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Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP)

SNAP Regulations

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program implements section 612 of the amended Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires EPA to evaluate substitutes for the ozone-depleting substances to reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. Through these evaluations, SNAP generates lists of acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for each of the major industrial use sectors. The intended effect of the SNAP program is to promote a smooth transition to safer alternatives.

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Rules

The following rules list substitutes that have been determined unacceptableHelpUnacceptableThis designation means that it is illegal to use a product as a substitute for an ODS in a specific end-use. For example, HCFC-141b is an unacceptable substitute for CFC-11 in building chillers. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. , acceptable to use conditionsHelpacceptable to use conditionsThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use., and acceptable subject to narrowed use limitsHelpacceptable subject to narrowed use limitsThis designation indicates means that a substitute would be unacceptable unless its use was restricted to specific applications within an end-use. This designation is generally used when the specific characteristics of different applications within an end-use result in differences in risk. Use of the substitute in the end-use is legal only in those applications included within the narrowed use limit. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use..

Substitutes that are acceptableHelpacceptableThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. without restriction are listed below in Notices of Acceptability

  • Rule 22- Revised use conditions for hydrocarbon refrigerants as substitutes for household refrigerators and freezers

    Final Rule

    This final action modifies the use conditions required for use of three flammable refrigerants—isobutane (R-600a), propane (R-290), and R-441A—in new household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The use conditions, which address safe use of flammable refrigerants, are being revised to reflect the updated UL Standard 60335-2-24 that is incorporated by reference. 

    To view the public docket, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2017-0472.

    Withdrawal of Direct Final Rule

    Direct Final Rule and Concurrent Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  • Rule 21- New listings of safer substitutes and prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP alternatives (December 1, 2016)

    EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program expands the list of acceptable substitutes; lists unacceptable substitutes; and changes the status of a number of substitutes that were previously listed as acceptable, based on information showing that other substitutes are available for the same uses that pose lower risk overall to human health and/or the environment. Specifically, this rule  lists as acceptable, subject to use conditions, a number of substances in the refrigeration and air conditioning, and fire suppression sectors; lists several substances as unacceptable in specific end-uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector; and changes the listing status for certain substances that were previously listed as acceptable in the refrigeration air conditioning and foam blowing sectors. EPA is also applying the existing listing decisions for foam blowing agents to closed cell foam products and products containing closed cell foam; and listing propane as acceptable, subject to use conditions, as a refrigerant in certain new equipment and exempting it in these end-uses from the venting prohibition under CAA section 608(c)(2). Finally, this rule clarifies the listing for Powdered Aerosol D, a fire suppression agent.

    To view the public docket, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2015-0663.

  • Rule 20- Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Under this final rule, various hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and HFC-containing blends that were previously listed as acceptable alternatives under the SNAP program are now listed as unacceptable for specific uses. This rule is part of the SNAP program’s continuous review of alternatives to find those that pose less overall risk to human health and the environment. Specifically, this action changes the listing status for certain HFCs in various end-uses in the aerosols, refrigeration and air conditioning, and foam blowing sectors. This action also changes the status from acceptable to unacceptable for certain hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) being phased out of production under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and section 605(a) of the Clean Air Act, where substitutes are available that pose overall lower risk to human health and/or the environment.

    To view the public docket, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2014-0198.

  • Rule 19- Refrigerant Alternatives

    Note: On August 8, 2018, EPA published a final rule to modify the use conditions required for use of the flammable refrigerant propane (R-290) in household refrigerators and freezers. See Rule 22 above.

    This final action lists additional refrigerant substitutes as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in new equipment in six end-uses. The updates to the listings are as follows:

    • Ethane in very low temperature refrigeration and in non-mechanical heat transfer
    • Isobutane in retail food refrigeration (stand-alone commercial refrigerators and freezers) and in vending machines
    • Propane in household refrigerators, freezers, or combination refrigerators and freezers, in vending machines, and in room air conditioning units
    • The hydrocarbon blend R-441A in retail food refrigeration (stand-alone commercial refrigerators and freezers), in vending machines, and in room air conditioning units
    • HFC-32 (difluoromethane) in room air conditioning units

    This final action exempts from the §608 venting prohibition these hydrocarbon refrigerants for the specific applications listed above.

  • Rule 18- Fire Suppression Alternatives

    Final Rule for Fire Suppression Alternative 
    Effective Date: May 29, 2013

    This rule lists C7 Fluoroketone as acceptable subject to narrowed use limits as a halon substitute for the streaming end-use. in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector.  PDF Version (7 pp, 308 KB) HTML Version (7 p,  48 KB)

    Withdrawal in Part of Direct Final Rule
    Effective Date: December 14, 2012

    This notice withdraws C7 Fluoroketone from the direct final rule issued September 19, 2012. The listing of two other substitutes, Powdered Aerosols F (KSA) and Powdered Aerosol G (Dry Sprinkler Powdered Aerosol (DSPA) Fixed Generators),  in that direct final rule remain in effect.  PDF Version (1 p, 197 KB) HTML Version (1 p, 5 KB)

    Direct Final Rule
    Effective Date: December 18, 2012 for Powdered Aerosols F and G

    This rule lists three halon substitutes in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector. Powdered Aerosol F and G are acceptable subject to use conditions in total flooding. C7 Fluoroketone is acceptable subject to narrowed use limits for the streaming end-use.

    Additional information: DSPA generators produce combustion byproducts (micron-sized dry particles and a gaseous mixture), that mix together into a uniform fire-extinguishing aerosol before being released into the protected area.  The propellant components of the system generates inert gases, which function to physically extinguish the fire by the combined effects of straining the burning flame front and reducing the heat of the combustion sources.  The small aerosol particles have a high surface area­to-volume ratio, which increases their ability to rapidly distribute throughout enclosed areas and to act as heat sinks. 

  • Rule 17- Listing of hydrocarbon refrigerants as substitutes for household refrigerators and freezers and retail food refrigeration

    Note: On August 8, 2018, EPA published a final rule to modify the use conditions required for use of the flammable refrigerants isobutane (R-600a) and R-441A in household refrigerators and freezers. See Rule 22 above.

    Effective Date: February 21, 2012

  • Rule 16- HFO-1234yf as a new substitute for motor vehicle air conditioning

    Effective Date: May 21, 2012

    Direct Final Amendment to Rule 16—Revised fitting for refrigerant containers of HFO-1234yf    Effective Date: May 21, 2012

    Effective Date:  May 31, 2011

  • Rule 15- Fire suppression and explosion protection listing under SNAP

    Effective Date: November 27, 2006

  • Rule 14- Alternatives for the motor vehicle air conditioning sector

    Effective Date: August 6, 2012

    This rule lists R-744 (CO2) as an acceptable alternative with use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

    This rule lists HFC-152a as an acceptable alternative with use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

    • Data Availability Notice (September 17, 2009; 74 FR 47774)
    • HTML Version and Print Version (2 pp, 48 KB)
    • This Data Availability Notice provides more information about, and seeks comment on, the short-term health effects of CO2 in confined spaces and potential use limitations as an automotive refrigerant.
  • Rule 13- The use of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b in foams / listing of ozone depleting substitutes in foam blowing

    Effective Date: May 29, 2007

  • Rule 12- n-propyl bromide(nPB) in solvents cleaning, aerosols, and adhesives as a substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b
    • Proposed Rule for Adhesives, Coatings, and Aerosols (May 30, 2007; 72 FR 30168)
    • Print Version (40 pp, 1.52 MB)
    • Final Rule for Solvent Cleaning (May 30, 2007; 72 FR 30142)
    • Print Version (27 pp, 451 kb)

    The May 2007 final rule for nPB in solvent cleaning finds nPB an acceptable substitute for ozone depleting substances in metals, electronics, and precision cleaning.

