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Water Reuse Action Plan

Water Reuse

On February 27, 2019, EPA Assistant Administrator for Water, announced that the Agency will facilitate the development of a National Water Reuse Action Plan that will better integrate federal policy and leverage the expertise of both industry and government to ensure the effective use of the Nation's water resources. The National Water Reuse Action Plan will seek to foster water reuse as an important component of integrated water resources management.

The EPA's actions are part of a larger effort by the Administration to better coordinate and focus taxpayer resources on some of the Nation's most challenging water resource concerns, including ensuring water availability and mitigating the risks posed by droughts. This includes working closely with the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Energy, and other federal partners. For example, this work will directly complement the Department of Energy's leadership of the Water Security Grand Challenge announced on October 27, 2018.

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Development of the Draft National Water Reuse Action Plan

The EPA will facilitate discussions among federal, state, tribal, and water sector stakeholders and form new partnerships to develop and deploy the plan. A draft of the National Water Reuse Action Plan is scheduled for release and public review in September 2019 at the Annual WateReuse Symposium in San Diego.

The Discussion Framework for Development of a Water Reuse Action Plan is intended to frame the context for the National Water Reuse Action Plan and provide key background information regarding the business case for reuse, potential water reuse applications, potential scope for the draft National Water Reuse Action Plan, example collaborators and potential contributors, example forums for discussion, and published water reuse literature.

Providing Input for Development of the Draft National Water Reuse Action Plan

Development of the National Water Reuse Action Plan is expected to be informed using three main sources:

  • Input and public comment submitted through the online docket.
  • Identification of ideas and potential actions derived from the extensive published literature on water reuse.
  • Participation and discussion in various forums with our collaborators and partners.

Anyone may submit input to inform development of the draft National Water Reuse Action Plan. Ideas and input related to water reuse are welcome, including but not limited to:

  • Specific actions that can be taken now and in the future by federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, water utilities, industry, agriculture, and others with keen water interests;
  • Relevant sources of information, such as literature, about water reuse not already identified in the Discussion Framework;
  • Examples of water reuse, both past and future, which demonstrate opportunities and barriers;
  • Concepts for applying water reuse strategies within integrated water resources management planning; and,
  • Ways water reuse can improve water resiliency, security and sustainability through a more diverse water portfolio.

Comments and input received by July 1, 2019 will inform the draft National Water Reuse Action Plan. To access the public docket online, please use the link provided below:

About Water Reuse

Water reuse, sometimes also referred to as water recycling, may be viable for various applications, depending on site-specific conditions. Examples include agriculture and irrigation, potable water supplies, groundwater replenishment, industrial processes, and environmental restoration.

EPA supports water reuse as part of an integrated water resources management approach developed at the state, tribal, watershed, and local level to meet multiple needs. An integrated approach commonly involves a combination of water management strategies and engages multiple stakeholders and water needs.

EPA Resources about Water Reuse

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