation strategy.
Waste and Emergency Management: Disaster Debris Management
Waste and Emergency Management: Disaster Debris Management
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for disaster debris management activities. However, the following tools are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential of more frequent and intense storms.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This tool maps current worst-case storm surge, inundation scenarios, and hurricane strike frequency. Based on Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes models (NOAA/SLOSH), and 100- and 500-year flood plains (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Stormwater Calculator with Climate Assessment Tool – Desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States. The calculator includes future climate vulnerability scenarios.
  • Watershed Index Online – The Wetness Index is a computer model of where in the landscape water is expected to pool after a rain event. The tool indicates potential flooding areas other than FEMA 100 year flood plains.
  • Integrated Climate and Land-Use Scenarios (ICLUS) – The ICLUS project provides future scenarios consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development. These can be used to inform projections of future climate.
Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Climate Change Adaptation Training
Contaminated Site Management + Disaster Debris Management
Waste Management and Emergency Response
Climate change can threaten the proper management of wastes and complicate the safe management of disaster debris. Potential vulnerabilities include damage to waste management facilities, accidental chemical releases, and the challenges associated with managing more disaster debris more frequently.
Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management and Disaster Debris Management

Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management and Disaster Debris Management

Adaptation Strategies for Contaminated Site Management:
Adaptation Strategies for Disaster Debris Management:
Waste and Emergency Management: Contaminated Site Management and Disaster Debris Management
Below are two climate change adaptation cases to illustrate adaptation-in-action at waste management and contaminated land sites. The first case, American Cyanamid, illustrates adaptation actions to make a waste site more resilient to future storms. The second case, Barre City, discusses how a community is including future climatic considerations in its redevelopment efforts.
  • Case Study – American Cyanamid: See how American Cyanamid Superfund Site responded to disaster by rebuilding facilities to account for expected climate changes.
  • Case Study – Barre City: See how a brownfield site redevelopment project in Barre City, Vermont used the Analysis of Brownfield Cleanup Alternatives Checklist to better understand climate vulnerability.

To explore additional examples of climate adaptation, view Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation

Waste and Emergency Management & Climate Adaptation
EPA does not have climate change adaptation tools specifically developed for waste management sites or disaster debris management activities. However, the following tools are recommended to help communities prepare for the potential impacts of climate change.
  • Storm Surge Inundation and Hurricane Strike Frequency Map – This tool maps current worst-case storm surge, inundation scenarios, and hurricane strike frequency. Based on Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes models (NOAA/SLOSH), and 100- and 500-year flood plains (FEMA), and hurricane strike dataset from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
  • Stormwater Calculator with Climate Assessment Tool – Desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States. The calculator includes future climate vulnerability scenarios.
  • Watershed Index Online – The Wetness Index is a computer model of where in the landscape water is expected to pool after a rain event. The tool indicates potential flooding areas other than FEMA 100 year flood plains.
  • Integrated Climate and Land-Use Scenarios (ICLUS) – The ICLUS project provides future scenarios consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development. These can be used to inform projections of future climate.
Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Climate Change Adaptation Training
Air Quality Indoor & Outdoor
Public Health: Air Quality
Public Health: Air Quality
Public Health: Air Quality
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect environmental related public health stressors. Below are several examples of climate change adaptation related to air quality and public health.
  • Salt Lake City, Utah Adapts to Improve Air Quality Through Smart Growth – See how Salt Lake City has been recognized for increasing climate resilience and adaptation. The city's sustainability plan set goals to improve air quality, protect community health, and reduce particulate matter (PM) and ozone pollution (which can worsen respiratory illnesses and are both projected to be exacerbated by climate change).
  • California Prepares for Increased Wildfire Risk to Air Quality From Climate Change – See how California is anticipating how climate change will affect wildfires and associated public health concerns and adapting by protecting forests, increasing public awareness of proper land management.
  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of air pollution and extreme heat events.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Water Quality
Public Health: Water Quality & Chemical Exposure from Flooding
Public Health: Water Quality & Chemical Exposure from Flooding
Public Health: Water Quality & Chemical Exposure from Flooding
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect environmental related public health stressors. Below are several examples of climate change adaptation related to air quality and public health. The two examples illustrate how public health agencies can incorporated climate adaptation planning into their activities.
  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of water quality and water-borne diseases.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Extreme Heat
Public Health: Extreme Heat
Public Health: Extreme Heat
Public Health: Extreme Heat
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect enviromental related public health stressors. Several examples of communities adapting to the threat of more frequent extreme heat events are provided below.
  • Chicago, IL Adapts to Improve Extreme Heat Preparedness – See how Chicago has adopted a comprehensive set of actions to reduce deaths from extreme heat events. Chicago actively engaged the local community and targeted vulnerability neighborhoods to help identify how residents could reduce the impact of climate exacerbated extreme heat events.
  • New York City Assesses Extreme Heat Climate Risk – See how New York City, recognizing the current and future extreme heat risk to its population, decided to assess its climate risk and vulnerability.
  • New York City Adapts To Deal with Projected Increase of Heat Waves – New York City has taken substantive actions to reduce its current vulnerability (i.e., increasing its resiliency to current conditions) as well as its future vulnerability (i.e., adapting to the projected future climatic conditions) associated with heat waves.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Air Quality Indoor & Outdoor + Water Quality
Public Health: Air Quality & Water Quality
Public Health: Air Quality & Water Quality
Public Health: Air Quality & Water Quality
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect enviromental related public health stressors. States and local communities are anticipating, preparing for, and adapting to public health concerns related to climate change. Below are several examples of adaptation activities related to possible air quality and extreme heat public health impacts.