    The June 3, 2003 rule proposed to list n-propyl bromide (nPB) as an acceptable substitute for ozone depleting substances (ODSs), subject to use conditions, in the solvent cleaning sector as well as aerosol solvents and adhesive uses. EPA initially proposed that the use of nPB is acceptable subject to a use condition, limiting contaminants of nPB formulations from isopropyl bromide.

  • Rule 11- Fire suppression substitutes

    Effective Date: March 28, 2003

    EPA is issuing its decision on the acceptability of three halon substitutes in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector. HFC227BC found acceptable subject to use conditions in total flooding. C6-perfluoroketone and H Golden HFPEs found acceptable subject to narrowed use limits for the streaming end-use.

  • Rule 10- Acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in foams blowing

    Effective Date: September 30, 2004

    This action finds HCFC-141b unacceptable for use as a substitute for ODSs in all end uses in the foam blowing sector, except for specified exemptions, including use in space vehicles, nuclear energy, defense, and research and development for foreign customers.
    Effective Date: August 21, 2002

    This action lists acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the foam-blowing sector. The final rule withdraws the proposed decision to list HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for existing users; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in rigid polyurethane/ polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliance foam, and rigid polyurethane spray foam applications; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b, with narrowed use limits (users must ascertain and document that other acceptable alternatives are not technically feasible) in commercial refrigeration and sandwich panel applications and in the rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams end-use; and lists HCFC-124 as an unacceptable substitute in all foam end-uses. At this time, EPA is deferring final action on its proposed decision to list HCFC-141b as an unacceptable foam-blowing agent.

  • Rule 9- Removal of restrictions on certain fire suppression substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), and a list of substitutes

    Effective Date: April 1, 2002

    • Final Rule: Print Version (19 pp, 237 KB) (January 29, 2002; 67 FR 4185)
    • Concurrent Proposed Rule: Print Version (4 pp, 170 KB) (January 29, 2002; 67 FR 4222)

    EPA is rescinding use conditions that limit human exposure to halocarbon and inert gas agents used in the fire suppression and explosion protection industry. These use conditions are redundant with safety standards established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). In addition, EPA is taking direct final action to change the listing for HBFC-22B1 from acceptable subject to use conditions to unacceptable.

  • Rule 8- Prohibition for the use of refrigerant blends containing hexafluoropropylene

    Effective Date: January 26, 1999

    Hexafluoropropylene (HFP) and any blend containing HFP are listed as unacceptable for substitutes for CFC-12 and HCFC-22.

  • Rule 7- MT-31 as an unacceptable refrigerant under EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program

    Effective Date: January 26, 1999

    The refrigerant blend MT-31 is listed as unacceptable for all refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses.

  • Rule 6- Listing of two substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector

    Effective Date: May 26, 2000

    This action lists two substitutes for halon B1301 and halon 1211, IG-100,and HCFC Blend E in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector as acceptable, subject to use restrictions. Substitute IG-100 is for the end-use of total flooding systems and HCFC Blend E is for the end-use of streaming agents.

  • Rule 5- Two gases found unacceptable as substitutes for refrigerants in "self-chilling cans"

    Effective Date: April 2, 1999

    The action of this rule, lists unacceptable the use of HFC-134a and HFC-152a as refrigerants in "self-chilling cans."

  • Rule 4- Listing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems substitutes and a range of certain other substitutes

    Effective Date: May 28, 1999

    This action clarifies the criteria for unique fittings used in motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, and addresses the acceptability of HFC-4310mee and HCFC-225ca/cb. The end-uses for these substitutes are in metal cleaning and solvent in aerosols. C3F8, HFC-236fa, and C4F10 are found acceptable with use conditions for halon 1301 in-fire suppression and explosion prevention. The unacceptability of substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents, aerosols, fire suppression, and adhesives, coatings, & inks sectors are also listed.

  • Rule 3- Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector end-use

    Effective Date: November 15, 1996

    EPA issued its decisions on the acceptability HFC-4310mee, HCFC-141b, perfluoropolyethers, and perfluorocarbons. The end-uses of these substitutes are electronic and precision cleaning as well as aerosol solvents.

  • Rule 2- Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector

    Effective Date: June 21, 1996

    EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

  • Rule 1- Comment response document of public options concerning EPA rulemaking

    Effective Date: July 13, 1995

    EPA issued decisions on refrigerants and solvent cleaning sectors found acceptable subject to use conditions. The refrigeration sector deals with end-uses both retrofit and new equipment. HCFC Blend Beta was found as acceptable subject to use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning. Blend B was found acceptable subject to use conditions for; centrifugal chillers, chillers, industrial process refrigeration, skating rinks, storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, food refrigeration, ice machines, freezers, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners. HCFC-225 ca/cb is decided as a substitute for CFC-113 and MCF acceptable to use conditions in precision and metals cleaning. Various other substitutes were found unacceptable for refrigerants and air conditioning as well as in the solvents cleaning sector.

  • SNAP Final Rule - Process for administering the SNAP program and EPA's first acceptability lists

    Effective Date: April 18, 1994

    EPA published the SNAP Final Rule, which described the process for administering the SNAP program and issued EPA's first acceptability lists for substitutes in the major industrial use sectors. These sectors include:

    • Adhesives, Coatings, and Inks
    • Aerosols
    • Cleaning Solvents
    • Fire Suppression and Explosion Protection
    • Foam Blowing Agents
    • Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
    • Sterilants
    • Tobacco Expansion

    To assess the acceptability of a substitute, the Agency completes a screening analysis in which overall risks to human health and the environment in use-specific applications are examined. EPA continues to publish updates to the SNAP Final Rule in the form of a “Notice of Acceptability” or a “Rule.”

SNAP Notices of Acceptability

These notices expand the list of acceptableHelpacceptableThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. or pending substitutes for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The substitutes listed below are acceptable without restriction in the specific end-uses unless designated as pending. A pending substitute can be sold after the 90 day review period has expired, but its acceptability may be affected by a subsequent rulemaking. To see substitutes that are restricted or prohibited, see the list of rules above.

  • Notice 34

    Effective Date: October 4, 2018

    Acceptability Determination 34 (October 4, 2018; 83 FR 50026)

    This action presents EPA’s most recent decision to list as acceptable several substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, cleaning solvents, and aerosols sectors. New substitutes are:

    • R-448A, R-449A, and R-449B in ice skating rinks (retrofit equipment only);
    • R-450A and R-513A in ice skating rinks (new and retrofit equipment):
    • Acetone/isopentane blend in rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock;
    • Powdered Aerosol E in total flooding fire suppression (normally occupied areas); and
    • HFO-1336mzz(Z) in electronics cleaning, metals cleaning, and precision cleaning and aerosol solvents.

    To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.

  • Notice 33

    Effective Date: July 21, 2017

    Acceptability Determination 33 (July 21, 2017; 82 FR 33809)

    This action presents EPA’s most recent decision to list as acceptable several substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning and cleaning solvent sectors. New substitutes are:

    • HFC-134a in residential and light commercial air conditioning and heat pumps (retrofit equipment);
    • HFE-7300 in non-mechanical heat transfer systems (new and retrofit equipment), electronics cleaning, metals cleaning, and precision cleaning end-uses;
    • R-407H and R-442A in retail food refrigeration—remote condensing units (new and retrofit equipment);
    • R-448A, R-449A, R-449B, R-452A, R-452C, R-453A, and R-458A in multiple refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses (new and retrofit equipment); and
    • R-513A in residential dehumidifiers (new and retrofit equipment).

    To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.

  • Notice 32

    Effective Date: October 11, 2016

    Acceptability Determination 32 (October 11, 2016; 81 FR 70029)

    This action presents EPA's most recent decision to list as acceptable several substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning and fire suppression sectors. New substitutes are:

    • R-448A in retail food refrigeration—food processing and dispensing equipment;
    • R-449A in retail food refrigeration—food processing and dispensing equipment;
    • R-449B in several refrigeration end-uses; and
    • trans-1-chloro-3,3,3,-trifluoroprop-1-ene in total flooding fire suppression uses.

