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Septic Systems

Funding for Septic Systems


Federal Funding Sources

The CWSRF funds water quality protection projects for wastewater treatment, control of nonpoint sources of pollution, decentralized wastewater treatment, and watershed and estuary management through low interest loans to a variety of borrowers.

Under section 319 of the Clean Water Act, EPA provides grants to states to control nonpoint sources of pollution, such as agricultural runoff, mining activities, and malfunctioning onsite septic systems. Depending on the state's nonpoint source management program, grants may be used to construct, upgrade, or repair onsite systems. For more information, contact your state's nonpoint source coordinator.

EPA grant funding started 10 university-based environmental finance centers, the Environmental Finance Center Network, which work together with the public and private sectors to fund environmental programs.

Funding covers repair and maintenance of onsite systems.

HUD provides funds to states through community development block grants. The grants fund various projects, including rehabilitation of residential and nonresidential structures, construction of public facilities, and improvement of water and sewer facilities.

EDA administers various funding programs to promote collaborative regional innovation, public/private partnerships, national strategic priorities, global competitiveness, and environmentally sustainable development.

A searchable database of financial assistance sources (grants, loans, cost-sharing) available to fund a variety of watershed protection projects.

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State Funding Sources

Reimburses residents of the New York City Watershed in Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan, or Ulster Counties for eligible costs to repair or replace failed septic systems.

Provides support to low-income homeowners to replace straight pipes, outhouses, or failing septic systems with sanitary wastewater treatment systems.

Provides loans through the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust to homeowners to fix failing septic systems. Three programs assist on-site septic system owners with wastewater management problems: the Community Septic Management Program, the Homeowner Septic Loan Program, and a tax credit program.

PENNVEST, the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection offers low-interest loans to homeowners to repair or replace their individual on-lot sewage disposal system. 

Texas CEQ’s Nonpoint Source Program plans and implements activities that prevent or abate urban and other nonagricultural nonpoint source pollution in Texas waters.

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Funding Targeted for Tribal Communities

Provides funding for wastewater infrastructure to Indian tribes and Alaska Native Villages. EPA administers this program in cooperation with the Indian Health Service (HIS). Tribes must identify their wastewater needs to the IHS Sanitation Deficiency System to receive funding.

Provides information for tribes about EPA and other federal grant resources and regulations and policies for applying for assistance.

The Indian Housing Block Grant Program is a formula grant that funds various activities, include housing development, assistance to housing developed under the Indian Housing Program, housing services to eligible families and individuals, crime prevention and safety, and model approaches to solving affordable housing problems.

Provides financial assistance to tribes and Native American nonprofit organizations for projects that address environmental regulatory enhancement, including formulating ordinances, implementing laws, and training community members to manage natural resources.

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