Massachusetts and Minnesota have taken steps to better understand the climate change risks to public health, including air and water quality related impacts.

  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of air pollution and extreme heat events.
Here are two examples of adaptation efforts targeting air quality related risks.

View Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Air Quality Indoor & Outdoor + Extreme Heat
Public Health: Air Quality & Extreme Heat
Public Health: Air Quality & Extreme Heat

Public Health: Air Quality & Extreme Heat
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect enviromental related public health stressors. States and local communities are anticipating, preparing for, and adapting to public health concerns related to climate change. Below are several examples of ad a pat ion activities related to possible air quality and extreme heat public health impacts.

State-Level Public Health Planning:
  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of air pollution and extreme heat events.
Air Quality:
Extreme Heat:
  • Chicago, IL Adapts to Improve Extreme Heat Preparedness – See how Chicago has adopted a comprehensive set of actions to reduce deaths from extreme heat events. Chicago actively engaged the local community and targeted vulnerability neighborhoods to help identify how residents could reduce the impact of climate exacerbated extreme heat events.
  • New York City Assesses Extreme Heat Climate Risk – See how New York City, recognizing the current and future extreme heat risk to its population, decided to assess its climate risk and vulnerability.
  • New York City Adapts To Deal with Projected Increase of Heat Waves – See how New York City has taken substantive actions to reduce its current vulnerability (i.e., increasing its resiliency to current conditions) as well as its future vulnerability (i.e., adapting to the projected future climatic conditions) associated with heat waves.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Water Quality + Extreme Heat
Public Health: Water Quality & Extreme Heat
Public Health: Water Quality & Extreme Heat

Public Health: Water Quality & Extreme Heat
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect enviromental related public health stressors. States and local communities are anticipating, preparing for, and adapting to public health concerns related to climate change. Below are several examples of ad a pat ion activities related to possible water quality and extreme heat public health impacts.

Water Quality & Extreme Heat:
  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of air pollution and extreme heat events.
Extreme Heat:
  • Chicago, IL Adapts to Improve Extreme Heat Preparedness – See how Chicago has adopted a comprehensive set of actions to reduce deaths from extreme heat events. Chicago actively engaged the local community and targeted vulnerability neighborhoods to help identify how residents could reduce the impact of climate exacerbated extreme heat events.
  • New York City Assesses Extreme Heat Climate Risk – See how New York City, recognizing the current and future extreme heat risk to its population, decided to assess its climate risk and vulnerability.
  • New York City Adapts To Deal with Projected Increase of Heat Waves – See how New York City has taken substantive actions to reduce its current vulnerability (i.e., increasing its resiliency to current conditions) as well as its future vulnerability (i.e., adapting to the projected future climatic conditions) associated with heat waves.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Air Quality Indoor & Outdoor + Water Quality + Extreme Heat
Public Health: Air Quality, Water Quality & Extreme Heat
Public Health: Air Quality, Water Quality & Extreme Heat

Public Health: Air Quality, Water Quality & Extreme Heat
Climate change impacts including rising temperatures, storm pattern changes, more extreme weather events, and rising sea levels can affect environmental related public health stressors. Below are several public health examples of communities adapting to the threat of climate change.