    To review publicly available docket materials electronically, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118. Supporting materials are also available in the Air and Radiation docket in hard copy.

  • Notice 31

    Effective Date: May 23, 2016

    Acceptability Determination 31 (May 23, 2016; 81 FR 32241)

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. New substitutes are:

    • CO2 in several refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses;
    • HFO-1336mzz(Z) in several refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses;
    • HFO-1336mzz(Z)/trans-1,2-dichloroethylene blend in centrifugal and positive-displacement chillers; and
    • R-513A in retail food refrigeration—food processing and dispensing equipment.

    To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.

  • Notice 30

    Effective Date: July 16, 2015

    Acceptability Determination 30 (July 16, 2015; 80 FR 42053)

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. New substitutes are:

    • R-450A in new vending machines;
    • R-448A, R-513A, and R-449A in several refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses;
    • Methoxytridecafluoroheptene isomers in non-mechanical heat transfer, three solvent cleaning end-uses, aerosol solvents; and adhesives and coatings; and
    • Hydrofluoroolefin (HFO)-1336mzz(Z) for high-pressure two-part spray foam.

    To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.

  • Notice 29

    Effective Date: October 21, 2014

    Acceptability Determination 29 (October 21, 2014; 79 FR 62863)

    EPA is increasing the options for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, and fire suppressants that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. On October 15, 2014, a Notice of Acceptability was signed expanding the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. This action also builds on the announcements made on September 16th concerning new private sector commitments to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).  

    The notice lists the following as acceptable:

    • trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoroprop-1-ene in non-mechanical heat transfer, and in flexible polyurethane foams
    • CO2 in refrigerated transport
    • R-450A in a variety of refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses
    • Methylal in a variety of foam blowing end-uses
    • Hydrofluoroolefin (HFO)-1336mzz(Z) in a variety of foam blowing end-uses
    • Powdered Aerosol D in the total flooding end-use

    To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.

  • Notice 28

    Effective Date: May 17, 2013

    Acceptability Determination 28 (May 17, 2013; 78 FR 29034)

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, solvent cleaning, aerosol and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes. 

    • Erratum: In section I.B.1, the text incorrectly identifies HFC-365mfc as 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane with Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CASRN) 138495-42-8. The correct name is 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane and the correct CASRN is 406-58-6.
    • Erratum: In section I.A.1, the text incorrectly indicates that R-442A contains 31.1 percent by weight HFC-32 and 31.1 percent by weight HFC-125. The correct amount for each constituent is 31.0 percent.
  • Notice 27

    Effective Date: August 10, 2012

    Acceptability Determination 27 (August 10, 2012; 77 FR 47768 )

    PDF (Adobe Acrobat) File (12 pp., 320 K)

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes. 

  • Notice 26

    Effective Date: October 4, 2011

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, solvent cleaning and fire suppression. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Acceptability Determination 26 (Oct. 4, 2011; 76 FR 61269)  

    • Erratum: In section B.1, the text incorrectly says that HCFC-225ca has a GWP of 1,220. This should instead read “122.”. Source: IPCC, 2007: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.)). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.
  • Notice 24

    Effective Date: September 30, 2009

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes. In addition, this document informs the public that the refrigerant blend previously found acceptable under the name KDD5 has received the ASHRAE designation R-438A and has the trade name ISCEON® MO99.

  • Notice 23

    Effective Date: January 2, 2009

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, fire suppression, and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes.

  • Notice 22

    Effective Date: October 4, 2007

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning. The determinations concern new substitutes.

  • Notice 21

    Effective Date: September 28, 2006

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

  • Notice 20

    Effective Date: March 29, 2006

    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and fire suppression and explosion protection. The determinations concern new substitutes.

  • Notice 19

    Effective Date: October 1, 2004

    EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

  • Notice 18

    Effective Date: August 21, 2003

    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    • Refrigeration and air-conditioning sector EPA has found acceptable RS-44 as a substitute for HCFC-22 and R-407C as a substitute for R-502 in the following end-uses (new and retro-fit); industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning, ice skating rinks, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, screw chillers, non-mechanical heat transfer systems, household and light commercial air conditioning, as well as residential dehumidifiers. Also, EPA decided ISCEON 89 as an acceptable substitute for R-13B1 in very low temperature refrigeration.
    • EPA has decided acceptable for the solvent cleaning sector HFE-7000 as a substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b in the end-uses of precision cleaning and electronics cleaning.
    • The foam blowing sector EPA decided acceptable Ecomate as a substitute for CFC and HCFCs, HCF-245fa as a substitute for HCFCs and blends of HFC-245fa and HCFC-22 as a substitute for blends of HCFC-141b and HCFC-22 in the following end-uses; rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliance foam, rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams, rigid polyurethane commercial refrigeration and sandwich panels, polyurethane integral skin foam, phenolic insulation board and bunstock, and polyolefin.
    • EPA has decided for the fire suppression and explosion protection sectors NAF S-125 as an acceptable substitute for halon 1301 in the end-use of total flooding.
    • In the aerosol sector, HFE-7000 is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, HCFC-141b in the end-use of aerosol solvents.
  • Notice 17

    Effective Date: December 20, 2002

    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    • EPA's decision for acceptable substitutes in refrigeration and air conditioning are RS-24 as a substitute for CFC-12, NU-22 as a substitute for R-502, and R-404A, R-507A, R-407C as substitutes for HCFC-22 and HCFC blends. The end-uses for these substitutes are; industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning (only new), ice skating rinks, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, reciprocating chillers, centrifugal chillers, screw chillers, very low temperature refrigeration, non-mechanical heat transfer systems, household and light commercial air conditioning, residential dehumidifiers.
    • EPA's decision for the solvent cleaning sector of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb as acceptable substitutes for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform for metal cleaning.
    • EPA's decision for the fire suppression and explosion protection sector of C6-perfluoroketone as an acceptable substitute for halon 1301.
    • EPA's decision for the aerosol sector of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb as acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in the end-use of aerosol solvents.
  • Notice 16

    Effective Date: March 22, 2002

    The ozone depleting substitutes are for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks. In addition, we are notifying the public of new information available on the toxicity of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb, acceptable substitutes used in solvents cleaning.

  • Notice 15

    Effective Date: May 23, 2001

    EPA's decision for acceptable substitute uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector.

    • HFC-134a/HBr (98/8) as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502, with the end uses of retail food refrigeration and cold storage warehouses for primary heat transfer fluid in new secondary-loop equipment for not-in-kind replacements of systems and the end-use of refrigerated transport.
    • HFC-134a/HBr (92/8) as an acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, CFC-115, and R-507 in the end-use of industrial process refrigeration.
    • PFC-330ST, PFC-550HC, PFC-660HC, PFC-1100HC, PFC-1100LT, PGC-100, PGC-150, PFC-331ST, PFC-551HC, PFC-661HC, PFC-1101HC, and PGC-151 as acceptable substitutes for CFC- 13, CFC-113, CFC-114, and blends thereof for the end-use of very low temperature refrigeration (new and retrofit).
  • Notice 14

    Effective Date: December 18, 2000

    This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

    • Hydrofluoroether 7100 and Hydrofluoroether 7200 for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, CFC-115, HCFC-22, R-502, R-503, and R-13B1 in the refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses of industrial process refrigeration, retail food refrigeration, and very low temperature refrigeration, as a secondary heat transfer fluid in new equipment for not-in-kind replacements of systems. Also, non-mechanical heat transfer for use in retrofit and new equipment.
    • FOR12A and FOR12B for an acceptable substitute of HCFC-22 and CFC-12, NU-22 for an acceptable substitute of HCFC-22, and SP34E for an acceptable substitute of CFC-12 for the refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses; industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, industrial process refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household refrigerators and freezers, residential air conditioning and heat pumps, residential dehumidifiers, motor vehicle air conditioning and buses only.
    • Methyl formate as an acceptable substitute for CFCs and HCFCs in the following foam sector end-uses; rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliances, rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams, rigid polyurethane commercial refrigeration and sandwich panels, and polyurethane integral skin foam.
    • Hydrofluoroether 7100 as an acceptable substitute for HCFC-141b and HCFC-22; Heptafluorocyclopentane as acceptable substitutes for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b; and HFC-365mfc as an acceptable substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b in the non-aerosol solvent cleaning end-uses of all metals cleaning, precision cleaning, and electronics cleaning applications.
  • Notice 13

    Effective Date: June 19, 2000

    There are listing of substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning as well as foam blowing.

    • The refrigeration and air conditioning acceptable substitutes are HFC-4310mee for CFCs and HCFCs, Ikon A and Ikon B for CFC-12, and HFC-245fa for CFC-11 (new only). These substitutes are for the following end uses: non-mechanical heat transfer, household refrigeration and freezers, commercial comfort air conditioning, cold storage warehouses, industrial process refrigerators and air conditioners, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, and small auxiliary power units.
    • Vacuum panels are acceptable as substitutes for HCFC blown rigid polyurethane appliance foam, and 2-chloropropane is acceptable for HCFCs in rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foam.
  • Notice 12

    Effective Date: April 11, 2000

    This notice deals with acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, and foam blowing. The end uses for refrigeration and air-conditioning are uranium isotope separation processing (retrofit), using furan as an acceptable substitute for CFC-114. All foam-blowing end uses are included, for saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6 for HCFC-141b, except HCFC-141b replacement in spray foam applications.

  • Notice 11

    Effective Date: December 6, 1999

    This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

    • HFC-245fa is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11 and HCFC-141b in all foam end-uses.
    • Exxsol Blowing Agents are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in all foam end-uses.
    • Hydrofluoroether (HFE-7200) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform (MCF) in all solvents cleaning end-uses and solvents in aerosol products.
    • THR-02 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household refrigerators and freezers.
    • THR-03 is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC- 22 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, ice skating rinks, household refrigerators and freezers, and residential window unit air-conditioning.
    • ISCEON 59 is acceptable as a substitute for R- 22 in the following end-uses: Household and light commercial air-conditioning, commercial comfort air-conditioning, industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household and other refrigerated appliances, ice skating rinks, and non-mechanical heat transfer.
    • HFC-152a is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, and residential dehumidifiers.
    • The cryo-mechanical cryogenic transport system that uses recaptured and recycled liquid carbon dioxide or liquid nitrogen is acceptable as a substitute for R-502 or CFC-12 in the transport refrigeration end-use.
    • Hydrofluroether (HFE-7200) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 in non-mechanical heat transfer.
  • Notice 10

    Effective Date: June 8, 1999

    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    • THR-04 is acceptable as a substitute for R-502 in all refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
    • HFC-236fa, when manufactured using any process that does not convert perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) directly to HFC-236fa in a single step, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-114 in non-mechanical heat transfer.
    • HFE-7100, Hydrofluoroether, is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 in non-mechanical heat transfer.
    • HFC-23 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in very low-temperature refrigeration.
    • HFC-134a and HFC-152a are acceptable substitutes for HCFCs in all foam blowing end-uses.
    • Carbon dioxide and water are acceptable substitute for HCFCs in all foam blowing end-uses.
    • HFC-4310mee is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC-141b in all solvents cleaning and aerosol solvent end-uses.
    • Benzotrifluoride is an acceptable substitute with an exposure limit (AEL) of 100 ppm for all solvent cleaning, aerosols solvents, adhesives, coatings, and inks end-uses.
  • Notice 9

    Effective Date: May 22, 1998

    This is a summary of acceptable decisions of substitutes for aerosol propellants. CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b are being replaced by HFC-227ea.

  • Notice 8

    .

    • Notice 8 (February 24, 1998; 63 FR 9151)

    This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

  • Notice 7

    Effective Date: June 3, 1997

    This notice lists GHG-X5, MT-31, HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and GHG-X5 as substitutes for foam blowing, refrigeration, and air conditioning. The foam blowing end uses are HCFCs, polyurethane integral skin with an acceptable substitute of sub-saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. CFC-12 centrifugal and reciprocating chillers, industrial process refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators, household freezers, and residential dehumidifiers (retrofitted and new). Also, CFC-12 motor vehicle air conditioning, automotive and non-automotive (retrofitted and new).

  • Notice 6

    Effective Date: March 10, 1997

    This notice contains substitutes for refrigeration and the foam sector. Substitutes include HFC-236fa and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. The refrigeration sector end-use is CFC-114 industrial process refrigeration, with an acceptable substitute of HFC-236fa. The foam sector acceptable decisions are for the end-uses of HCFCs rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, HCFCs rigid polyurethane appliance, and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. There are various acceptable substitutes for these end uses in the foam sector.

  • Notice 5

    Effective Date: September 5, 1996

    • Notice 5 (September 5, 1996; 61 FR 47012)

    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    • Hot Shot, GHG-X4, Freezone, Freeze 12, G2018C, NARM-502, and R-401C are acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
    • R-507, ammonia, evaporative and desiccant cooling, and water/lithium bromide are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22 in refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
    • Proprietary Blowing Agent 1 (PBA 1) is an acceptable substitute for CFCs in HCFCs for rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foam; rigid polyurethane appliance; rigid polyurethane slabstock and other; and rigid polyurethane spray and commercial refrigeration, and sandwich panels.
    • Foam A is acceptable as a Halon 1301 substitute for fire suppression and explosion protection.
    • Hydrofluoroether (HFE-7100) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform (MCF) in solvents cleaning, and aerosol solvents.
    • Trans-1, 2-dichloroethylene is acceptable as an alternative to MCF and CFC-113 in adhesives.
  • Notice 4

    Effective Date: February 8, 1996

    • Notice 4 (February 8, 1996; 61 FR 4736)

    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the end-uses of refrigerants, fire suppression and explosion protection, foam blowing, and solvent cleaning.

    • HCFC Blend Beta was listed as containing HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and isobutane. In fact, according to the submission on file with EPA, this blend contains butane. The determination that this blend is acceptable subject to certain use conditions applied to the actual blend, not to the incorrectly listed one.
    • R-508, which contains HFC-23 and R-116, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in retrofitted and new very low temperature refrigeration.
    • HCFC Blend Delta is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in retrofitted household refrigerators and freezers.
    • HCFC Blend Lambda is acceptable as a substitute for R-500 in retrofitted centrifugal chillers and as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following new and retrofitted end-uses.
    • R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22. The following are the new end-uses for the substitutes: centrifugal, reciprocating, and screw chillers, industrial process refrigeration systems, very-low-temperature industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning, ice skating rinks, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, residential dehumidifiers, household and light commercial air conditioning.
    • HFC-134a is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC-22 in new Household and Light Commercial Air Conditioning.
  • Notice 3

    Effective Date: July 28, 1995

    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as fire suppression and explosion protection sector.

    • Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxanes and decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector.
    • Water is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems.
    • Mineral oil is acceptable as a substitute for CFC- 11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems.
    • R-508, which contains HFC-23 and R-116, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in retrofitted and new industrial process refrigeration.
    • Ammonia absorption is acceptable as an alternative technology to household refrigerators and freezers using CFC-12 as a refrigerant.
    • Water Mist systems using potable water or natural seawater are acceptable as Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 substitutes.
  • Notice 2

    Effective Date: January 13, 1995

    • Notice 2 (January 13, 1995; 60 FR 3318)

    This notice states acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as the foam blowing sector.