State-Level Public Health Planning:
  • Massachusetts Surveys Climate Readiness of Public Health Departments – See how Massachusetts surveyed its local boards of public health to gauge the state's level of public health preparedness for climate change. The survey covered surveillance, planning, and intervention activities associated with heat stress, hazardous weather events, indoor air quality, food supply/agricultural issues, vector-borne diseases, and water quality issues.
  • Minnesota Assesses Climate Risk to Public Health – See how Minnesota's Strategic Adaptation Plan (2010) identifies public health threats from climate change and states the necessity of improving its public health system's capacity to respond to these threats, particularly for vulnerable populations. The plan includes consideration of air pollution and extreme heat events.
Air Quality:
Extreme Heat:
  • Chicago, IL Adapts to Improve Extreme Heat Preparedness – See how Chicago has adopted a comprehensive set of actions to reduce deaths from extreme heat events. Chicago actively engaged the local community and targeted vulnerability neighborhoods to help identify how residents could reduce the impact of climate exacerbated extreme heat events.
  • New York City Assesses Extreme Heat Climate Risk – See how New York City, recognizing the current and future extreme heat risk to its population, decided to assess its climate risk and vulnerability.
  • New York City Adapts To Deal with Projected Increase of Heat Waves – See how New York City has taken substantive actions to reduce its current vulnerability (i.e., increasing its resiliency to current conditions) as well as its future vulnerability (i.e., adapting to the projected future climatic conditions) associated with heat waves.

View the Case Studies for Climate Change Adaptation to explore additional examples of climate adaptation.

Public Health & Climate Adaptation
The following tools may be helpful to you as you anticipate, prepare for and adapt to the public health risks of climate change. The tools were not developed specifically to address public health climate change concerns. However, they present analytical tools or can help organize information that might help public health officials better understand, plan for, or target potential climate change vulnerabilities.
  • Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool – EJScreen is a mapping tool that allows users to create maps and generate detailed reports based on the geographic areas and data sets (e.g., demographics) they choose. The tool includes data related to multiple factors that may affect public and environmental health within a community or region. This tool may be helpful in analyzing subpopulations that may be more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change (e.g. living close to water utility facilities that may be damaged or overwhelmed during more frequent or intense storms).
  • Sustainable Communities Indicator Catalog – The Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health and the environment.
  • Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure Guide – The Green Infrastructure Guide helps communities plan and design green infrastructure for multiple environmental, health, social, and economic benefits.
  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map – This mapping tool provides easy to access scenarios of projected changes from EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool for annual total precipitation, annual average temperature, precipitation intensity for the 100-year storm, number of days per year with temperatures above 100 F, and sea level rise for coastal locations.
  • ICLUS, Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios – The ICLUS project is developing scenarios broadly consistent with global-scale, peer-reviewed storylines of population growth and economic development, which are used by climate change modelers to develop projections of future climate.
For additional tools and information related to climate change and public health, we recommend visiting the links:
 
Getting Started
Adaptation Planning: Getting Started
There is no "one-size fits all" approach for communities to anticipate, plan, and adapt.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great place to learn more and begin your adaptation planning efforts.
See a couple of alternative ways communities have organized their efforts.
Adaptation Planning: Getting Started
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning: Getting Started
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
 
Comprehensive
Adaptation Planning: Comprehensive Planning
A number of local governments have found planning and assessing vulnerability across the broad range of government services as an effective approach to anticipate, plan for, and adapt.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great resource to help your adaptation planning efforts.
Adaptation Planning: Comprehensive Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning: Comprehensive Planning
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
 
Sector-Based
Adaptation Planning: Sector-Based Planning
There is no "one-size fits all" approach for communities to anticipate, plan, and adapt to the changing climate.
A number of local governments have found focusing on a particular sector (e.g., Water Utility) as a practical way to make progress.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great resource to help your adaptation planning efforts.
Adaptation Planning: Sector-Based Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning: Sector-Based Planning
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
 