    • R-401A and R-401B, which consist of HCFC-22, HFC-152a, and HCFC- 124, are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, R-500, and R-502 in various refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
    • CO2 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in various refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
    • HCFC-22 and HFC-134a are acceptable as substitutes for R-400 (60/40) and CFC-114 in New Industrial Process Air Conditioning.
    • R-401A and R-401B are acceptable as a substitutes for R-400(60/40) and CFC-114 in Retrofitted Industrial Process Air Conditioning.
    • R-404A, which consists of HFC-125, HFC-143a, and HFC-134a, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in new household refrigerators.
    • R-507, which consists of HFC-125 and HFC-143a, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in new household refrigerators.
    • Hydrocarbon Blend B is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new industrial process refrigeration systems.
  • Notice 1

    Effective Date: August 26, 1994

    • Notice 1 (August 26, 1994; 59 FR 44240)

    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

    • R-406A is acceptable as a substitute for R-500 in retrofitted centrifugal chillers.
    • HCFC-123, R-406, R-407A, R-407B, and HCFC Blend Epsilon are acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and R-502 for end-uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
    • HFC-23, R-403, and PFC Blend Alpha are acceptable substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
    • HCFC Blend Gamma is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502 in various end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning.
    • R-402A and R-402B are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and R-502 in retrofitted household freezers.
    • R-507 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502 in various end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning.
    • The Electroset Manufacturing Technology is an acceptable substitute for CFC-11 blown rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foams.
    • HFC-143a is acceptable as an alternative to CFC-12 in polystyrene boardstock and billet foams.
    • Saturated Light Hydrocarbons C3-C6 Saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6 (and blends thereof) are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11 and methyl chloroform in polyurethane flexible foam.
    • Methylene chloride is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
    • Polyolefin Chemical Blend A is an acceptable substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
    • HFC-152a/Saturated Light Hydrocarbons C3-C6 blends are acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
    • Trans-1, 2-dichloroethylene is acceptable as an alternative to MCF and CFC-113 in electronic, precision, and metals cleaning.
    • Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxanes and decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes are acceptable alternatives to MCF and CFC-113 in electronic, precision, and metals cleaning.
    • HCFC-123 is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and MCF in precision cleaning.
    • HCFC-124, HCFC Blend C, HCFC Blend D, and Gelled Halocarbon/Dry Chemical Suspension are acceptable as Halon 1211 substitutes.
    • HCFC Blend A is acceptable as a medical sterilant substitute for 12/88 CFC-12/EtO.

Other SNAP Federal Register Publications

  • Notification of Guidance and a Stakeholder Meeting Concerning the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program

    This document provides information related to EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program final rule issued on July 20, 2015, and the decision of the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in the case of Mexichem Fluor, Inc. v. EPA vacating the rule in part and remanding to the Agency. This document provides guidance on how EPA plans to implement the court’s partial vacatur in the near term, pending a rulemaking, and information on the Agency’s plan to address the remand of the 2015 Rule through rulemaking. The Agency is also providing notice of a stakeholder meeting in advance of that rulemaking to be held on May 4, 2018 at EPA HQ.

    EPA has not established a new docket for this document. Publicly available information on the related SNAP 2015 Rule can be found at www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2014-0198.

Rules

The following rules list substitutes that have been determined unacceptableHelpUnacceptableThis designation means that it is illegal to use a product as a substitute for an ODS in a specific end-use. For example, HCFC-141b is an unacceptable substitute for CFC-11 in building chillers. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. , acceptable to use conditions, and acceptable subject to narrowed use limits.

Substitutes that are acceptableHelpacceptableThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. without restriction are listed below in Notices of Acceptability

  • Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

    Rule 17 (27 pp, 298 KB) - Listing of hydrocarbon refrigerants as substitutes for household of refrigerators and freezers and retail food refrigeration

    Publication Date: December 20, 2011
    Effective Date: February 21, 2012
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 78832

    Rule 16 (8 pp, 261 KB) - HFO-1234yf as a new substitute for motor vehicle air conditioning

    Publication Date: March 26, 2012
    Effective Date: May 21, 2012
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 17344

    Rule 14 (16 pp, 345 KB) - Alternatives for the motor vehicle air conditioning sector

    Publication Date: June 6, 2012
    Effective Date: August 6, 2012
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 33315

    Description
    This rule lists HFC-152a as an acceptable alternative with use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

    Rule 3 (9 pp, 159 KB) - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector end-use

    Publication Date: October 16, 1996
    Effective Date: November 15, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 54029

    Description
    EPA issued its decisions on the acceptability HFC-4310mee, HCFC-141b, perfluoropolyethers, and perfluorocarbons. The end-uses of these substitutes are electronic and precision cleaning as well as aerosol solvents.

    Rule 2 - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector

    Publication Date: May 22, 1996
    Effective Date: June 21, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 25585

    Description
    EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

    Rule 1

    Publication Date: July 13, 1995
    Effective Date: July 13, 1995
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 31092

    Description
    EPA issued decisions on refrigerants and solvent cleaning sectors found acceptable subject to use conditions. The refrigeration sector deals with end-uses both retrofit and new equipment. HCFC Blend Beta was found as acceptable subject to use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning. Blend B was found acceptable subject to use conditions for; centrifugal chillers, chillers, industrial process refrigeration, skating rinks, storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, food refrigeration, ice machines, freezers, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners. HCFC-225 ca/cb is decided as a substitute for CFC-113 and MCF acceptable to use conditions in precision and metals cleaning. Various other substitutes were found unacceptable for refrigerants and air conditioning as well as in the solvents cleaning sector.

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Foam Blowing Agents

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

    Rule 10 (27 pp, 298 KB) - Acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in foams blowing

    Publication Date: September 30, 2004
    Effective Date: September 30, 2004
    Federal Register Citation: 69 FR 58269

    Description
    This action lists acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the foam-blowing sector. The final rule withdraws the proposed decision to list HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for existing users; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in rigid polyurethane/ polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliance foam, and rigid polyurethane spray foam applications; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b, with narrowed use limits (users must ascertain and document that other acceptable alternatives are not technically feasible) in commercial refrigeration and sandwich panel applications and in the rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams end-use; and lists HCFC-124 as an unacceptable substitute in all foam end-uses. At this time, EPA is deferring final action on its proposed decision to list HCFC-141b as an unacceptable foam-blowing agent.

  • Cleaning Solvents

    Rule 12 (40 pp, 1.52 MB) - n-propyl bromide(nPB) in solvents cleaning, aerosols, and adhesives as a substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b

    Publication Date: May 30, 2007
    Federal Register Citation: 72 FR 30142

    Rule 4 (6 pp, 264 KB) - Listing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems substitutes and a range of certain other substitutes

    Publication Date: April 28, 1999
    Effective Date: May 28, 1999
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 22981

    Description
    This action clarifies the criteria for unique fittings used in motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, and addresses the acceptability of HFC-4310mee and HCFC-225ca/cb. The end-uses for these substitutes are in metal cleaning and solvent in aerosols. C3F8, HFC-236fa, and C4F10 are found acceptable with use conditions for halon 1301 in-fire suppression and explosion prevention. The unacceptability of substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents, aerosols, fire suppression, and adhesives, coatings, & inks sectors are also listed.

    Rule 3 (9 pp, 159 KB) - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector end-use

    Publication Date: October 16, 1996
    Effective Date: November 15, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 54029

    Description
    EPA issued its decisions on the acceptability HFC-4310mee, HCFC-141b, perfluoropolyethers, and perfluorocarbons. The end-uses of these substitutes are electronic and precision cleaning as well as aerosol solvents.

    Rule 2 - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector

    Publication Date: May 22, 1996
    Effective Date: June 21, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 25585

    Description
    EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

    Rule 1

    Publication Date: July 13, 1995
    Effective Date: July 13, 1995
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 31092

    Description
    EPA issued decisions on refrigerants and solvent cleaning sectors found acceptable subject to use conditions. The refrigeration sector deals with end-uses both retrofit and new equipment. HCFC Blend Beta was found as acceptable subject to use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning. Blend B was found acceptable subject to use conditions for; centrifugal chillers, chillers, industrial process refrigeration, skating rinks, storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, food refrigeration, ice machines, freezers, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners. HCFC-225 ca/cb is decided as a substitute for CFC-113 and MCF acceptable to use conditions in precision and metals cleaning. Various other substitutes were found unacceptable for refrigerants and air conditioning as well as in the solvents cleaning sector.

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Aerosols

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

    Rule 4 (6 pp, 264 KB) - Listing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems substitutes and a range of certain other substitutes

    Publication Date: April 28, 1999
    Effective Date: May 28, 1999
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 22981

    Description
    This action clarifies the criteria for unique fittings used in motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, and addresses the acceptability of HFC-4310mee and HCFC-225ca/cb. The end-uses for these substitutes are in metal cleaning and solvent in aerosols. C3F8, HFC-236fa, and C4F10 are found acceptable with use conditions for halon 1301 in-fire suppression and explosion prevention. The unacceptability of substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents, aerosols, fire suppression, and adhesives, coatings, & inks sectors are also listed.

    Rule 3 (9 pp, 159 KB) - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector end-use

    Publication Date: October 16, 1996
    Effective Date: November 15, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 54029

    Description
    EPA issued its decisions on the acceptability HFC-4310mee, HCFC-141b, perfluoropolyethers, and perfluorocarbons. The end-uses of these substitutes are electronic and precision cleaning as well as aerosol solvents.

    Rule 2 - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector

    Publication Date: May 22, 1996
    Effective Date: June 21, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 25585

    Description
    EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Fire Suppression and Explosion Protection

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

    Rule 18 (7 pp, 308 KB) - Fire Suppression Alternatives

    Publication Date: April 29, 2013
    Effective Date: May 29, 2013

    Description
    This notice withdraws C7 Fluoroketone from the direct final rule issued September 19, 2012. The listing of two other substitutes, Powdered Aerosols F (KSA) and Powdered Aerosol G (Dry Sprinkler Powdered Aerosol (DSPA) Fixed Generators),  in that direct final rule remain in effect.

    Additional Information
    DSPA generators produce combustion byproducts (micron-sized dry particles and a gaseous mixture), that mix together into a uniform fire-extinguishing aerosol before being released into the protected area.  The propellant components of the system generates inert gases, which function to physically extinguish the fire by the combined effects of straining the burning flame front and reducing the heat of the combustion sources.  The small aerosol particles have a high surface area­to-volume ratio, which increases their ability to rapidly distribute throughout enclosed areas and to act as heat sinks. 

    Rule 15 (11 pp, 195 KB) - Fire suppression and explosion protection listing under SNAP

    Publication Date: September 21, 2006
    Effective Date: November 27, 2006
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56539 / 71 FR 56422

    Description
    This notice withdraws C7 Fluoroketone from the direct final rule issued September 19, 2012. The listing of two other substitutes, Powdered Aerosols F (KSA) and Powdered Aerosol G (Dry Sprinkler Powdered Aerosol (DSPA) Fixed Generators),  in that direct final rule remain in effect.

    Rule 11 (8 pp, 186 KB) - Fire suppression substitutes

    Publication Date: January 27, 2003
    Effective Date: March 28, 2003
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 4004

    Description
    EPA is issuing its decision on the acceptability of three halon substitutes in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector. HFC227BC found acceptable subject to use conditions in total flooding. C6-perfluoroketone and H Golden HFPEs found acceptable subject to narrowed use limits for the streaming end-use.

    Rule 9 (11 pp, 195 KB) - Removal of restrictions on certain fire suppression substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), and a list of substitutes

    Publication Date: January 29, 2002
    Effective Date: April 1, 2002
    Federal Register Citation: 67 FR 4185

    Description
    EPA is rescinding use conditions that limit human exposure to halocarbon and inert gas agents used in the fire suppression and explosion protection industry. These use conditions are redundant with safety standards established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). In addition, EPA is taking direct final action to change the listing for HBFC-22B1 from acceptable subject to use conditions to unacceptable.

    Rule 6 (6 pp, 264 KB) - Listing of two substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector

    Publication Date: April 26, 2000
    Effective Date: May 26, 2000
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 24387

    Description
    This action lists two substitutes for halon B1301 and halon 1211, IG-100,and HCFC Blend E in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector as acceptable, subject to use restrictions. Substitute IG-100 is for the end-use of total flooding systems and HCFC Blend E is for the end-use of streaming agents.

    Rule 4 (6 pp, 264 KB) - Listing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems substitutes and a range of certain other substitutes

    Publication Date: April 28, 1999
    Effective Date: May 28, 1999
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 22981

    Description
    This action clarifies the criteria for unique fittings used in motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, and addresses the acceptability of HFC-4310mee and HCFC-225ca/cb. The end-uses for these substitutes are in metal cleaning and solvent in aerosols. C3F8, HFC-236fa, and C4F10 are found acceptable with use conditions for halon 1301 in-fire suppression and explosion prevention. The unacceptability of substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents, aerosols, fire suppression, and adhesives, coatings, & inks sectors are also listed.

    Rule 2 - Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector

    Publication Date: May 22, 1996
    Effective Date: June 21, 1996
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 25585

    Description
    EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

    Rule 1

    Publication Date: July 13, 1995
    Effective Date: July 13, 1995
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 31092

    Description
    EPA issued decisions on refrigerants and solvent cleaning sectors found acceptable subject to use conditions. The refrigeration sector deals with end-uses both retrofit and new equipment. HCFC Blend Beta was found as acceptable subject to use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning. Blend B was found acceptable subject to use conditions for; centrifugal chillers, chillers, industrial process refrigeration, skating rinks, storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, food refrigeration, ice machines, freezers, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners. HCFC-225 ca/cb is decided as a substitute for CFC-113 and MCF acceptable to use conditions in precision and metals cleaning. Various other substitutes were found unacceptable for refrigerants and air conditioning as well as in the solvents cleaning sector.

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Sterilants

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Tobacco Expansion

    Original First Rule

    Publication Date: March 18, 1994
    Effective Date: April 18, 1994
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 13044

    Description
    This final rule promulgates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) program for evaluating and regulating substitutes for ozone-depleting chemicals being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). In section 612 of the CAA, the Agency is authorized to identify and restrict the use of substitutes for class I and II ozone-depleting substances where the Administrator has determined that other alternatives exist that reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. EPA is referring to the program that provides these determinations as the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The intended effect of this final rule is to expedite movement away fromozone-depleting compounds by identifying substitutes that offer lower overall risks to human health and the environment.

  • Adhesives, Coatings, & Inks

    Rule 20 (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB) - Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives

    Publication Date: July 20, 2015
    Effective Date: August 19, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42870

SNAP Notices of Acceptability

These notices expand the list of acceptableHelpacceptableThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. or pending substitutes for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The substitutes listed below are acceptable without restriction in the specific end-uses unless designated as pending. A pending substitute can be sold after the 90 day review period has expired, but its acceptability may be affected by a subsequent rulemaking. To see substitutes that are restricted or prohibited, see the list of rules above.

  • Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

    Notice 30 (PDF) (14 pp., 354 K)

    Publication Date: July 16, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42053

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses.

    Notice 29 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: October 21, 2014
    Effective Date: 41933
    Federal Register Citation: 79 FR 62863

    Description:
    EPA is increasing the options for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, and fire suppressants that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. On October 15, 2014, a Notice of Acceptability was signed expanding the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. This action also builds on the announcements made on September 16th concerning new private sector commitments to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).

    Notice 28 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: May 17, 2013
    Effective Date: 41411
    Federal Register Citation: 78 FR 29034

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, solvent cleaning, aerosol and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 26 (PDF) (11pp., 203 K)

    Publication Date: Oct. 4, 2011
    Effective Date: 40820
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 61269

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, solvent cleaning and fire suppression. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 25 (PDF) (24pp., 232 K)

    Publication Date: June 16, 2010
    Effective Date: 40345
    Federal Register Citation: 75 FR 34017

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and blends thereof for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations all include substitutes previously listed as substitutes for other ODS or as substitutes for HCFC-22 alone.