Getting Started + Comprehensive
Adaptation Planning
Getting Started
There is no "one-size fits all" approach for communities to anticipate, plan, and adapt.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great place to learn more and begin your adaptation planning efforts.
Comprehensive Planning
A number of local governments have found planning and assessing vulnerability across the broad range of government services as an effective approach to anticipate, plan for, and adapt.
Adaptation Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
 
Getting Started + Sector-Based
Adaptation Planning
Getting Started
There is no "one-size fits all" approach for communities to anticipate, plan, and adapt.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great place to learn more and begin your adaptation planning efforts.
Sector-Based Adaptation Planning
A number of local governments have found focusing on a particular sector (e.g., Water Utility) as a practical way to make progress.
Adaptation Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Sector Based:
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
 
Comprehensive + Sector-Based
Adaptation Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great place to learn more and begin your adaptation planning efforts.
Comprehensive Adaptation Planning
A number of local governments have found planning and assessing vulnerability across the broad range of government services as an effective approach to anticipate, plan for, and adapt.
Sector-Based Adaptation Planning
A number of local governments have found focusing on a particular sector (e.g., Water Utility) as a practical way to make progress.
Adaptation Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Sector Based:
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
  • Community-Based Adaptation to a Changing Climate – This handout describes the impacts of climate change on local government services, provides illustrative adaptation strategies, and includes examples of community-based adaptation actions.
 
Getting Started + Comprehensive + Sector-Based
Adaptation Planning
Getting Started
There is no "one-size fits all" approach for communities to anticipate, plan, and adapt.
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a great place to learn more and begin your adaptation planning efforts.
Comprehensive Planning
A number of local governments have found planning and assessing vulnerability across the broad range of government services as an effective approach to anticipate, plan for, and adapt.
Sector-Based Planning
A number of local governments have found focusing on a particular sector (e.g., Water Utility) as a practical way to make progress.
Adaptation Planning
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides useful adaptation planning strategies for communities. The site includes resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put their plans into action.
Adaptation Planning
A number of communities have found it advantageous to work collaboratively with neighboring communities to advance their adaptation planning goals.
Sector Based:
Adaptation Planning & Climate Adaptation
The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit provides a useful five-step process that outlines steps that communities can take to identify, assess, and confront their climate vulnerabilities. The site also provides resources (e.g., data, tools, case studies) from across the federal government to help communities put the process into action.
EPA Sector Based Tools:
 
region summary pdf contacts contacts2 factsheet
NE

The Northeast is projected to experience increased precipitation, more frequent and intense storms, and higher average temperatures. These projected changes pose challenges to communities as they protect water and waste infrastructure, maintain water quality, and protect air quality and public health. Many communities are building resilience to the risks they face under current climatic conditions.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Northeast Region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Northeast Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 1

(States served by EPA Region 1 - Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and 10 Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 2

(States served by EPA Region 2 - New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and eight Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 3

(States served by EPA Region 3 - Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and one Tribal Nation)
State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Connecticut State of Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection – Climate Adaptation Planning Exit Region 1
Delaware Delaware Division of Energy & Climate – The Delaware Climate Change Impact Assessment Exit Region 3
District of Columbia District of Columbia Department of Energy & Environment – Climate Adaptation and Preparedness Exit Region 3
Maine Maine Department of Environmental Protection – Adaptation Toolkit Exit Region 1
Maryland Climate Change Maryland – Adaptation Exit Region 3
Massachusetts Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs – Climate Change Exit Region 1
New Hampshire New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services – Adaptation Toolkit Exit Region 1
New Jersey State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection – Adapting to a Changing Climate Exit Region 2
New York Department of Environmental Conservation – Climate Change Adaptation Exit Region 2
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources – Climate Change Adaptation Exit Region 3
Rhode Island State of Rhode Island Division of Planning – RI Executive Climate Change Coordinating Council Exit Region 1
Vermont State of Vermont Agency of Natural Resources – Climate Change in Vermont Exit Region 1
West Virginia No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 3
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in the Northeast are Adapting

Cover page of Northeast fact sheet
NW

The Northwest is projected to experience changes in the timing of streamflow that will reduce water supplies for competing demands. Sea level rise, erosion, inundation, risks to infrastructure, and increasing ocean acidity pose major threats. Increasing wildfire, insect outbreaks, and tree diseases are causing widespread tree die-off.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Northwest Region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Northwest Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 10

(States served by EPA Region 10 - Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and 271 Tribal Nations)
State State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Idaho No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 10
Oregon Climate Change in Oregon Exit (including The Oregon Climate Change Adaptation Framework, 2010) Region 10
Washington Climate Change Adaptation Exit Region 10
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in the Northwest are Adapting

Cover of Northwest Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
SE

The southeast region is projected to experience higher average temperatures, increased precipitation, and more frequent and intense storms. These projected changes pose challenges to communities as they diversify water source, protect sensitive wetlands and protect people from heat waves. Climate impacts vary from a wet northern area to a dry southwest area.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Southeast Region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Southeast-Caribbean Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 2

(States served by EPA Region 2 - New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and eight Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 3

(States served by EPA Region 3 - Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and one Tribal Nation)

EPA Region 4

(States served by EPA Region 4 - Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and six Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 6

(States served by EPA Region 6 - Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and 66 Tribal Nations)
State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Alabama No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 4
Arkansas No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 6
Florida Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission – Adapting to Climate Change Exit

Florida Adaptation Planning Guidebook (2018)Exit (185 pp, 19 MB, About PDF)
Region 4
Georgia No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 4
Kentucky Action Plan to Respond to Climate Change in Kentucky: A Strategy of Resilience (2010)Exit (37 pp, 1.5 MB, About PDF) Region 4
Louisiana No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 6
Mississippi No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 4
North Carolina Climate Ready North Carolina: Building a Resilient Future Exit

Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE, 2016) NC Department of Health and Human ResourcesExit
Region 4
South Carolina No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified

Adapting to Shoreline Change: A Foundation for Improved Management & Planning in SC (2010)Exit (192 pp, 7 MB, About PDF)
Region 4
Tennessee No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 4
Virginia Virginia Coastal Zone Program – Climate Change Adaptation Efforts Exit Region 3
Territory Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico, Climate Change Council Exit Region 2
U.S. Virgin Islands Climate Change Exit Region 2
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in the Southeast are Adapting

Cover of Southeast Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
MW

The Midwest is projected to experience extreme heat, heavy downpours, and flooding that will affect infrastructure, health, agriculture, forestry, transportation, air and water quality, and more. Climate change will also exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Midwest Region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Midwest Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 5

(States served by EPA Region 5 - Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin and 35 Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 7

(States served by EPA Region 7 - Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and nine Tribal Nations)
State State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Illinois Illinois Climate Adaptation Toolkit Exit Region 5
Indiana Environmental Resilience Institute Toolkit Exit Region 5
Iowa Climate Change Exit Region 7
Michigan Michigan Department of Health & Human Services – Resilience Efforts at the National and Local Levels Exit Region 5
Minnesota Adapting to a Changing Climate Exit Region 5
Missouri No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 7
Ohio No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 5
Wisconsin What are Wisconsin's possible Adaptation Strategies? Exit Region 5
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in the Midwest are Adapting

Cover of Midwest Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
HPI

The Hawai'i and Pacific Islands are projected to experience warmer oceans leading to increased coral bleaching and disease outbreaks and changing distribution of tuna fisheries. Freshwater supplies will become more limited on many islands. Coastal flooding and erosion will increase. Mounting threats to food and water security, infrastructure, health, and safety are expected to lead to increasing human migration.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Hawai'i and Pacific Islands  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Hawai'i & Pacific Islands Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 9

(States served by EPA Region 9 - Arizona, California, Hawai'i, Nevada, Pacific Islands and 148 Tribal Nations)
State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Hawai'i Hawai'i Climate Adaptation Portal Exit Region 9
Territory Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
American Samoa Climate Change  Region 9
Guam Territory of Guam Exit Region 9
Northern Mariana Islands Northern Mariana Islands Exit Region 9
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in Hawai'i and Pacific Islands are Adapting

Cover of Hawai'i & Pacific Islands Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
AA

Alaska has warmed twice as fast as the rest of the nation, bringing widespread impacts. Sea ice is rapidly receding and glaciers are shrinking. Thawing permafrost is leading to more wildfire, and affecting infrastructure and wildlife habitat. Rising ocean temperatures and acidification will alter valuable marine fisheries.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Alaska  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Alaska Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 10