    Notice 24 (PDF) (9pp., 167 K)

    Publication Date: September 30, 2009
    Effective Date: 40086
    Federal Register Citation: 74 FR 50129

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes. In addition, this document informs the public that the refrigerant blend previously found acceptable under the name KDD5 has received the ASHRAE designation R-438A and has the trade name ISCEON® MO99.

    Notice 23 (PDF) (9pp., 215 K)

    Publication Date: January 2, 2009
    Effective Date: 39815
    Federal Register Citation: 74 FR 21

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, fire suppression, and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 22 (PDF) (5pp., 194 K)

    Publication Date: October 4, 2007
    Effective Date: 39359
    Federal Register Citation: 72 FR 56628

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 21 (PDF) (10pp., 214 K)

    Publication Date: September 28, 2006
    Effective Date: 38988
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56884

    Description:
    his notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 20 (PDF) (9pp., 219 K)

    Publication Date: March 29, 2006
    Effective Date: 38805
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 15589

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and fire suppression and explosion protection. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 19 (PDF) (8pp., 217 K)

    Publication Date: October 1, 2004
    Effective Date: 38261
    Federal Register Citation: 69 FR 58903

    Description:
    EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

    Notice 18 (PDF) (8pp., 192 K)

    Publication Date: August 21, 2003
    Effective Date: 37854
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 50533

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 17 (PDF) (10pp., 198 K)

    Publication Date: December 20, 2002
    Effective Date: 37610
    Federal Register Citation: 67 FR 77927

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 16 (PDF) (7pp., 187 K)

    Publication Date: March 22, 2002
    Effective Date: 37337
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 13272

    Description:
    The ozone depleting substitutes are for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks. In addition, we are notifying the public of new information available on the toxicity of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb, acceptable substitutes used in solvents cleaning.

    Notice 15 (PDF) (5pp., 176 K)

    Publication Date: May 23, 2001
    Effective Date: 37034
    Federal Register Citation: 66 FR 28179

    Description:
    EPA's decision for acceptable substitute uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector.

    Notice 14 (PDF) (13pp., 288 K)

    Publication Date: December 18, 2000
    Effective Date: 36878
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 78977

    Description:
    This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

    Notice 13 (PDF) (4pp., 254 K)

    Publication Date: June 19, 2000
    Effective Date: 36696
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 37900

    Description:
    There are listing of substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning as well as foam blowing.

    Notice 11 (PDF) (5pp., 131 K)

    Publication Date: December 6, 1999
    Effective Date: 36500
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 68039

    Description:
    This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

    Notice 10 (PDF) (6pp., 174 K)

    Publication Date: June 8, 1999
    Effective Date: 36319
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 30410

    Description:
    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    Notice 8 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: February 24, 1998
    Effective Date: 35850
    Federal Register Citation: 63 FR 9151

    Description:
    This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

    Notice 7 (PDF) (5pp., 128 K)

    Publication Date: June 3, 1997
    Effective Date: 35584
    Federal Register Citation: 62 FR 30275

    Description:
    This notice lists GHG-X5, MT-31, HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and GHG-X5 as substitutes for foam blowing, refrigeration, and air conditioning. The foam blowing end uses are HCFCs, polyurethane integral skin with an acceptable substitute of sub-saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. CFC-12 centrifugal and reciprocating chillers, industrial process refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators, household freezers, and residential dehumidifiers (retrofitted and new). Also, CFC-12 motor vehicle air conditioning, automotive and non-automotive (retrofitted and new).

    Notice 6 (PDF) (4pp., 122 K)

    Publication Date: March 10, 1997
    Effective Date: 35499
    Federal Register Citation: 62 FR 10700

    Description:
    This notice contains substitutes for refrigeration and the foam sector. Substitutes include HFC-236fa and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. The refrigeration sector end-use is CFC-114 industrial process refrigeration, with an acceptable substitute of HFC-236fa. The foam sector acceptable decisions are for the end-uses of HCFCs rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, HCFCs rigid polyurethane appliance, and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. There are various acceptable substitutes for these end uses in the foam sector.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 4 (PDF) (7pp., 146 K)

    Publication Date: February 8, 1996
    Effective Date: 35103
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 4736

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the end-uses of refrigerants, fire suppression and explosion protection, foam blowing, and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 3 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: July 28, 1995
    Effective Date: 34908
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 38729

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as fire suppression and explosion protection sector.

    Notice 2 (PDF) (5pp., 218 K)

    Publication Date: January 13, 1995
    Effective Date: 34712
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 3318

    Description:
    This notice states acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as the foam blowing sector.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Foam Blowing Agents

    Notice 30 (PDF) (14 pp., 354 K)

    Publication Date: July 16, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42053

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses.

    Notice 29 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: October 21, 2014
    Effective Date: 41933
    Federal Register Citation: 79 FR 62863

    Description:
    EPA is increasing the options for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, and fire suppressants that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. On October 15, 2014, a Notice of Acceptability was signed expanding the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. This action also builds on the announcements made on September 16th concerning new private sector commitments to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 25 (PDF) (24pp., 232 K)

    Publication Date: June 16, 2010
    Effective Date: 40345
    Federal Register Citation: 75 FR 34017

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and blends thereof for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations all include substitutes previously listed as substitutes for other ODS or as substitutes for HCFC-22 alone.

    Notice 24 (PDF) (9pp., 167 K)

    Publication Date: September 30, 2009
    Effective Date: 40086
    Federal Register Citation: 74 FR 50129

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes. In addition, this document informs the public that the refrigerant blend previously found acceptable under the name KDD5 has received the ASHRAE designation R-438A and has the trade name ISCEON® MO99.

    Notice 23 (PDF) (9pp., 215 K)

    Publication Date: January 2, 2009
    Effective Date: 39815
    Federal Register Citation: 74 FR 21

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, fire suppression, and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 21 (PDF) (10pp., 214 K)

    Publication Date: September 28, 2006
    Effective Date: 38988
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56884

    Description:
    his notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 20 (PDF) (9pp., 219 K)

    Publication Date: March 29, 2006
    Effective Date: 38805
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 15589

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and fire suppression and explosion protection. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 19 (PDF) (8pp., 217 K)

    Publication Date: October 1, 2004
    Effective Date: 38261
    Federal Register Citation: 69 FR 58903

    Description:
    EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

    Notice 18 (PDF) (8pp., 192 K)

    Publication Date: August 21, 2003
    Effective Date: 37854
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 50533

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 14 (PDF) (13pp., 288 K)

    Publication Date: December 18, 2000
    Effective Date: 36878
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 78977

    Description:
    This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

    Notice 13 (PDF) (4pp., 254 K)

    Publication Date: June 19, 2000
    Effective Date: 36696
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 37900

    Description:
    There are listing of substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning as well as foam blowing.

    Notice 12 (PDF) (3pp., 251 K)

    Publication Date: April 11, 2000
    Effective Date: 36627
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 19327

    Description:
    This notice deals with acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, and foam blowing. The end uses for refrigeration and air-conditioning are uranium isotope separation processing (retrofit), using furan as an acceptable substitute for CFC-114. All foam-blowing end uses are included, for saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6 for HCFC-141b, except HCFC-141b replacement in spray foam applications.

    Notice 11 (PDF) (5pp., 131 K)

    Publication Date: December 6, 1999
    Effective Date: 36500
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 68039

    Description:
    This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

    Notice 10 (PDF) (6pp., 174 K)

    Publication Date: June 8, 1999
    Effective Date: 36319
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 30410

    Description:
    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    Notice 8 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: February 24, 1998
    Effective Date: 35850
    Federal Register Citation: 63 FR 9151

    Description:
    This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 2 (PDF) (5pp., 218 K)

    Publication Date: January 13, 1995
    Effective Date: 34712
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 3318

    Description:
    This notice states acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as the foam blowing sector.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Cleaning Solvents

    Notice 30 (PDF) (14 pp., 354 K)

    Publication Date: July 16, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42053

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses.

    Notice 28 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: May 17, 2013
    Effective Date: 41411
    Federal Register Citation: 78 FR 29034

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, solvent cleaning, aerosol and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 26 (PDF) (11pp., 203 K)

    Publication Date: Oct. 4, 2011
    Effective Date: 40820
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 61269

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, solvent cleaning and fire suppression. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 21 (PDF) (10pp., 214 K)

    Publication Date: September 28, 2006
    Effective Date: 38988
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56884

    Description:
    his notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 18 (PDF) (8pp., 192 K)

    Publication Date: August 21, 2003
    Effective Date: 37854
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 50533

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 17 (PDF) (10pp., 198 K)

    Publication Date: December 20, 2002
    Effective Date: 37610
    Federal Register Citation: 67 FR 77927

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 14 (PDF) (13pp., 288 K)

    Publication Date: December 18, 2000
    Effective Date: 36878
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 78977

    Description:
    This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

    Notice 11 (PDF) (5pp., 131 K)

    Publication Date: December 6, 1999
    Effective Date: 36500
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 68039

    Description:
    This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

    Notice 10 (PDF) (6pp., 174 K)

    Publication Date: June 8, 1999
    Effective Date: 36319
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 30410

    Description:
    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    Notice 8 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: February 24, 1998
    Effective Date: 35850
    Federal Register Citation: 63 FR 9151

    Description:
    This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Aerosols

    Notice 30 (PDF) (14 pp., 354 K)

    Publication Date: July 16, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42053

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses.

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 25 (PDF) (24pp., 232 K)

    Publication Date: June 16, 2010
    Effective Date: 40345
    Federal Register Citation: 75 FR 34017

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and blends thereof for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations all include substitutes previously listed as substitutes for other ODS or as substitutes for HCFC-22 alone.

    Notice 21 (PDF) (10pp., 214 K)

    Publication Date: September 28, 2006
    Effective Date: 38988
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56884

    Description:
    his notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 18 (PDF) (8pp., 192 K)

    Publication Date: August 21, 2003
    Effective Date: 37854
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 50533

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 17 (PDF) (10pp., 198 K)

    Publication Date: December 20, 2002
    Effective Date: 37610
    Federal Register Citation: 67 FR 77927

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 16 (PDF) (7pp., 187 K)

    Publication Date: March 22, 2002
    Effective Date: 37337
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 13272

    Description:
    The ozone depleting substitutes are for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks. In addition, we are notifying the public of new information available on the toxicity of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb, acceptable substitutes used in solvents cleaning.

    Notice 14 (PDF) (13pp., 288 K)

    Publication Date: December 18, 2000
    Effective Date: 36878
    Federal Register Citation: 65 FR 78977

    Description:
    This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

    Notice 11 (PDF) (5pp., 131 K)

    Publication Date: December 6, 1999
    Effective Date: 36500
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 68039

    Description:
    This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

    Notice 10 (PDF) (6pp., 174 K)

    Publication Date: June 8, 1999
    Effective Date: 36319
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 30410

    Description:
    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    Notice 9 (PDF) (3pp., 155 K)

    Publication Date: May 22, 1998
    Effective Date: 35937
    Federal Register Citation: 63 FR 28251

    Description:
    This is a summary of acceptable decisions of substitutes for aerosol propellants. CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b are being replaced by HFC-227ea.

    Notice 8 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: February 24, 1998
    Effective Date: 35850
    Federal Register Citation: 63 FR 9151

    Description:
    This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Fire Suppression and Explosion Protection

    Notice 29 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: October 21, 2014
    Effective Date: 41933
    Federal Register Citation: 79 FR 62863

    Description:
    EPA is increasing the options for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, and fire suppressants that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. On October 15, 2014, a Notice of Acceptability was signed expanding the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. This action also builds on the announcements made on September 16th concerning new private sector commitments to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).

    Notice 28 (PDF) (8 pp., 283 K)

    Publication Date: May 17, 2013
    Effective Date: 41411
    Federal Register Citation: 78 FR 29034

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, solvent cleaning, aerosol and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 26 (PDF) (11pp., 203 K)

    Publication Date: Oct. 4, 2011
    Effective Date: 40820
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 61269

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, solvent cleaning and fire suppression. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 23 (PDF) (9pp., 215 K)

    Publication Date: January 2, 2009
    Effective Date: 39815
    Federal Register Citation: 74 FR 21

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, fire suppression, and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 20 (PDF) (9pp., 219 K)

    Publication Date: March 29, 2006
    Effective Date: 38805
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 15589

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and fire suppression and explosion protection. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 19 (PDF) (8pp., 217 K)

    Publication Date: October 1, 2004
    Effective Date: 38261
    Federal Register Citation: 69 FR 58903

    Description:
    EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

    Notice 18 (PDF) (8pp., 192 K)

    Publication Date: August 21, 2003
    Effective Date: 37854
    Federal Register Citation: 68 FR 50533

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 17 (PDF) (10pp., 198 K)

    Publication Date: December 20, 2002
    Effective Date: 37610
    Federal Register Citation: 67 FR 77927

    Description:
    The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 4 (PDF) (7pp., 146 K)

    Publication Date: February 8, 1996
    Effective Date: 35103
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 4736

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the end-uses of refrigerants, fire suppression and explosion protection, foam blowing, and solvent cleaning.

    Notice 3 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: July 28, 1995
    Effective Date: 34908
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 38729

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as fire suppression and explosion protection sector.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Sterliants

    Notice 25 (PDF) (24pp., 232 K)

    Publication Date: June 16, 2010
    Effective Date: 40345
    Federal Register Citation: 75 FR 34017

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and blends thereof for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations all include substitutes previously listed as substitutes for other ODS or as substitutes for HCFC-22 alone.

    Notice 21 (PDF) (10pp., 214 K)

    Publication Date: September 28, 2006
    Effective Date: 38988
    Federal Register Citation: 71 FR 56884

    Description:
    his notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 19 (PDF) (8pp., 217 K)

    Publication Date: October 1, 2004
    Effective Date: 38261
    Federal Register Citation: 69 FR 58903

    Description:
    EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

    Notice 3 (PDF) (6pp., 172 K)

    Publication Date: July 28, 1995
    Effective Date: 34908
    Federal Register Citation: 60 FR 38729

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as fire suppression and explosion protection sector.

    Notice 1

    Publication Date: August 26, 1994
    Effective Date: 34572
    Federal Register Citation: 59 FR 44240

    Description:
    This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • Adhesives, Coatings, & Inks

    Notice 30 (PDF) (14 pp., 354 K)

    Publication Date: July 16, 2015
    Federal Register Citation: 80 FR 42053

    EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses.

    Notice 27 (PDF) (12 pp., 320 K)

    Publication Date: August 10, 2012
    Effective Date: 41131
    Federal Register Citation: 77 FR 47768

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes.

    Notice 16 (PDF) (7pp., 187 K)

    Publication Date: March 22, 2002
    Effective Date: 37337
    Federal Register Citation: 76 FR 13272

    Description:
    The ozone depleting substitutes are for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks. In addition, we are notifying the public of new information available on the toxicity of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb, acceptable substitutes used in solvents cleaning.

    Notice 10 (PDF) (6pp., 174 K)

    Publication Date: June 8, 1999
    Effective Date: 36319
    Federal Register Citation: 64 FR 30410

    Description:
    This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

    Notice 5 (PDF) (8pp., 32 K)

    Publication Date: September 5, 1996
    Effective Date: 35313
    Federal Register Citation: 61 FR 47012

    Description:
    This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.