(States served by EPA Region 10 - Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and 271 Tribal Nations)
State State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Alaska Climate Change in Alaska Exit Region 10
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in Alaska are Adapting

Cover of Alaska Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
GP

The Great Plains is projected to experience rising temperatures leading to increased demand for water and energy. In parts of the region, this will constrain development, stress natural resources, and increase competition for water. New agricultural practices will be needed to cope with changing conditions.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Great Plains region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Great Plains Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 6

(States served by EPA Region 6 - Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and 66 Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 7

(States served by EPA Region 7 - Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and nine Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 8

(States served by EPA Region 8 - Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and 27 Tribal Nations)
State State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Kansas No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 7
Montana No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 8
Nebraska No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 7
North Dakota No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 8
Oklahoma No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 6
South Dakota No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 8
Texas No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 6
Wyoming No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 8
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation Climate Change Strategic PlanExit(83 pp, 5 MB, About PDF) Region 8
Fort Belknap Indian Community Fort Belknap Indian Community Climate Change Strategic Plan (Copy available from EPA Region 8) Region 8

How Communities in the Great Plains are Adapting

Cover of Great Plains Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
SW

The Southwest is projected to experience increased heat, drought, insect outbreaks, and wildfires. Declining water supplies, reduced agricultural yields, health impacts in cities due to heat, and flooding and erosion in coastal areas are additional concerns.

Use the links below for additional information about:
Southwest region  

You selected the National Climate Assessment's Southwest Region. Below you can find an EPA regional climate adaptation contact, EPA Regional Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan (2014), and state climate adaptation website corresponding to your location. States and territories covered by EPA regions are provided to help you identify localized information.

EPA Region 6

(States served by EPA Region 6 - Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and 66 Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 8

(States served by EPA Region 8 - Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and 27 Tribal Nations)

EPA Region 9

(States served by EPA Region 9 - Arizona, California, Hawai'i, Nevada, Pacific Islands and 148 Tribal Nations)
State State Climate Change Adaptation Website, if available EPA Region
Arizona No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 9
California California Climate Change Adaptation Exit
California Implementation Action Plans Exit
Region 9
Colorado Colorado Resiliency and Recovery Office Framework Exit Region 8
Nevada Nevada Climate Change Portal Exit Region 9
New Mexico No State Level Climate Adaptation Website Currently Identified Region 6
Utah Utah Climate Action NetworkExit Region 8
Tribal Nations Climate Change Adaptation Website EPA Region
  Tribal Nations Section – Climate Resilience Toolkit  

How Communities in the Southwest are Adapting

Cover of Southwest Region Factsheet: Adapting to Climate Change
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Air Quality A photograph of a city skyline. California Wildfires Green Infrastructure Wizard Logo
Water Utility Facility Operations Water Utility Blue Plains Wastewater FacilityView of Blue Plains Wastewater Facility along the Potomac River. CREAT Climate Scenarios Projection Map
Water Quality Preliminary Table of Assessed ThreatsPreliminary Table of Assessed Threats and Likelihood For Each Scenario and Time Period Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool Exercise with Southern Nevada Water Authority. Lake in the mountains with trees showing colored leaves of autumn.Allegheny National Forest Screenshot of SWMM 5 home page
Ecosystem Protection Estuary Southwest Florida Salt Marsh Link to Climate Ready Estuaries website.
Waste Management Emergency Response Waste water treatment plant near riverA range of major climate change stressors may affect landfills and contaminated sites. See adaptation strategies that target climate impacts. Image of Flooding at the American Cyanamid Superfund Site in 2011.Flooding at the American Cyanamid Superfund Site in 2011. Screenshot of Storm Surge Inundation Map
Public Health A man wiping sweat from his faceAs the world’s average temperature gets warmer, some areas are already experiencing an increase in the number of extremely hot days, and scientists expect severe heat waves to become more frequent and more intense in the future.  Massachusetts Public Health Survey Report CoverMassachusetts Public Health Survey Report Cover. Screenshot of Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool
Adaptation Planning Logo for the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit  Metropolitan Washington Image of 2016 Climate Assessment Report